Elevator speech
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Elevator speech

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  • Will you be prepared if you see your superintendent or a school board member standing alone somewhere like the grocery store or walking down the street? You have a captive audience for 30 seconds. Take advantage of it. In some communities you may bump into a stakeholder at a sports event, at the dentist’s office, or at a school event such as a book fair.  In this age of sound bites, having an “elevator speech” readily available, fluent, and practiced is critical for those potential opportunities. Taking the time of thinking about what you would say if you had someone’s attention is useful because it helps us to reflect on what we value and, in crisis times, what others value . Pre-thinking a concise, simple message is often not easy and requires contemplation. Examples of elevator speeches ( http://www.ala.org/aasl/aaslissues/toolkits/slroleinreading/elevatorspeech ) about the school librarian’s role in reading, discuss how each targets a specific stakeholder group.
  • Potential elevator speeches targeted to a specific stakeholder: To a teacher: “Co-teaching reduces our workload and provides students with more individualized instruction” To an administrator: “Studies have shown that school libraries can improve student test scores.” To a parent: “The library program can help your teen become career and college ready.” To a school board member: “It is difficult to help students achieve the reading targets without the kind of books that students want to read.” Include some statistics: # of students, $ per student, cost of books, etc. compared to neighboring schools. To the curriculum coordinator: How the librarians are aligning information skills and the Common Core and co-teaching with classroom teachers using their content To the Learning Support Coordinator: How the library program meets the needs of different populations: ELL, AP, deficient readers, the handicapped, etc.
  • Examples of “Hooks” – [To a parent] “I’m sure you want your son to be safe on the Internet while finding authoritative information to complete school assignments.” [To a principal] “Providing staff development for teachers on how to use technology and digital resources in their content areas improves instruction for all our students.” Examples of “Proof” – [To a school board member] “A recent research study has shown that students in states that lost librarians tended to have lower reading scores—or had a slower rise on standardized tests—than those in states that gained librarians.” SLJ Sept 2011 (http://www.schoollibraryjournal.com/slj/home/891612-312/something_to_shout_about_new.html.csp) [To a teacher] “When teachers and librarians collaborate on instruction, students have higher test scores.” [Statewide impact studies- California 2006,Idaho 2009, Iowa 2002, and Pennsylvania 2000] Example of “Bring it Home” – [To a legislator] “School districts in your legislative district are cutting library staffing and budgets causing students to have less access to learning and the resources they need.”
  • For example, don’t refer to “my job,” but rather “school librarians…” One minute of practiced information can come in handy, particularly if it is delivered in a conversational manner. 

Elevator speech Elevator speech Presentation Transcript

  • ELEVATOR SPEECHES Use your position statement in elevator speeches as your signature” message. “Stay on message!” An elevator speech is a short, highly focused 30-second way of sharing your message. The name reflects the fact that an elevator speech can be delivered in the time span of an elevator ride (for example, thirty seconds and 100- 150 words). Usually it is unplanned and often a on-on-one conversation. Adapted from Wikipedia  
  • Components of an Elevator Speech • Position Statement • Three supporting points 1. The “Hook” – targeted to the audience or listener 2. The Evidence – proof or research to make it believable 3. “Bring it home” – connection to local setting • Concluding question or “ask” Use supporting points to drill down into needed details to provide a platform for your message. Use an outline format with bullets, if printed.
  • The Three Supporting Points Supporting points further explain your position statement, in some cases, answering how and why. 1. The “HOOK” - Why the listener should care; elaborate on the benefit 2. The PROOF– One sentence with statistics/research to back up your claims or a supporting talking point 3. “BRING IT HOME” - Personalize the issue by talking about your school and students. View slide
  • Ending the Elevator Speech Conclude with an invitation or request. •Ask a legislator to visit your library •Invite parents to attend an Open House program. •Ask to present to the Chamber of Commerce. •Offer to do a presentation to the School Board. •Ask to reconsider a budget or position cut. Follow up with an email or phone call a week later to restate your invitation/request. View slide
  • ELEVATOR SPEECHES TIPS   • Keep it simple, concise, and clear- no more than 150 words; 3 supporting points • Use your own words – no library jargon • Be positive and enthusiastic • Although it is personal; try to keep it professional and as impersonal as possible • Keep it conversational and non-confrontational • Practice and memorize your position statement and the 3 points • Always be prepared! Stay on message-yours! Remember it’s about students & learning, not you!
  • ELEVATOR SPEECHES TIPS   • Keep it simple, concise, and clear- no more than 150 words; 3 supporting points • Use your own words – no library jargon • Be positive and enthusiastic • Although it is personal; try to keep it professional and as impersonal as possible • Keep it conversational and non-confrontational • Practice and memorize your position statement and the 3 points • Always be prepared! Stay on message-yours! Remember it’s about students & learning, not you!