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Federation of Diocesan Liturgical Commissions National Meeting, 2012, San Jose, California

Federation of Diocesan Liturgical Commissions National Meeting, 2012, San Jose, California


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  • 1. OCTOBER 9 – 12, 2012SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA
  • 2.  Bob Hurd has served as a teacher, composer and liturgist in variouspastoral and academic settings, including the Franciscan School ofTheology, Berkeley, California, the Graduate Pastoral Ministries Programat Santa Clara University and St. Patrick Seminary, Menlo Park, California.His liturgical music is published by OCP and is featured in numeroushymnals in the United States, Canada, Great Britain and Australia. He hasbeen a contributor to two books: That They Might Have Life: Power,Empowerment and Leadership in the Church (Crossroads, 1991) and TheNew Dictionary of Catholic Spirituality (Michael Downey/Liturgical Press).He has a doctorate from De Paul University in Chicago. Diana Macalintal is the Director of Worship for the Diocese of San Jose inCalifornia and holds a Master of Arts in Theology from Saint JohnsUniversity, Collegeville, Minnesota. She was a contributing author for the 2012 edition ofTogether for Life: Celebrating and Living the Sacrament (Ave Maria Press), The CatholicConnections Handbook for Middle Schoolers, and wrote The Eucharist CatechistsGuide (both Saint Marys Press, 2009). She serves on the board of advisors for theLiturgical Press and for GIA Publications, Inc. In 2003, she received the Federationof Diocesan Liturgical Commissions Tabat Scholarship, and she is a team memberof the North American Forum on the Catechumenate.
  • 3.  Rev. Ricky Manalo, CSP is a presbyter in the Paulist order,which is dedicated to the ministry of evangelization,reconciliation and ecumenism. An accomplished musician,composer, lecturer and author, he specializes in ritual music,liturgical inculturation and spirituality. Ricky has served as liturgical director ofthe Asian/Pacific Apostolate Office of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishopsand as choir and liturgy director of the Washington Theological Union. He is agraduate of the Manhattan School of Music, where he received a bachelor ofmusic in composition. He earned a master’s in theology at the WashingtonTheological Union in Washington, D.C., with a concentration in word andworship. He was recently awarded a doctorate in Asian-American liturgicalstudies at the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley.
  • 4. “Strangers No Longer: Partners in the Promise”Bishop Barnes will share his pastoral and liturgical vision forintercultural worship, especially as he has shaped it in theDiocese of San Bernardino. The goal for this presentation is tohelp liturgists deepen their understanding of and commitment to their role inserving the bishops’ efforts toward unity among their people. Most Reverend Gerald Barnes is Bishop of the Diocese of San Bernardino. He has servedas Chair of the USCCB Committee on Refugees and Migrants. Currently, Bishop Barnes is amember of the USCCB Administrative Committee and the Communication Committee andserves on the USCCB Ad Hoc Committee for the Church in Africa. He is a Board member ofthe Mexican American Cultural Center, Assumption Seminary, and the Inland EmpireHispanic Scholarship Fund.
  • 5. “En las Calles y en Nuestras Casas: Ritualizing theDaily Latinamente”Popular religious expressions, the “faith of the people,” engageaffective, aesthetic, and kinetic dimensions of our humanity,dimensions that have always been important parts of our richfaith tradition. Today, practices and perspectives that arise from the heart of ourLatin@ reality are revitalizing this aspect of our Catholic faith. This ritualizing of andin daily life reconfigures public and domestic space, interrupts the rhythms of“business as usual,” and challenges participants and observers alike to contemplateanew the imperatives of justice and right relations called forth by the reign of God.• Dr. Carmen Nanko-Fernández is an assistant professor of Pastoral Ministry at the CatholicTheological Union in Chicago. She is the co-editor of New Theology Review and a pastPresident of the Academy of Catholic Hispanic Theologians of the United States(ACHTUS). Her areas of specialization are US Hispanic/Latino/a theologies, Catholicsocial teaching, interreligious, intercultural relations, youth, and the intersectionsof faith and popular culture.
