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Salty Tongues Newsletter                                    September 2011                                                ...
Salty Tongues Newsletter                                  September 2011                                                  ...
Salty Tongues Newsletter                                September 2011                                                    ...
Salty Tongues Newsletter                                     September 2011                                               ...
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Salty Tongues September 2011 Newsletter

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Salty Tongues Toastmasters Club #5396 Newsletter for September 2011.

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Salty Tongues September 2011 Newsletter

  1. 1.     Presidentʼs Message Is Communication Important in Our Lives? Alejandro TornatoI  may  be  regarded  as  a  communication  or  speaking  freak.  I  say  this  because  I  am  constantly  reminding  people  of  the  importance  and  power  of  words  to  accomplish  good  in  this  world,  or  just  the  opposite,  to  accomplish  evil.  However,  since  one  of  my  pastimes  is  to  read,  I  recently  came  across  a  wonderful  quote  that  I  want  to  share  with  everyone,  “Communication  Skills  Are  the  Lifeblood  of  a  Successful  Life  .  .  .  If  You  Plan  On  Spending  Any  Time  There  .  .  .  ”  After  I  read  this  quote  for  the  very  first  time,  I  stopped  .  .  .  and  then  I  read  it  again  several  more  times.  Each  time  I  did  this  its  meaning  grew  more  and  more  inside  me  and  I  wanted  to  scream  to  the  top  of  my  voice,  “It  is  true!  It  is  absolutely  true!”  Did  you  ever  have  this  kind  of  powerful  experience?  It’s  really  fascinating,  and  now  let  us  go  back  to  the  main  subject  of  communication.      Let  me  ask  you  a  very  simple  question:  Is  communication  really  important  to  you?  Are  you  actively  engaged  in  developing  your  communication  skills?  If  you  are  honest  with  yourself,  would  you  say  that  you  are  a  better  communicator  today  than  you  were  one  year  ago?  How  about  five  years  ago?  Then,  if  you  are  not,  why  not?  Perhaps  it’s  because  the  art  of  communication  is  not  one  of  your  priorities,  and  again,  why  not?  Let  us  go  back  to  the  quote,  and,  as  we  do,  let  me  ask  you  if  you  are  living  a  successful  life  right  now,  or  if  you  would  like  to  begin  living  a  successful  life  from  now  on?  The  answer  to  this  question  is  crucial  because  from  the  quote  we  can  clearly  see  that  skills  in  communication  are  not  just  important,  but  are  the  “lifeblood”  of  a  successful  life.  Please,  pay  particular  attention  to  the  word  lifeblood,  which  is  an  indispensable  or  vital  element  essential  for  life  itself.  Therefore,  without  exaggerating,  achieving  mastery  in  your  communication  skills  will  determine  the  quality  of  life  you  will  enjoy.  I  don’t  know  about  you,  but  to  me  it  is  a  very  powerful  motivator  to  work  even  harder  to  become  a  more  effective  communicator.      My  fellow  club  members,  are  you  making  the  most  out  of  Toastmasters?  Do  you  remember  the  day  you  joined  the  organization  through  membership  in  a  local  club?  Were  you  happy,  excited,  and  ready  to  start  working  on  improving  your  inherent  abilities?  Are  you  still  as  happy  and  enthusiastic  to  be  a  club  member  today  as  you  were  then?  Well,  you  should  be  much  happier  now  because  my  hope  is  you  are  noticing  radical  changes  in  you  as  a  person.  What  changes  am  I  talking  about?  Most  likely  when  you  first  came  to  a  meeting,  you  preferred  to  be  hiding  in  a  corner  of  the  room,  out  of  sight.  Maybe  you  were  the  typical  introvert  kind  and  the  idea  of  
  2. 2. Salty Tongues Newsletter September 2011 2  standing  in  front  of  a  group  to  say  something  was  nothing  short  of  a  near-­‐death  experience.  However,  now  after  working  through  the  Toastmasters  educational  program,  you  feel  much  more  confident  in  yourself  and  your  abilities.  When  you  are  called  to  give  an  impromptu  speech,  you  walk  to  the  lectern  much  more  assertive  and  sure  of  yourself.  These  are  some  of  the  radical  changes  I  am  talking  about,  which  are  indeed  the  lifeblood  of  a  successful  life.      It  is  my  desire,  fellow  Toastmasters  and  members  of  Salty  Tongues,  that  all  of  us  as  a  group  will  recommit  ourselves  to  become  super-­‐energized  communicators,  making  this  club  the  very  best  that  District  15  has  ever  had.       Our New Club OfficersIn  June,  we  elected  our  new  club  officers  for  Salty  Tongues.  They  were  installed  in  a  special  ceremony  in  July  and  will  serve  our  club  until  June  30,  2012.      Who  are  these  dedicated  men  and  women?  What  roles  will  they  play  in  our  club  and  your  efforts  to  become  better  speakers  and  more  confident  leaders?  Read  on  and  you  will  find  out  who  our  new  officers  are  and  what  their  “official”  roles  are.  As  for  their  “true”  roles,  Alejandro  Tornato,  our  new  president,  said  in  a  recent  interview,  “Leadership  is  not  about  me,  it  is  the  joy  that  I  get  when  I  realize  that  my  actions  are  affecting  the  lives  of  others  in  a  positive  way.”      PresidentAlejandro Tornato, ACSOur  president  is  responsible  for  providing  the  supportive  club  environment  members  need  to  fulfill  their  self-­‐development  goals,  making  sure  that  members  benefit  from  the  Toastmasters  educational  program,  and  helping  the  club  recruit  new  members  and  retain  current  ones.      VP of EducationKim Cobler, CCOur  Vice  President  of  Education  is  responsible  for  providing  and  maintaining  the  positive  environment  and  programs  through  which  members  can  learn  and  grow.      VP MembershipJeri EvansOur  Vice  President  of  Membership  is  responsible  for  building  membership  and  ensuring  a  strong  membership  base  by  satisfying  the  needs  of  all  members.      VP Public RelationsDoug Woodall, ACBOur  Vice  President  of  Public  Relations  is  responsible  for  coordinating  an  active  public  relations  and  publicity  program.      
