• Like
Chap18 19
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

Published

 

Published in Business , Technology
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
98
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1.  Identify the methods used to acquire media objects for animation sequences
  • 2. In This Chapter, you’ll learn on:  Select a series of images to convey a sequence  Acquire images based on specific time intervals using a digital camera.  Acquire images from a video source based on a specific action.
  • 3. Animation  An animation is a sequence or series of images, or frames that is displayed over time. Each frame varies slightly from the preceding frame, creating the illusion of movement when the frames are viewed in quick succession.  There are a few methods on how you can create an animation, and there are certain technical names depending on the technique and approach you used. Frame with changes is known as a keyframe, the sequence of images will form the animation
  • 4. Traditional animation  Traditional animation (also called cel animation or hand- drawn animation) was the process used for most animated films of the 20th century. The individual frames of a traditionally animated film are photographs of drawings, which are first drawn on paper.  To create the illusion of movement, each drawing differs slightly from the one before it. The animators' drawings are traced or photocopied onto transparent acetate sheets called cels, which are filled in with paints in assigned colors or tones on the side opposite the line drawings. The completed character cels are photographed one-by-one onto motion picture film against a painted background by a rostrum camera.
  • 5. 2D animation  2D animation figures are created and/or edited on the computer using 2D bitmap graphics or created and edited using 2D vector graphics.  This includes automated computerized versions of traditional animation techniques such as interpolated morphing, onion skinning and interpolated rotoscoping. 2D animation can be created with software like Flash, Adobe Photoshop.
  • 6. 3D animation  3D animation is digitally modeled and manipulated by an animator. In order to manipulate a mesh, it is given a digital skeletal structure that can be used to control the mesh. This process is called rigging. Various other techniques can be applied, such as mathematical functions (ex. gravity, particle simulations), simulated fur or hair, effects such as fire and water and the use of motion capture to name but a few, these techniques fall under the category of 3D dynamics. Well-made 3D animations can be difficult to distinguish from live action and are commonly used as visual effects for recent movies. Toy Story (1995, USA) is the first feature-length film to be created and rendered entirely using 3D graphics.
  • 7. Drawn-on-film animation  Drawn-on-film animation or direct animation is also known as animation without camera. This animation technique where footage is produced by creating the images directly on film stock, as opposed to any other form of animation where the images or objects are photographed frame by frame with an animation camera.
  • 8. Stop Motion  Stop motion is an animation technique to make a physically manipulated object appear to move on its own.  The object is moved in small increments between individually photographed frames, creating the illusion of movement when the series of frames is played as a continuous sequence. Clay figures are often used in stop motion for their ease of repositioning. Motion animation using clay is called clay animation or clay-mation.
  • 9. Some types of stop motion  Puppet animation typically involves stop-motion puppet figures interacting with each other in a constructed environment, in contrast to the real-world interaction in model animation.  Clay animation, or Plasticine animation often abbreviated as claymation, uses figures made of clay or a similar malleable material to create stop-motion animation.  Cutout animation is a type of stop-motion animation produced by moving 2-dimensional pieces of material such as paper or cloth.  Silhouette animation is a variant of cutout animation in which the characters are backlit and only visible as silhouettes