  • 6. “The Parish as Hub of Faith: An Intercultural Toolboxfor Communion”What are we to do when parishes function more like cultural crossroadsthan village congregations? Recent data on the increasing size anddiversity of parishes makes this question ever more urgent. And lets face it, liturgical ministry canbe intimidating when the ekklesia turns out to be a gathering of distinct cultures, generations,social classes, and ecclesiologies. Fortunately, there are some tools in the intercultural toolbox—tools both sociological and theological—that help us recognize the power and range of culturaldifferences before we make unwise moral judgments about them. Some of these particularly helpleaders in multicultural parishes. They can help us listen for unexpected cultural differences,observe how power differences impact parish life, and learn how to invite those (especially in theyounger generations) who do not see the point of sacraments and liturgy. Rev. Dr. Brett C. Hoover, CSP, is a Paulist priest who teaches in the Theological Studies department atLoyola Marymount University in Los Angeles. He is the author of several journal and magazine articlesand three books, including the latest: Comfort: An Atlas of the Body and Soul and Losing Your Religion(Riverhead, 2011). In addition to teaching faith and culture classes at LMU, he directs COPIM, acultural orientation program for international priests. He completed his Ph.D. in 2010 at theGraduate Theological Union in Berkeley and has taught at the three Catholic theologicalgraduate schools there as well as at Loyola University in Chicago. Ordained in 1997, he hasworked in culturally diverse Catholic parishes in New York City, Northern and SouthernCalifornia, and in the Midwest.
  • 7. “Vatican II and the Liturgy:Looking to the Future with Hope”Archbishop Quinn will help us reflect on how Vatican II changedthe way we celebrate and understand the liturgy, see where weare today in light of that call, and give us some areas of hope where we can work forfurther implementation and continued development of the Council’s vision of full,conscious, and active participation in the liturgy and its role in Christian life. The retired archbishop of San Francisco, Most Reverend Quinn served as the president ofthe United States bishops conference from 1977 to 1980. In 1999, he published the bookThe Reform of the Papacy in response to Blessed Pope John Paul II’s encyclical Ut UnumSint calling for Christian unity.
  • 8. “With Liturgy and Justice for All: How the RomanMissal Teaches Us to Glorify the Lord by Our Lives”The Liturgy is indeed the "work of the people," but where is thiswork directed: to a more "perfect" ritual, or for something more?This workshop will help liturgists, preachers, and social action ministers enter into amore productive and collaborative relationship by addressing the missiologicalimplications of the Roman Missal, whose revised texts and options call us to preachmore clearly a Gospel of justice for those on the margins. Respecting the rubrics, thisworkshop will show how liturgists and preachers can help the faithful to experience theradical call of justice and how the liturgy itself can move the faithful to engage inradical justice themselves in their daily lives. Fr. Jon Pedigo, STL, is a native of the Bay Area and a priest of the Diocese of San Jose. Heholds a Bachelor’s of Music Degree from San Francisco State University, a Master ofMusic from Indiana University, and a Licentiate in Sacred Theology from theJesuit School of Theology in Berkeley. He serves as Pastor at Our Lady of Guadalupein San Jose.
  • 9. “From Multicultural to Intercultural Liturgy: A Reviewof the New Edition of the FDLC Guide”This workshop will look at the basic principles of worship in amulticultural assembly. The development of the new edition of theFDLC guide “Liturgy in a Culturally Diverse Community: A Guide TowardUnderstanding” will also be presented. What has been learned since the last publicationof this document in 2002 in helping to bring people of different cultures and languagestogether in the same liturgy? (This workshop is repeated in the afternoon.) Mark Francis has lived and ministered in both Latin America and Europe. After earninghis doctorate in liturgy at the Pontifical Liturgical Institute of Sant’ Anselmo in 1987, hetaught Liturgy at Catholic Theological Union at Chicago for 13 years. Among numerouspublications on the relationship between culture and liturgy, he authored MulticulturalCelebration: A Guide, commissioned by the Federation of Diocesan LiturgicalCommissions in 2002, and its re-edition in 2012 with Br. Rufino Zaragoza, OFM.Mark has just completed 12 years in Rome as Superior General of his religiouscommunity, the Viatorians, and is a visiting scholar at Santa Clara University.