  3. 3. Salty Tongues Newsletter September 2011 3  SecretaryBruce Hager, ACG, CLOur  Secretary  is  responsible  for  keeping  clear  and  accurate  records  of  club  business  and  for  seeing  that  the  club  remains  financially  stable.      TreasurerKaren Kenner, ACS, ALBOur  Treasurer  is  responsible  for  keeping  clear  and  accurate  financial  records  of  club  business  and  for  seeing  that  the  club  remains  financially  stable.      Sergeant at ArmsRon WoodlandOur  Sergeant  at  Arms  is  responsible  for  maintaining  club  properties,  arranging  the  meeting  room,  and  welcoming  members  and  guests  at  each  meeting.      (For  more  information,  visit  http://bit.ly/nLBqjY.)       DCP Alejandro Tornato  If  you  have  been  a  member  of  Toastmasters  for  a  period  of  time,  I  am  sure  you  should  have  heard  the  term  “DCP.”  This  term  refers  to  the  Distinguished  Club  Program.  Now,  for  newer  club  members,  you  may  ask  the  valid  question:  What  is  this  program  all  about?  The  answer  is  quite  simple.  This  program  has  been  instituted  by  Toastmasters  International  in  order  to  measure  the  status  of  clubs,  its  activities  and  involvement,  and  how  engaged  clubs  are  to  the  Toastmasters  educational  program.  Let  me  explain  all  of  this  in  a  bit  more  detail  so  you  the  reader  get  a  clearer  picture.  DCP  consists  of  a  maximum  of  10  points  that  a  club  may  reach  throughout  the  Toastmaster  year,  which,  by  the  way,  runs  from  July  1  to  June  30  every  year.  I  want  to  make  an  important  notation  at  this  point,  and  it  is  the  fact  that  DCP  has  a  membership  requirement  element  attached  to  it.  The  club  must  have  at  least  20  active  members,  or  a  net  growth  of  at  least  5  members,  and  then  achieve  the  following  goals:   1. Two  CC  manuals   2. Two  more  CC  manuals   3. One  AC  Bronze,  Silver,  or  Gold   4. One  more  AC  Bronze,  Silver,  or  Gold   5. One  CL,  AL  Bronze,  AL  Silver,  or  DTM   6. One  more  CL,  AL  Bronze,  AL  Silver,  or  DTM   7. Four  new  members   8. Four  more  new  members   9. Minimum  of  four  club  officers  trained  during  each  of  two  training  periods   10. One  membership  renewal  report  and  one  club  officer  list  submitted  on  time    I  would  like  to  clarify  some  terms  especially  for  newer  club  members.  CC  is  the  
  4. 4. Salty Tongues Newsletter September 2011 4  Competent  Communicator  Manual,  which  is  the  first  manual  new  members  receive  upon  joining  a  Toastmaster  Club.  The  term  AC  refers  to  an  Advanced  Communicator  Manual,  of  which  there  are  several  to  choose  from  depending  on  the  kind  of  projects  a  member  wants  to  do.  Another  term  is  CL,  which  is  the  Competent  Leadership  Manual.  The  last,  but  certainly  not  the  least,  is  the  DTM  or  Distinguished  Toastmaster  Award.  This  is  the  highest  designation  achievable  in  the  Toastmaster  organization.      Now,  having  defined  the  terms,  and  coming  back  to  the  DCP,  if  a  club  achieves  5  of  the  10  possible  goals,  it  becomes  a  Distinguished  Club.  If  it  achieves  7  goals,  it  becomes  a  Select  Distinguished  Club.  If  it  achieves  9  goals,  it  becomes  a  President’s  Distinguished  Club.    In  conclusion,  the  DCP  is  a  program  that  measures  the  strength  and  quality  of  any  club  within  the  Toastmasters  organization  worldwide,  and  every  club  is  measured  under  exactly  the  same  standards.  Clubs  that  have  consistently  achieved  the  highest  designation,  have  proved  that  the  whole  membership  is  working  hard  on  its  personal  development  and  educational  goals,  and  it  is  a  club  highly  engaged  and  focused  on  continual  improvement.      Let  us  strive  at  the  Salty  Tongues  Club  to  continue  setting  higher  standards  of  excellence.         Balance Your Speeches Doug Woodall  At  times  I’m  a  very  slow  learner.  One  of  the  lessons  I  should  have  learned  quicker  than  I  did  had  to  do  with  balancing  my  speeches.  What  am  I  talking  about?  I’m  talking  about  putting  the  correct  weight  on  the  introduction,  body,  and  conclusion  of  my  speeches.  