</NMOTION        ROBOTS               FOR REHABILITATION   InMotion Robot Therapy   ••••         ••••••          • •••••••...
</NMOOON       ROBOTS                FOR REHABILITATION   InMotion Robot Therapy   ••••         ••••••          • ••••••••...
InMotion Arm Robot:improving quality of lifeRecovering everyday functionAfter years of living with movement disabilities p...
InMotion Wrist Robot:improving       quality of lifeRecovering everyday functionWith 3 Degrees of movement, engaging softw...
impairment six months or more after stroke. Patients were placed into three study groups: usual care, intensive comparison...
<1NMOOON       ROBOTS                 FOR REHABILITATION   InMotion Robot Therapy   ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••        ...
NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF MEDICINE                                      1   _ ~ l~. )~.   J   ..."  Interactive-Motion Techno...
•   InMotion Robots at Braintree, MA Rehab Hospital    •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••    ...
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  1. 1. </NMOTION ROBOTS FOR REHABILITATION InMotion Robot Therapy •••• •••••• • ••••••••••••••• Watertown, MA - May 13,2010 - Patients with long-term stroke reported reduced impairment, disability, and improved quality of life following InMotion robot-assisted therapy, according to a Veterans Administration (VA) led study published in the May 13,2010 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine. "There are nearly 6 Million stroke patients in the u.s. with chronic deficits; says Dr. Albert Lo, a neurologist at the Providence VA Medical Center who led the study. "Weve shown that with the right therapy, they can see improvements in movement, everyday function and quality of life: The study demonstrates that InMotion robots are safe and effective clinical tools they can assist a Physical or Occupational therapist achieve the intense level of exercise necessary to achieve neuro- plastic change and motor recovery following stroke, even years post-stroke. "Robotics and automation technology are ideal for these kinds of highly repetitive tasks. Weve used robotic technology to create a tool for the therapist to afford this kind of high-intensity therapy while maintaining the therapist supervisory role, deciding what is right for a particular patients needs and tailoring therapy according to findings from the patient evaluation tools provided with the robots" says Hermano Igo Krebs, principal research scientist in MITs Department of Mechanical Engineering and inventor of InMotion robots. "The study results also challenge the notion that physical therapy only benefits stroke patients within the first six months after stroke" says La. The VA-led randomized clinical trial, conducted at 4 hospitals, involved 127 patients with moderate to very severe arm impairment six months or more after stroke. Patients were placed into three study groups: usual care, intensive comparison therapy administered using conventional techniques, and intensive robot-assisted therapy. At 36 weeks, patients in the two intensive groups demonstrated significantly more improvement in function, movement and quality of life than patients receiving usual care. These patients received hour-long treatment sessions three times per week and completed 1,024 exercise repetitions in each session. Patients in the robot-assisted therapy group completed the exercises using four different types of InMotion upper-extremity robots. The robots guide patients through exercise using video game-like software programs and the robot arm assists the person with movement only when they are unable to initiate or complete the motion themselves. Patients randomized to the intensive comparison therapy by a therapist also received very intensive arm exercise, comparable to the 1,024 movements per 1-hour therapy, something that is typically not practical in everyday care (typical exercise repetitions are closer to 40 movements per session). Even more surprising, this better care did not cost the VA any more than usual care: "better care for the same cost: Professor Neville Hogan and Hermano Igo Krebs, from the Newman Laboratory for Biomechanics and Human Reha!:>i1itation,invented the InMotion Robots and have been involved in over a decade and half of research using this kind of interactive robotics.
