Ready To Read For Fr4 K Coaches

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  • Welcome … Hand out nametags.

Transcript

  • 1. Ready to Read: Early Literacy Training for Franklinton Ready 4 K COACHES
  • 2. Project Overview
  • 3. Franklinton Ready 4 K: COACH Expectations
    • Learn about early literacy and getting children ready for Kindergarten
    • Attend monthly sessions, if possible with the parent you are coaching
    • Follow up with your assigned parent by phone or in person. See how they are doing getting their child ready for Kindergarten. Visit your parent in person at least 1 of every 3 months
    • Remind parents of next months workshop
  • 4. Franklinton Background
  • 5. Monthly Parent Training Locations and Times
    • Columbus Metropolitan Library, Franklinton Branch
    • 1061 W Town St , 43222
    • 3 rd Wednesday of month, except December
    • 2 pm
    • Lower Lights Ministries
    • 1066 Bellows Ave
    • 3 rd Monday of Month, except December
    • 7 pm
    • City Life Center
    • 40 Chicago Ave
    • 3 rd _____________ of month, except December
  • 6. Ready to Read: Early Literacy Overview
  • 7. Factors that contribute to a child’s health
    • Good nutrition
    • Stimulating environment
    • Variety of experiences
    • Repetition
    • Feeling good, loved, cared for
    • Lots of reading!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  • 8. Why is it so important to get children “Ready to Read”?
    • 70% of CCS Kindergarten students were not ready to take on the Kindergarten Reading Program during the ’05-’06 school year.
    Knowledge of the alphabet at entry into Kindergarten is a strong predictor of reading ability in the 10th grade.
  • 9. Why promote learning before a child starts school?
    • By age three, brains are twice as active as those of adults.
    • Loving, family relationships affects brain development.
    • Prime time to develop language skills is before age 7.
  • 10. What is early literacy?
    • What children know about reading and writing before they can read or write
  • 11. Six skills every child needs to learn to read; Starting from birth! Phonological Awareness the ability to hear and play with the smaller sounds in words. Narrative Skills the ability to describe things and events and to tell stories. Letter Knowledge learning to name letters. Knowing they have sounds, and recognizing them everywhere. Print Awareness noticing print, knowing how to handle a book, and how to follow the written words on a page. Vocabulary knowing the names of things. Print Motivation a child’s interest in and enjoyment of books. What you do helps your child get ready to read.
  • 12. Reading should be a positive experience
    • Reading should be enjoyable this develops print motivation.
    • Children should associate books with cuddles and love.
    • It is important to make time for reading by shutting off the TV, computer or radio. Eliminate distractions.
  • 13. PRINT MOTIVATION: Loving Books
    • How to do this with Books:
    • Read to a child often, and make it fun!
    • Allow child to turn the pages, pull the flaps
    • Activities parents can do:
    • Pick books with topics that interest their child
    • Pick books that they enjoy – parent’s enthusiasm is contagious
    • Let child pick books
    • Read the book as many times as the child wants
  • 14. Parents should talk with their children
    • One of the early literacy skills children need is a growing vocabulary .
    • Children need to be exposed to many words.
    • Parents should have conversations about books, memories, family history, daily activities to stimulate vocabulary .
    • Toddlers can learn 9 new words per day!!!
  • 15. ALA granted permission from Janellen Huttenlocher.
  • 16. VOCABULARY: Words
    • How to do this with Books:
    • Picture books that introduce new words and ideas
    • Activities parents can do :
    • Introduce new words repeatedly
    • Re-state unfamiliar words in simpler language
    • Ask follow-up questions
    • Label more than just things, label feelings and concepts as well
  • 17.
    • It is best to speak to a child in the language you know.
    Parents should talk to their children in their native language!
  • 18. Parents should sing and rhyme with their children
    • Rhyming and singing builds phonological awareness
    • This is the ability to hear and play with the smaller sounds in words, which helps children sound out words as they begin to read
  • 19. PHONOLOGICAL AWARENESS: Sounds
    • How to do this with Books:
    • Rhyming books
    • Nursery rhymes
    • Poetry
    • Activities parents can do:
    • Sing
    • Share tongue twisters
    • Play “Say It Fast, Say It Slow”
    • Rhyme with your child
    • Share fingerplays
  • 20. Children need to tell their own stories
    • Telling stories enhances children’s narrative skills
    • The ability to describe things and events and to tell stories is N arrative Skills
    • Understanding that stories have a beginning, middle and end helps children to understand what they read
  • 21. NARRATIVE SKILLS: Storytelling
    • How to do this with Books:
    • Choose books with a simple sequence of events
    • Choose books that have a clear beginning, middle and end
    • Activities parents can do:
    • Encourage “book babble”
    • Pause during a book and ask child questions, i.e. “What sound did the first animal make? And the second?”
    • Act out the book using puppets or props
    • Talk about when they were little, or talk about what they’re doing now
    • Listen to their child when they tell tories, and ask for more details
  • 22. Children need to talk about the books they read.
  • 23. Dialogic Reading
    • The more actively involved a child is in the story, the more learning is going on inside his or her mind.
    • How parents can do this while reading:
    • Ask “What do you see in this picture?”
    • Add to what child has just said
    • Ask open questions (not just yes or no answers)
    • How parents can do this when talking:
    • Have two-way conversations. Give child time to answer
    • Listen to their child and ask for more details
  • 24. You’re never too young to enjoy books
    • Young children can make the connection that symbols actually mean something and are not just pictures
    • This is print awareness.
  • 25. PRINT AWARENESS: Using Books
    • How to do this with Books:
    • Point out text or letters that look different than others
    • Point to words as you are reading (especially repeating words)
    • Let child turn the pages
    • Activities parents can do:
    • Hold a book upside down and see if the child notices
    • Read aloud all types of print, i.e. labels, signs, lists and menus
    • Make flashcards
    • Point out signs
  • 26. Children need to know the alphabet
    • Young children can tell that letters are different from each other, and have different sounds.
    • This is letter knowledge.
  • 27. LETTER KNOWLEDGE: ABCs
    • How to do this with Books:
    • Start with simple ABC books
    • Books that emphasize a particular letter or sound
    • Activities parents can do:
    • Point out the first letter of their child’s name and write it
    • Learn shapes to get ready to learn letters
    • Play with toys that encourage touch: play-doh, puzzles, finger paint
    • Provide magnetic letters or foam letters
    • Play games like “I Spy”
  • 28. Six skills every child needs to learn to read; Starting from birth! Phonological Awareness the ability to hear and play with the smaller sounds in words. Narrative Skills the ability to describe things and events and to tell stories. Letter Knowledge learning to name letters. Knowing they have sounds, and recognizing them everywhere. Print Awareness noticing print, knowing how to handle a book, and how to follow the written words on a page. Vocabulary knowing the names of things. Print Motivation a child’s interest in and enjoyment of books. What you do helps your child get ready to read.
  • 29. PARENT WORKSHOPS: Other Topics
    • In addition to early literacy, four other topics will be highlighted at the parent sessions. These are:
      • Getting your child ready for Kindergarten
      • Basic concepts: colors, counting, shapes, opposites
      • Safety (to be covered with Print Awareness)
      • Emotions
  • 30. Workshop Schedule October – Print Motivation November –Concepts (shapes, colors, numbers and counting and opposites) December –OFF January –ABCs February –Vocabulary March –Getting Ready for K April –Print Awareness & Safety May –Emotions June –Narrative Skills July –Dialogic Reading August –Phonological Awareness