Abstraction rule of thirds

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Abstraction rule of thirds

  1. 1. Abstraction as a means for expression
  2. 2. Abstraction <ul><li>Simplification and/or alternation of forms, derived from actual observation or experiences to present the essence of the objects, people or places. </li></ul>Grey line with Black
  3. 3. Georgia O’Keefe <ul><li>Georgia O’Keefe was born in 1887 and died in 1987, she was almost 100 years old and was still painting up until her death. </li></ul><ul><li>As a child Georgia saw the world around her much differently then most people. </li></ul><ul><li>When she was just twelve years old she decided she would become an artist. </li></ul>Light Iris 1924
  4. 4. <ul><li>She began experimenting with her new view of the world in her high school art class. </li></ul><ul><li>She began simplifying flower shapes until they were hardly recognizable at all, just simply copying the flower was just plain dull to Georgia. </li></ul><ul><li>In her drawings and paintings, the flower became a world to be explored. </li></ul>
  5. 5. <ul><li>Her use of colors and simplified shapes created an abstraction of the flowers. She was just looking for the design and beauty that some people miss altogether. She said she wanted people to be “surprised into taking time to look….. So see what I see of flowers” </li></ul>
  6. 7. Abstraction in Photography
  7. 8. Imogen Cunningham <ul><li>From the earliest years of her career, which began about 1906, until her death in 1976, she explored abstraction thru botanical imagery with intelligence and originality. </li></ul><ul><li>She paired detailed examinations of nature and scientific curiosity with the eloquent creative expression of a true artist. </li></ul><ul><li>Her work is exciting because it avoids vacuous predictability. </li></ul>
  8. 9. <ul><li>The following images date from 1913 through the 1970’s with an emphasis on work from the 1920’s and 1930’s. </li></ul><ul><li>Cunningham’s work with botanical subject matter traces the evolution of her photographic imagery, which closely parallels many of the technical and aesthetic developments of the twentieth century. </li></ul>
  9. 13. Use your imagination: What else could this be?
  10. 14. The Rule of Thirds
  11. 15. Things to remember when composing your image <ul><li>Remember the rule of thirds </li></ul><ul><li>Get close to your subject </li></ul><ul><li>Get rid of all the unnecessary information </li></ul><ul><li>View point is important </li></ul><ul><li>Stay away from the center </li></ul><ul><li>Use the frame </li></ul>

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