  2. 2. </NMOOON ROBOTS FOR REHABILITATION InMotion Robot Therapy •••• •••••• • ••••••••••••••• Watertown, MA - May 13,2010 - Patients with long-term stroke reported reduced impairment, disability, and improved quality of life following InMotion robot-assisted therapy, according to a Veterans Administration (VA) led study published in the May 13,2010 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine. "There are nearly 6 Million stroke patients in the u.s. with chronic deficits; says Dr. Albert Lo, a neurologist at the Providence VA Medical Center who led the study. "Weve shown that with the right therapy, they can see improvements in movement, everyday function and quality of life: The study demonstrates that InMotion robots are safe and effective clinical tools they can assist a Physical or Occupational therapist achieve the intense level of exercise necessary to achieve neuro- plastic change and motor recovery following stroke, even years post-stroke. "Robotics and automation technology are ideal for these kinds of highly repetitive tasks. Weve used robotic technology to create a tool for the therapist to afford this kind of high-intensity therapy while maintaining the therapist supervisory role, deciding what is right for a particular patients needs and tailoring therapy according to findings from the patient evaluation tools provided with the robots" says Hermano Igo Krebs, principal research scientist in MITs Department of Mechanical Engineering and inventor of InMotion robots. "The study results also challenge the notion that physical therapy only benefits stroke patients within the first six months after stroke" says Lo. The VA-led randomized clinical trial, conducted at 4 hospitals, involved 127 patients with moderate to very severe arm impairment six months or more after stroke. Patients were placed into three study groups: usual care, intensive comparison therapy administered using conventional techniques, and intensive robot-assisted therapy. At 36 weeks, patients in the two intensive groups demonstrated significantly more improvement in function, movement and quality of life than patients receiving usual care. These patients received hour-long treatment sessions three times per week and completed 1,024 exercise repetitions in each session. Patients in the robot-assisted therapy group completed the exercises using four different types of InMotion upper-extremity robots. The robots guide patients through exercise using video game-like software programs and the robot arm assists the person with movement only when they are unable to initiate or complete the motion themselves. Patients randomized to the intensive comparison therapy by a therapist also received very intensive arm exercise, comparable to the 1,024 movements per 1-hour therapy, something that is typically not practical in everyday care (typical exercise repetitions are closer to 40 movements per session). Even more surprising, this better care did not cost the VA any more than usual care: "better care for the same cost: Professor Neville Hogan and Hermano Igo Krebs, from the Newman Laboratory for Biomechanics and Human Reha.t>i1itation,invented the InMotion Robots and have been involved in over a decade and half of research using this kind of interactive robotics.
  3. 3. InMotion Arm Robot:improving quality of lifeRecovering everyday functionAfter years of living with movement disabilities patients and their doctorsdiscover that there is hope. What was thought to have been permanentcan be restored. The coordinated shoulder, elbow and hand movementsrequired for accurate reaching and grasping are retrained.Rethinking recoveryIn-Motion Robot-assisted therapy engages the patient to "retrain thebrain". The patient is actively expressing and experiencing thousands ofinteractive movement repetitions, leading to the achievement of meaning-ful movement in everyday arm function even years post onset.Redefining the standard of careA new therapeutic strategy; evidence based technology which is proven tobe effective and safe. Currently used by leading clinicians and research-ers worldwide. Reach for recovery
  4. 4. InMotion Wrist Robot:improving quality of lifeRecovering everyday functionWith 3 Degrees of movement, engaging software, visual feedback, and task-oriented exercises; Robotic Therapy gently assists and guides the patient tosignificant functional improvement leading to Real Recovery.Rethinking recoveryIn-Motion Robot-assisted therapy engages the patient to "retrain the brain".The patient is actively expressing and experiencing thousands of movementrepetitions, leading to the achievement of meaningful movement in everydaywrist function even years post onset.Redefining the standard of careA new therapeutic strategy; evidence based technology which is proven to beeffective and safe. Currently used by leading clinicians and researchers worldwide. Reach for recovery
  5. 5. impairment six months or more after stroke. Patients were placed into three study groups: usual care, intensive comparisontherapy administered using conventional techniques, and intensive robot-assisted therapy.At 36 weeks, patients in the two intensive groups demonstrated significantly more improvement in function, movementand quality of life than patients receiving usual care. These patients received hour-long treatment sessions three times perweeI<and completed 1,024 exercise repetitions in each session.Patients in the robot-assisted therapy group completed the exercises using four different types of InMotion upper-extremityrobots. The robots guide patients through exercise using video game-like software programs and the robot arm assists theperson with movement only when they are unable to initiate or complete the motion themselves.Patients randomized to the intensive comparison therapy by a therapist also received very intensive arm exercise,comparable to the 1,024 movements per 1-hour therapy, something that is typically not practical in everydaycare (typical exercise repetitions are closer to 40 movements per session).Even more surprising, this better care did not cost the VA any more than usual care: "better carefor the same cost:Professor Neville Hogan and Hermano Igo Krebs, from the Newman Laboratory for Biomechanics andHuman Re.babilitation, invented the InMotion Robots and have been involved in over a decade and halfof research using this kind of interactive robotics.
