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Welcome to the year 1500
Welcome to the year 1500
Welcome to the year 1500
Welcome to the year 1500
Welcome to the year 1500
Welcome to the year 1500
Welcome to the year 1500
Welcome to the year 1500
Welcome to the year 1500
Welcome to the year 1500
Welcome to the year 1500
Welcome to the year 1500
Welcome to the year 1500
Welcome to the year 1500
Welcome to the year 1500
Welcome to the year 1500
Welcome to the year 1500
Welcome to the year 1500
Welcome to the year 1500
Welcome to the year 1500
Welcome to the year 1500
Welcome to the year 1500
Welcome to the year 1500
Welcome to the year 1500
Welcome to the year 1500
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Welcome to the year 1500

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The latter-day Gutenbergs’ work is done. What will the future look like? Some thoughts on the fate of journalism …

The latter-day Gutenbergs’ work is done. What will the future look like? Some thoughts on the fate of journalism

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  • 1. Welcome to the year 1500 The latter-day Gutenbergs’ work is done. What will the future look like?
  • 2. Thinking the unthinkable • Clay Shirky argues we’re in a revolutionary era with no easy solutions
  • 3. Thinking the unthinkable • Clay Shirky argues we’re in a revolutionary era with no easy solutions • It took many decades for Gutenberg’s press to redefine the culture
  • 4. Thinking the unthinkable • Clay Shirky argues we’re in a revolutionary era with no easy solutions • It took many decades for Gutenberg’s press to redefine the culture • No single thing will work, but many ideas might save journalism
  • 5. An experiment winds down • John Paton of Digital First Media tried to redefine newspapers
  • 6. An experiment winds down • John Paton of Digital First Media tried to redefine newspapers • Project Thunderdome, DFM’s innovation lab, was suddenly closed
  • 7. An experiment winds down • John Paton of Digital First Media tried to redefine newspapers • Project Thunderdome, DFM’s innovation lab, was suddenly closed • Investors want their money, so papers are likely to be auctioned
  • 8. The view from New Haven • From bankruptcy and barbed wire to a sense of cautious optimism
  • 9. The view from New Haven • From bankruptcy and barbed wire to a sense of cautious optimism • Some improvements, but more layoffs and slow progress
  • 10. The view from New Haven • From bankruptcy and barbed wire to a sense of cautious optimism • Some improvements, but more layoffs and slow progress • Register backs out of deal to relocate downtown near Omni
  • 11. Future of regional dailies • The New Haven Register may join the Providence Journal and the Telegram & Gazette of Worcester in seeking local owners
  • 12. Future of regional dailies • The New Haven Register may join the Providence Journal and the Telegram & Gazette of Worcester in seeking local owners • Smaller papers should be cheap. But can local business leaders invest money needed to rebuild tattered brands?
  • 13. Future of regional dailies • The New Haven Register may join the Providence Journal and the Telegram & Gazette of Worcester in seeking local owners • Smaller papers should be cheap. But can local business leaders invest money needed to rebuild tattered brands? • On the other hand, if these papers can be operated without debt, they could enjoy a renaissance
  • 14. Marty Baron’s listicle • In speech on April 5, the veteran editor offered nine reasons for hope
  • 15. Marty Baron’s listicle • In speech on April 5, the veteran editor offered nine reasons for hope • “I … choose to be optimistic because only as an optimist can I envision a route to success.”
  • 16. 1. We’re still here • Not long ago, skeptics predicted the end for such major newspapers as The New York Times, The Boston Globe and the Los Angeles Times
  • 17. 2. New owners with money • Jeff Bezos, John Henry and Aaron Kushner are bringing deep pockets and new energy to the task of reinvigorating legacy newspapers
  • 18. 3. New journalistic organizations • Vox, FiveThirtyEight and Re/Code split off from The Washington Post, The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal • Entrepreneurial journalism, whether it succeeds or not, will accelerate the pace of reinvention
  • 19. 3. New journalistic organizations • Vox, FiveThirtyEight and Re/Code split off from The Washington Post, The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal • Entrepreneurial journalism, whether it succeeds or not, will accelerate the pace of reinvention
  • 20. 4. New forms of storytelling • Data visualization, lists, video and other innovations are leading to an audience that is more engaged with journalism
  • 21. 5. We’re better listeners • Business challenges have made us more attuned to what engages our customers
  • 22. 6. New opportunities • Legacy news organizations — not just entrepreneurial start-ups — are hiring people with technical skills such as coding or video
  • 23. 7. The rise of digital natives • Young journalists grew up speaking the language of the Internet, and they are now moving into key newsroom positions
  • 24. 8. Strong journalism persists • Public service reporting by mid-size papers such as the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, The Sacramento Bee and The Boston Globe continues to make a difference
  • 25. 9. Optimism is necessary • “There is no acceptable alternative to optimism”

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