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AP Stylebook highlights
 

AP Stylebook highlights

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This will tell you 90 percent (not % or per cent) of what you need to know.

This will tell you 90 percent (not % or per cent) of what you need to know.

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    AP Stylebook highlights AP Stylebook highlights Presentation Transcript

    • AP Stylebook highlightsThis will tell you 90 percent (not % or per cent) of what you need to know
    • 1. States• We do not use postal abbreviations. Instead, we use old-fashioned abbreviations such as Mass. for Massachusetts.
    • 1. States• We do not use postal abbreviations. Instead, we use old-fashioned abbreviations such as Mass. for Massachusetts.• Abbreviated state names do not stand alone. – She has lived in Concord, Mass., all her life. – She has always lived in Massachusetts.
    • 2. Cities• Most cities and towns are also identified by state. For example, Annapolis, Md.
    • 2. Cities• Most cities and towns are also identified by state. For example, Annapolis, Md.• Many large cities do not need a state whether it is in the dateline or within the article. – Wrong: Washington, D.C. – Wicked wrong: Washington, DC – Right: Washington
    • 3. Numerals• Spell out numbers from zero through nine and use numerals for 10 and up.
    • 3. Numerals• Spell out numbers from zero through nine and use numerals for 10 and up.• Ages are always rendered as numerals: the 5-year-old boy.
    • 3. Numerals• Spell out numbers from zero through nine and use numerals for 10 and up.• Ages are always rendered as numerals: the 5-year-old boy.• Percentages are spelled out with a numeral: 6 percent.
    • 3. Numerals• Spell out numbers from zero through nine and use numerals for 10 and up.• Ages are always rendered as numerals: the 5-year-old boy.• Percentages are spelled out with a numeral: 6 percent.• Numerals with millions and billions: 7 million, 4.8 billion.
    • 3. Numerals• Use numerals for large numbers lower than 1 million: 3,750 for example, or 375,000.• Money always takes a dollar sign, even when you are quoting someone: – 46 cents (no cent sign) – $46 – $4,600 – $4.6 million
    • 4. Politics• Wrong: US Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) was elected to the seat once held by Ted Kennedy.
    • 4. Politics• Wrong: US Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) was elected to the seat once held by Ted Kennedy.• Right: U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D- Mass., was elected to the seat once held by Ted Kennedy.
    • 4. Politics• We refer to President Barack Obama (including first name on first reference), but to the president when there’s no name.
    • 4. Politics• Official titles are capitalized when they appear before a name, but lowercased when used after a name. – Right: Secretary of State John Kerry took office shortly after Hillary Clinton stepped down. – Right: John Kerry, secretary of state, took office shortly after Hillary Clinton stepped down.
    • 4. Politics• Unofficial titles are akin to job descriptions, and are lowercased whether they appear before or after a person’s name. – Right: Romney senior strategist Eric Fehrnstrom had previously worked as a reporter for the Boston Herald.
    • 5. Our country• Spell out United States whenever it is used as a noun. – Energy prices in the United States tend to fluctuate depending on economic activity.
    • 5. Our country• Spell out United States whenever it is used as a noun.• The abbreviation U.S. is sufficient when used as an adjective. – The U.S. economy has a major effect on energy prices.
    • 5. Our country• Spell out United States whenever it is used as a noun.• The abbreviation U.S. is sufficient when used as an adjective.• The abbreviation US is always wrong. Two- letter abbreviations take periods (except AP).
    • 6. Punctuation• Commas and periods go inside quotation marks. – Wrong: The author will read from his new book, “Getting Rich”, today at 3 p.m. – Right: The author will read from his new book, “Getting Rich,” today at 3 p.m.
    • 6. Punctuation• Colons and semicolons generally go outside the quotation marks. – We must read three novels over the summer: Herman Melville’s masterpiece, “Moby Dick”; a 1920s classic by F. Scott Fitzgerald, “This Side of Paradise”; and Ernest Hemingway’s last major work, “The Old Man and the Sea.”
    • 6. Punctuation• With question marks and exclamation points, it depends on the context. – “Why is it taking so long to get there?” she asked. – Have you ever read “Moby Dick”?