  6. 6. <1NMOOON ROBOTS FOR REHABILITATION InMotion Robot Therapy •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• Watertown, MA - May 13,2010 - Patients with long-term stroke reported reduced impairment, disability, and improved quality of life following InMotion robot-assisted therapy, according to a Veterans Administration (VA) led study published in the May 13, 2010 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine. "There are nearly 6 Million stroke patients in the U.S.with chronic deficits; says Dr. Albert Lo, a neurologist at the Providence VA Medical Center who led the study. "Weve shown that with the right therapy, they can see improvements in movement, everyday function and quality of life: The study demonstrates that InMotion robots are safe and effective clinical tools they can assist a Physical or Occupational therapist achieve the intense level of exercise necessary to achieve neuro- plastic change and motor recovery following stroke, even years post-stroke. "Robotics and automation technology are ideal for these kinds of highly repetitive tasks. Weve used robotic technology to create a tool for the therapist to afford this kind of high-intensity therapy while maintaining the therapist supervisory role, deciding what is right for a particular patients needs and tailoring therapy according to findings from the patient evaluation tools provided with the robots" says Hermano Igo Krebs, principal research scientist in MIls Department of Mechanical Engineering and inventor of InMotion robots. "The study results also challenge the notion that physical therapy only benefits stroke patients within the first six months after stroke" says Lo. The VA-led randomized clinical trial, conducted at 4 hospitals, involved 127 patients with moderate to very severe arm impairment six months or more after stroke. Patients were placed into three study groups: usual care, intensive comparison therapy administered using conventional techniques, and intensive robot-assisted therapy. At 36 weeks, patients in the two intensive groups demonstrated significantly more improvement in function, movement and quality of life than patients receiving usual care. These patients received hour-long treatment sessions three times per week and completed 1,024 exercise repetitions in each session. Patients in the robot-assisted therapy group completed the exercises using four different types of InMotion upper-extremity robots. The robots guide patients through exercise using video game-like sohware programs and the robot arm assists the person with movement only when they are unable to initiate or complete the motion themselves. Patients randomized to the intensive comparison therapy by a therapist also received very intensive arm exercise, comparable to the 1,024 movements per 1-hour therapy, something that is typically not practical in everyday care (typical exercise repetitions are closer to 40 movements per session). Even more surprising, this better care did not cost the VA any more than usual care: "better care for the same cost: Professor Neville Hogan and Hermano Igo Krebs, from the Newman Laboratory for Biomechanics and Human Re.babilitation, invented the InMotion Robots and have been involved in over a decade and half of research using this kind of interactive robotics.
  7. 7. NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF MEDICINE 1 _ ~ l~. )~. J ..." Interactive-Motion Technologies is pleased to announce <INSPIRATION Lewis M. Nashner as new President and CEO. Robotics help Lew comes to IMT with extensive experience in leading the commercial Tappan girl move again development of computerized equipment for rehabilitation of sensory and motor system disorders. Prior to joining IMT, Lew founded and for 25 years served as the Chairman and CEO of Neurocom International, Inc. Neurocom was sold to Natus Biomedical, a NASDAQ company, in 2008. Under his leadership, Neurocom grew from a small company marketing to academic research centers to the worldwide market leader in rehabilitation equipment for managing balance and related mobility disorders. Today, its equipment is in broad use in not only academic institutions but also in medical centers, small community hospitals, and private practices. Its equipment is distributed throughout the developed world. "At this point, Im a firm believer that therapy is going to help her to Prior to founding Neurocom, Lew was a research scientist at the Neuro- regain everything she lost" logical Sciences Institute at the Oregon Health and Sciences University. During his tenure as a researcher, Lew published over 70 original articles To her mother, her special-education and book chapters in the field of human movement and balance control. teacher and her therapists, watching 8-year-old Heather Matthews use both Lew earned BS and MS degrees in Aeronautics and Astronautics from the hands to cut out magazine pictures and Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His ScD degree, also from MIT, glue them onto paper is like watching a focused on automatic control systems, systems engineering, and neuro- miracle unfold. science. Neville Hogan, one of the founders of IMT, and Lew were fellow graduate students at MIT in related areas of human neuroscience. Heathers left side has been paralyzed since she was an infant. About 18 months ago, she qualified for an experimental pro- Lew believes that IMTs innovative robotic