Designing for
Meaningful Experiences
IxDA November 17, 2010
David Kozatch
DIG
• Since 1998
• Combining marketing
research & user
experience research
• Focus on development
of new services and
technolo...
Technological
Innovation
Technological
Innovation
Meaning
“Combining and
integrating the power
of invention, design,
and marketing to
create meaningful
experiences for
customers pr...
Frog ‘Design Mind’ Blog :
Wanted: Chief Meaning
Officer By Tim Leberecht
“Trust and reputation
are no longer enablers
for ...
How do we define “meaning?”
“Interactions that go beyond their basic functionality to
provide a more complex emotional exp...
MEANING “Being green”
… it’s connecting with your users in a way that
recognizes their own experience
The Pizza Box
Paradigm
“Conventional Authoritative Voice”
3 most powerful words?
“You get me”
How does this
translate to online
experience?
A brief history
lesson
• One way communication from
“conventional authoritative voice”
• No real “listening” to user
• Objective: design a “clear...
•Multiple levels of cross-communication
•Greater collaboration and sharing
•More dynamic experience
•About communities
Web...
The semantic web:
Web 3.0
About the
individual and
context
So, what effect does this have on
users?
In this new open-
sourced world,
consumers are
increasingly taking
ownership.
We better be prepared …
What effect does this have on how we
design for and measure
user experience?
Nielsen’s usability heuristics …
Peter Morville’s “honey comb” …
The Pyramid
The Pyramid
Based on model by Stephen P. Anderson:
http://www.slideshare.net/stephenpa/
the-conversation-gets-interesting-...
The Meaning/Technology Dynamic: Online
So, how do you
design an interface
for a meaningful
experience?
3 possible ways …
1. Emotion (or “building a bridge”)
2. Polite interfaces
3. Adaptive interfaces
1. Emotion
2. Polite interfaces
3. Adaptive interfaces
Bridge
offline
and
online
world …
•User reviews
•Crowdsourcing
•Folksonomies/
User tags
•Games/quizzes
•Rewards (points,
levels, “random acts of
kindness,” ...
A mental model is an explanation of someone's thought process
about how something works in the real world. It is a
represe...
1. Emotion (or “building a bridge”)
2. Polite interfaces
3. Adaptive interfaces
•Forgiving:
•Helpful:
•Offers multiple ways of nav
/non-intrusive
•Interested:
•Simple and clear:
•Recalls last choices ma...
•Helpful/non-intrusive
•Interested
•Simple and clear
•Respectful
•Forgiving
SHOWYOURSELF TO ME!
Anticipate
user
intention
Make suggestions basedon my
needs
3. Adaptive
Content1. Emotion (or “building a bridge”)
2. Polite interfaces
3. Adaptive interfaces
An
adaptive
interface …
•Improves with user
interaction
•Develops a model of the user's
behavior
•Is constantly being refi...
Recommendation engines …
Oops– I already
ownthese!
Missing:
•Real transparency
•Deeper level of
participation
Adjust interface based on …
• User style
• Demographics
• MAC/IP address info
An
outdated
construct?
OnlineBillPay
promo???
Now you get me.
What we learned
The experience bar has been raised …
Users will expect and DEMAND …
… greater personalization/engagement
… greater transparency
… greater cross platform integration
… but your users
will ultimately decide
what is meaningful
Meaningcan be
communicated in
many ways …
What should you do?
Be a facilitator of interactions – not the
“conventional authoritative voice”
SHOW, DON’T TELL
Make it more of a conversation …
Encourage user participation …
But be careful how you do it!
Engage people early …
Try to match users’ Mental Model
Artist: Ian Webster
Build meaning into design personas:
Kenneth Parcel, age 29
Native of Stone Mountain, GA.
Typical Day: 20 hours of paging
a...
Test and listen for emotional language …
The Pyramid
• Was the (interface) helpful?
• Define value of the (interface) in terms of how it made
you feel
• Did you get a sense th...
… after satisfying
“core” requirements
of UI/UX
Look for ideas outside of your own GUI
Share ideas between departments/disciplines
Appoint a
“meaning
representative”
on the design team
LET’S GET
MEANINGFUL!
