Chapter 7 questioning

981 views
870 views

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
981
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
53
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
22
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Chapter 7 questioning

  1. 1. Chap 7.<br />Effective Questioning <br />SCED 570, Fall 2011<br />
  2. 2. Questioning: an essential tool<br />Strategic questioning: selecting and using specific types of questions. <br />Researchers have created a variety of ways to categorize types of questions:<br />Bloom’s Taxonomy<br />Socratic Questioning<br />Productive questions (Martens, 1999)<br />Blosser’sQuestion Category System for Science (QCSS, 1973)<br />
  3. 3. Bloom’s Taxonomy<br />Knowledge <br />Comprehension<br />Application<br />Analysis<br />Synthesis<br />Evaluation <br />
  4. 4. Socratic Questioning<br />conceptual clarification questions(Why are you saying that? What exactly does this mean? )<br />probing assumptions (How can you verify or disprove that assumption? What would happen if ... ? )<br />probing rationale, reasons and evidence (What do you think causes ... ? What is the nature of this? )<br />questioning viewpoints and perspectives (Why it is ... necessary? Who benefits from this? )<br />probe implications and consequences (What are the implications of ... ? How does ... affect ... ? )<br />questions about the question (Why do you think I asked this question?What does that mean? )<br />From http://changingminds.org/techniques/questioning/socratic_questions.htm<br />
  5. 5. QCSS (Blosser, 1973)<br />Closed Questions<br />Memory<br />Convergent thinking <br />Open (open-ended) Questions<br />Evaluative<br />Divergent thinking <br />Managerial<br />Rhetoricalhttp://www.narst.org/publications/research/question.cfm<br />
  6. 6. Types of Questions<br />Research reveals a high frequency of basic questioning in the classroom:<br />Rhetorical – “Are we all here?”<br />“Read-it-and-repeat-it”<br />Lower level thinking without further development<br />More open-ended questions:<br />More thoughtful responses<br />Stimulate discussion <br />
  7. 7. Inquiry & Questioning<br />Questioning can lead to deeper inquiry experiences. “feedback loop”<br />1- Teachers ask questions to elicit levels of student understanding<br />2- Students respond- orally, diagram, drawings<br />3- Teachers recognize and acknowledge student responses.<br />4- Teachers provide scaffolds to improve learning and understanding.<br />
  8. 8. Inquiry & Questioning<br />5-E Model Table 7-1 (p. 188)Engage- Initiate InquiryExplore- Guide Discussions of ObservationsExplain- Guide Discussions of ExplanationsElaborate- Guide Discussions of Applications to New Situations<br />Questions to promote inquiry <br />http://tlc.ousd.k12.ca.us/~acody/inquiryquery.html<br />
  9. 9. Respond to students (Table 7-2 p.195) <br />Accept student responses<br />Acknowledge, reinforce, repeat<br />Establish safe learning environment<br />Extend student responses<br />Build on, compare, apply, summarize <br />Probe student responses <br />Go beyond superficial responses <br />Build on ideas, clarify, justify, verify <br />
  10. 10. Final thoughts<br />Questions need to serve a purpose and reflect a genuine intent to promote learning.<br />Wait time supports processing, increases participation, positive for students.<br />Fade teachers’ questioning support; develop students’ metacognition<br />Broaden questioning repertoire <br />Support critical thinking skills<br />Support inquiry in the science classroom<br />

×