I  think  it  took  me  about  five  years  to  learn  this  lesson.      Let’s  start  this  way:  Think  of  dumbbells  that  are  5,  10,  20,  and  30  pounds  each.  Now  let’s  say  the  introduction  and  conclusion  of  a  good  speech  should  be  about  five  pounds  each.  In  the  old  days,  I  believe  I  put  the  proper  weight  on  my  conclusions,  but  most  of  my  introductions  were  10  to  20  pounds.  They  were  too  long.  What  was  the  consequence?  My  audience  couldn’t  always  decipher  where  I  wanted  to  take  them.      Introductions  should  be  like  sales  pitches—clear,  concise,  and  memorable.  In  the  humorous  speech  I  gave  at  our  club  and  at  the  area  contest  last  weekend,  all  I  said  was,       When  we  have  children,  we  worry  that  we  will  harm  them,  make   wrong  decisions  for  them,  and  they  will  blame  us  for  all  their   problems.  Let’s  face  the  facts.  No  matter  what  we  do  we  will  harm  our  
  5. 5. Salty Tongues Newsletter September 2011 5   children,  make  wrong  decisions  for  them,  and  they  will  blame  us  for   all  their  problems.  We  can  worry.  We  can  fret.  We  can  lose  sleep,  or   we  can  accept  our  true  role  in  their  lives  and  embrace  it.  My  message   to  you  is  embrace  it.      For  most  speeches  at  Toastmasters,  this  is  the  right  length  for  your  introductions.      My  speech  is  based  on  one  I  gave  several  years  ago  in  our  club.  I  still  remember  what  my  evaluator  said  about  the  body  of  my  speech.  In  a  nutshell,  he  said  I  didn’t  balance  it  properly.  (This  didn’t  surprise  you,  right?)  In  my  first  speech,  I  told  several  stories  about  each  of  my  children.  However,  I  told  more  stories  about  Max  than  I  did  about  my  daughters.  If  you  think  of  dumbbells  again,  I  put  45  pounds  on  Max  and  20  pounds  each  on  Megan  and  Mindy.  In  my  revamped  speech,  I  tell  one  story  about  each  child.  Because  the  stories  are  about  the  same  length,  the  weight  is  about  equal.  I’d  say  about  30  pounds  per  kid.      Not  all  speeches  will  be  like  my  humorous  speech.  That  is  to  say,  not  all  topics  will  be  weighed  the  same.  You  might  cover  three  topics  in  a  speech,  and  one  topic  needs  20  pounds,  the  next  30,  and  the  last  40.  This  will  probably  work.  If,  on  the  other  hand,  you  find  the  first  topic  is  5  pounds,  the  second  70,  and  the  third  15,  you  probably  don’t  have  the  right  balance.  One  solution  is  to  cut  out  the  first  and  third  topics.  A  story  is  a  perfect  example  of  a  speech  that  is  90  to  100  pounds.  Another  is  to  increase  the  weight  on  the  first  and  third  topics  and  split  the  second  into  smaller  weights.      When  it  comes  to  conclusions,  I  like  it  when  speakers  refer  back  to  something  they  said  in  the  introduction.  This  is  my  favorite  method.  However,  it  doesn’t  work  in  all  speeches.  Another  method  is  to  recap  the  main  points  you  made  in  your  speech.  One  more  is  to  show  how  you  proved  a  point.  Still  another  is  to  inspire  your  audience  with  an  new  idea,  ask  them  to  change  something  in  their  lives,  or  spur  them  into  action.      You  should  try  to  give  your  conclusions  the  same  weight  as  your  introductions;  however,  this  is  not  a  fast-­‐set  rule.  Sometimes  you  can  be  more  effective  by  giving  it  the  lightest  weight—maybe  as  light  as  two  pounds.  The  conclusion  of  my  humorous  speech  is  about  three  sentences  long.      Of  all  the  things  we  are  told  to  do  to  be  better  speakers,  I  cannot  think  of  one  that  is  easier  to  do  than  this  one:  Balance  Your  Speeches.  If  you  put  the  correct  weights  on  your  introduction,  body,  and  conclusion,  your  audience  will  understand  you  better  and  enjoy  your  speech  more.  They  will  go  away  thinking  you  are  a  great  speaker  and  they  heard  something  interesting,  inspiring,  or  profound.      

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