Contact Information
David Kozatch, Principal
Ph 212.727.7966
david@digsmarter.com
Susanna Kirk, Senior
Analyst
Ph 617.475....
Designing for meaningful_experiences_i_xda slideshare
Designing for meaningful_experiences_i_xda slideshare
Designing for meaningful_experiences_i_xda slideshare
Designing for meaningful_experiences_i_xda slideshare
Designing for meaningful_experiences_i_xda slideshare
Designing for meaningful_experiences_i_xda slideshare
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Designers and usability practitioners take various approaches to understanding the user experience, including following established heuristics (Jakob Nielsen), looking at UX as being made up of various elements of equal importance (Peter Morville’s “User Experience Honeycomb”), or via a hierarchical or pyramid approach in which more subjective, “higher level” goals of the user take precedence over simple objective measures of “usability” or basic functional aspects. We argue for the latter approach which recognizes that significant changes in online technology require the need to recognize a more complex understanding of how to effectively deliver on the user experience. The goal of this presentation is to provide practitioners with a framework for understanding the elements for creating meaningful experiences and provide specific examples for creating meaning in everyday interfaces.

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  • How do we approach user experience now? All elements take on equal value.Although we like Morville’s 7 elements of Usability, we feel that there is a hierarchy that needs to be considered (some elements are more equal than others)Morville: pioneer in IA field – model from IA perspective
  • Or give me a visual representation of a bunch of stuff.
  • Adjust interface based on user style: e.g., if user misses important action buttons, the interface automatically enlarges them; enlarge entry fields if user types long text itemsDemographics: Any site that collects birth date can automatically change font size and layouts for greater accessibility/readabilityFeed promotional and other messages not only based on my profile but on my user behavior?For more ideas: See Stephen P. Anderson’s excellent presentation … http://www.slideshare.net/stephenpa/the-conversation-gets-interesting-creating-the-adaptive-interface
  • Designing for meaningful_experiences_i_xda slideshare

    1. 1. Designing for Meaningful Experiences IxDA November 17, 2010 David Kozatch DIG
    2. 2. • Since 1998 • Combining marketing research & user experience research • Focus on development of new services and technologies • Web, mobile and beyond
    3. 3. Technological Innovation
    4. 4. Technological Innovation
    5. 5. Meaning
    6. 6. “Combining and integrating the power of invention, design, and marketing to create meaningful experiences for customers provides a blueprint to achieving sustained, stable growth.”
    7. 7. Frog ‘Design Mind’ Blog : Wanted: Chief Meaning Officer By Tim Leberecht “Trust and reputation are no longer enablers for the exchange of goods, services, and information, they are replacements for them. Values are the new value… Meaning is succeeding customer satisfaction.”
    8. 8. How do we define “meaning?” “Interactions that go beyond their basic functionality to provide a more complex emotional experience.”
    9. 9. MEANING “Being green” … it’s connecting with your users in a way that recognizes their own experience
    10. 10. The Pizza Box Paradigm
    11. 11. “Conventional Authoritative Voice”
    12. 12. 3 most powerful words?
    13. 13. “You get me”
    14. 14. How does this translate to online experience?
    15. 15. A brief history lesson
    16. 16. • One way communication from “conventional authoritative voice” • No real “listening” to user • Objective: design a “clear channel” -- no speed bumps or obstacles • About companies Web 1.0 Company Website Users
    17. 17. •Multiple levels of cross-communication •Greater collaboration and sharing •More dynamic experience •About communities Web 2.0
    18. 18. The semantic web: Web 3.0 About the individual and context
    19. 19. So, what effect does this have on users?
    20. 20. In this new open- sourced world, consumers are increasingly taking ownership.
    21. 21. We better be prepared …
    22. 22. What effect does this have on how we design for and measure user experience?
    23. 23. Nielsen’s usability heuristics …
    24. 24. Peter Morville’s “honey comb” …
    25. 25. The Pyramid
    26. 26. The Pyramid Based on model by Stephen P. Anderson: http://www.slideshare.net/stephenpa/ the-conversation-gets-interesting-creating- the-adaptive-interface
    27. 27. The Meaning/Technology Dynamic: Online
    28. 28. So, how do you design an interface for a meaningful experience?