    • 6. Punctuation• We use double quotes in all cases unless we need to use them inside quotation marks. – “He said we must read ‘Moby Dick’ before the end of the semester.” – Wrong: The sign said ‘Exit’ in bright red lights. – Right: The sign said “Exit” in bright red lights.
    • 6. Punctuation• We use double quotes in all cases unless we need to use them inside quotation marks.• No serial (Oxford) commas. – Wrong: Tom, Dick, and Harry. – Right: Tom, Dick and Harry.
    • 6. Punctuation• We use double quotes in all cases unless we need to use them inside quotation marks.• No serial (Oxford) commas.• No commas with Jr. – Wrong: Ken Griffey, Jr., was the greatest player of his era until injuries slowed him down. – Wicked wrong: Ken Griffey, Jr. was the greatest player of his era until injuries slowed him down.
    • 6. Punctuation• We use double quotes in all cases unless we need to use them inside quotation marks.• No serial (Oxford) commas.• No commas with Jr. – Right: Ken Griffey Jr. was the greatest player of his era until injuries slowed him down.
    • 7. Time• 1 p.m. or 10:15 a.m. Not 1 o’clock in the afternoon or a quarter after 10 in the morning.
    • 7. Time• 1 p.m. or 10:15 a.m. Not 1 o’clock in the afternoon or a quarter after 10 in the morning.• Midnight and noon are rendered just like that, without a 12. – The Rotary Club will meet from noon to 1:30 p.m.
    • 7. Time• Months are spelled out when used without a date. – She is hoping to take two weeks off in August.
    • 7. Time• Months are spelled out when used without a date. – She is hoping to take two weeks off in August.• Months are abbreviated when used with a date. – She plans to begin her vacation on Aug. 13. (Please note that it’s not 13th.)
    • 7. Time• Months are spelled out when used without a date. – She is hoping to take two weeks off in August.• Months are abbreviated when used with a date. – She plans to begin her vacation on Aug. 13. (Please note that it’s not 13th.)• We do not specify the year unless it’s in the past or the future.
    • 8. Addresses• Street names are spelled out when not used with a specific address. – He lives on Whalley Avenue.
    • 8. Addresses• Street names are spelled out when not used with a specific address. – He lives on Whalley Avenue.• Street names are abbreviated when used with a specific address. – He lives at 7 Whalley Ave.
    • 8. Addresses• Street names are spelled out when not used with a specific address.• Street names are abbreviated when used with a specific address.
    • 8. Addresses• Street names are spelled out when not used with a specific address.• Street names are abbreviated when used with a specific address.• Some types of streets are always spelled out, the most common example of which is road.
    • 8. Addresses• Street names are spelled out when not used with a specific address.• Street names are abbreviated when used with a specific address.• Some types of streets are always spelled out, the most common example of which is road.• Lowercase when referring to more than one. – The intersection of Smith and Jones streets. – The intersection of Smith Street and Jones Road.
    • 9. Possessives• Some style guides form the possessive of a proper name ending in s with ’s. – Fred Jones’s car is a rusting hulk of metal and random wires.
    • 9. Possessives• Some style guides form the possessive of a proper name ending in s with ’s. – Fred Jones’s car is a rusting hulk of metal and random wires.• AP style eliminates the s. – Fred Jones’ car is a rusting hulk of metal and random wires.
    • 10. Titles• AP style does not use italics at all except, incongruously enough, in the AP Stylebook.
    • 10. Titles• The names of newspapers, websites and magazines are rendered without any punctuation. – The Boston Globe (capitalize The because it is part of the name; always check) – Gawker – Entertainment Weekly – Talking Points Memo
    • 10. Titles• The names of books, movies, TV shows, albums, songs, video games and the like should be in quotation marks. – “Lincoln” – “In Cold Blood” – “30 Rock” – “Call of Duty: Black Ops” – “Highway 61 Revisited”
    • Must-read stylebook entries• abbreviations• capitalization• datelines• essential clauses/nonessential clauses• essential phrases/nonessential phrases• numerals• possessives• A Guide to Punctuation
    • On Twitter@APStylebook@FakeAPStylebook
    • Credit• This presentation is based on the short guide to AP style in “Reporting for the Media” (ninth edition), by Bender, Davenport, Drager and Fedler.