rehabilitation technology has gram at Blythedale Childrens Hospital in great potential to improve the quality of care for patients with limb paresis Valhalla using MIT-created robots to move secondary to stroke and other traumatic and degenerative brain injuries. her left arm in a circle hundreds of times To realize its full potential, his major focus will be developing the mar- to see if it would help return movement to keting, customer education, and sales programs necessary to bring the her left side. companys technology into broad clinical use. The results have been outstanding, said Donna Matthews of Tappan, Heathers mother. Two days before her First Com- munion in May, Heather raised her left arm IN TERA(T1V MOTION as high as her ear - the first time she had TECH NOLDe IES, INC done so since she was 17 months old.80 Coolidge H111 RoadWatertown MA, 02472p: 617 926 4800 f: 617 926 4808www.interactive-motion.com
  8. 8. • InMotion Robots at Braintree, MA Rehab Hospital ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• a physical therapist and stroke survivor Hypertonia had severely affected her who uses the InMotion robots during his left arm, but she had learned to com- own outpatient therapy. In addition, a pensate with the other side. She had therapist can see how much assistance worked with the robot for some time the patient needs, helping to assess when one night she walked into her improvement. bedroom. Her husband, walking behind her, started shouting, "You turned on the Working with the InMotion robot re- light! You turned on the light!" Subcon- quires attention, eye-hand coordination, sciously, she had turned on the light and coordination of the affected arm, with her affected arm rather than com- but patients are often so engrossed in pensating by turning her body to use the "As therapists we think, How do I tap the game - for example, a game of on- other side. into the motor control theory - getting screen ping-pong - they end up doing patients to do a high number of repeti- a few hundred repetitions of a particular tions in an engaging activity? How many movement - a result that is challenging ItInMotion robots help us times can I ask them to reach for a cone to elicit during traditional therapy. "Im while sitting on a mat?" said Dan Par- get to the high number of not saying weve abandoned cones and kinson, PT, Director of Clinical Services repetitions while keeping bean bags, but the InMotion robots help at Braintree Rehabilitation Hospital, us get to the high number of repetitions patients motivated. " provider of acute inpatient and outpa- while keeping patients motivated," said tient rehabilitation in Braintree, Mass. Parkinson. and surrounding communities. Patients with various neurological condi- Solution: tions, from stroke to spinal cord to brain Braintree believes that their investment Robotic Therapy injuries, work with the robots. Beth Lus, in InMotion and other rehab technol- aT, occupational therapy clinical advisor ogy has made a favorable impact on Always looking for the latest proven at Braintree Rehab, has even used it the hospital. "It is hard to attribute any technologies in rehabilitation, Brain- with patients with flaccidity. Lus also specific initiative to inpatient volume tree Rehab purchased the InMotion uses it with patients who have neglect growth, however Braintree believes shoulder-elbow robot, wrist robot and or attention issues. "There have been evidence-based technology has helped hand robot to augment its arsenal of patients who do not attend well with to increase admissions of neurologic evidence-based treatment tools. They other therapy, but Ive put them on the patients for both inpatient and outpatient were drawn to the InMotion therapy ro- robot and they can focus on the task for programs", says Parkinson. "Technol- bots for a few reasons - one of the most 20 minutes," Lus said. ogy has also helped with our therapist significant being the ability to provide active-assisted motion for the patient. recruitment and retention. Our clinical The robot can back off proportionate staff is excited about contributing to the development of clinical applications for to the patients changing ability to move Vartanian has noticed functional gains rehab technology. Braintree is proud independently. Because the machine around the house -- unloading the dish- that we can offer patients such innova- helps to stabilize the affected arm, washer, folding clothes, and opening tive treatment." movement is more fluid and controlled. bottles. And Parkinson likes to tell of a "You dont get frustrated that your arm is 42-year-old woman who was 21 years allover the place," said Rich Vartanian, post-stroke. Founded in 1975, Braintree rehabilitation Hospital has gained recognition as a world-class healthcare provider. Braintree offers a wide variety of specialty programs at its acute Inpatient Rehabilitation Hosptial in Braintree, MA, satellite rehabilitation hospital located ~t Medtrowest Medical Center in Natik, MA and multiple community-based outpatient clinics. Braintree is a leading provider of Nuerorehabilitation services such as Stroke, Brain Injury, Parkinsons Disease, Multiple Sclerosis and Spi- nal Cord Injury. The Join Commission awarded the hospital Disease Specific Care Certification for its Stroke and Brain Injury programs.---------------------------

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