    29. 29. 3 possible ways … 1. Emotion (or “building a bridge”) 2. Polite interfaces 3. Adaptive interfaces
    30. 30. 1. Emotion 2. Polite interfaces 3. Adaptive interfaces
    31. 31. Bridge offline and online world …
    32. 32. •User reviews •Crowdsourcing •Folksonomies/ User tags •Games/quizzes •Rewards (points, levels, “random acts of kindness,” etc.) Participation …
    33. 33. A mental model is an explanation of someone's thought process about how something works in the real world. It is a representation of the surrounding world, the relationships between its various parts and a person's intuitive perception about their own acts and their consequences. Our mental models help shape our behavior and define our approach to solving problems and carrying out tasks.
    34. 34. 1. Emotion (or “building a bridge”) 2. Polite interfaces 3. Adaptive interfaces
    35. 35. •Forgiving: •Helpful: •Offers multiple ways of nav /non-intrusive •Interested: •Simple and clear: •Recalls last choices made by user, sets up defaults •Minimal use of text •Respectful: •Doesn’t hold back info, declares itself •Can “undo” a mistake, provides user confidence Adapted from: http://susanavilaca.wordpress.com/2008/12/03/polite-computing-and-adaptive-interfaces/)
    36. 36. •Helpful/non-intrusive •Interested •Simple and clear •Respectful •Forgiving
    37. 37. SHOWYOURSELF TO ME!
    38. 38. Anticipate user intention
    39. 39. Make suggestions basedon my needs
    40. 40. 3. Adaptive Content1. Emotion (or “building a bridge”) 2. Polite interfaces 3. Adaptive interfaces
    41. 41. An adaptive interface … •Improves with user interaction •Develops a model of the user's behavior •Is constantly being refined •Responds with an interaction that fits the behavior
    42. 42. Recommendation engines …
    43. 43. Oops– I already ownthese!
    44. 44. Missing: •Real transparency •Deeper level of participation
    45. 45. Adjust interface based on … • User style • Demographics • MAC/IP address info
    46. 46. An outdated construct?
    47. 47. OnlineBillPay promo???
    48. 48. Now you get me.
    49. 49. What we learned
    50. 50. The experience bar has been raised …
    51. 51. Users will expect and DEMAND …
    52. 52. … greater personalization/engagement
    53. 53. … greater transparency
    54. 54. … greater cross platform integration
    55. 55. … but your users will ultimately decide what is meaningful Meaningcan be communicated in many ways …
    56. 56. What should you do?
    57. 57. Be a facilitator of interactions – not the “conventional authoritative voice”
    58. 58. SHOW, DON’T TELL
    59. 59. Make it more of a conversation …
    60. 60. Encourage user participation …
    61. 61. But be careful how you do it!
    62. 62. Engage people early …
    63. 63. Try to match users’ Mental Model Artist: Ian Webster
    64. 64. Build meaning into design personas: Kenneth Parcel, age 29 Native of Stone Mountain, GA. Typical Day: 20 hours of paging at the Top of the Rock, saving co- workers from certain angst and humiliation. Motivators: Getting online tasks done quickly so can get back to cheering everyone up. Values/Meaningful experiences most likely to respond to: Harmony, Duty, Truth “Being Nice can get you EVERYWHERE!”
    65. 65. Test and listen for emotional language …
    66. 66. The Pyramid
    67. 67. • Was the (interface) helpful? • Define value of the (interface) in terms of how it made you feel • Did you get a sense that the (interface) was listening/responding to your needs as you completed each task? • How does this (application) fit with how you perform related activities in your life? Q:
    68. 68. … after satisfying “core” requirements of UI/UX
    69. 69. Look for ideas outside of your own GUI
    70. 70. Share ideas between departments/disciplines
    71. 71. Appoint a “meaning representative” on the design team LET’S GET MEANINGFUL!
    72. 72. Contact Information David Kozatch, Principal Ph 212.727.7966 david@digsmarter.com Susanna Kirk, Senior Analyst Ph 617.475.5105 susanna@digsmarter.com Web: www.digsmarter.com Blog: blog.digsmarter.com

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