  • 10. “When the Spirit Says Sing: Forming VibrantAssemblies and Music Ministers through the Spirit ofthe Psalms of the Black Catholic Church”Explore the unique characteristics and gifts that Black Catholicmusic and prayer offer to the Church and how these gifts can enhance your ownexperience of prayer and worship in a diverse community. Learn how to help musicministers deepen their own spirituality using their primary hymnal—the Psalms—sothat singing becomes more than just about learning notes but about giving praise toGod by our lives. Rawn Harbor serves as an adjunct faculty member and director of liturgy and music atthe Franciscan School of Theology in Berkeley and adjunct faculty and director of thegospel choir at the University of San Francisco. He studied at Furman University, HowardUniversity, the Catholic University of America, the Catholic Theological Union atGeorgetown University and the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley, wherehe earned his master’s in theological studies in 2001. Rawn is director of liturgyat St. Columba Catholic Church in Oakland, California.
  • 11. “The Community as Contemplative: Integratingmonasticism into new expressions of communityand worship”New communities are popping up all over the nation as people areseeking ways to integrate Church tradition into a new Church expression. The NewMonasticism Movement seeks to create an alternative way of living and beingcommunity amidst the loudness of a broken world. Learn how parishes can providesacred space and relationship to modern day contemplatives. Ms. Sideco is a native of San Francisco, born and raised in an immigrant Filipino family.She has studied and trained with the Jesuits and their lay colleagues at Santa ClaraUniversity and The Jesuit School of Theology. She was a Jesuit Volunteer in Atlanta,Georgia, before working at several Jesuit universities. In the wake of Hurricane Katrina,Ms. Sideco founded Contemplatives in Action, an urban retreat experience. She blogs forthe National Catholic Reporter Consultant for In Good Company. She is a spiritualdirector, retreat leader, liturgist, and chaplain.
  • 12. “Reconfiguring Parish: Reshaping Our Vision of Churchfrom a Building on a Corner to a People on a Mission”American Catholics are attached to their churches. One of the mosttroubling issues emerging from the attempts to restructure parishes in differentdioceses of the United States is the intense conflict that arises among people with thereconfiguring of local church. How can our Catholic sacramental imagination andpractices of pastoral care and reconciliation help us negotiate the difficult terrain ofparish closures and mergers to lead communities into a new image of the Body ofChrist? Michael Weldon, OFM, DMin, of Francis and Clare’s Friary, Franklin, Wisconsin, is also aninstructor at Sacred Heart School of Theology, Hales Corners, Wisconsin. He is the authorof A Struggle for Holy Ground: Reconciliation and the Rites of Parish Closure published byLiturgical Press.
  • 13. “Ecology and Liturgy: What the Earth Can Teach Usabout Diversity”Earth is a dynamic community of life that thrives on mutuality, connection, relationship.Its species make up an interconnected web that binds beings to each other in mutualinterdependence. Biodiversity is essential to earth’s thriving and to the well-being of ourhuman community. This workshop puts our conversation about interculturality intodialogue with understandings of the earth’s ecosystems and how they flourish. Itexplores what the earth can teach us about cultivating deeper communion acrossdifference and about nourishing mutually enhancing relationships within our localcommunities. Mary E. McGann, RSCJ, PhD, is assistant professor of liturgy and music at the FranciscanSchool of Theology at Berkeley. She is the author of Exploring Music as Worship andTheology and co-author with Edward Foley, Capuchin, of Music in the EucharisticPrayer published by Liturgical Press. Her book, A Precious Fountain: Music in theWorship of an African American Community, won first place in the Catholic PressAssociation book awards.
  • 14. “Deacons at the Liturgy: Theology and Praxis”While it is important to know what deacons are to do (and not do)in the liturgies of the Church, it is perhaps even more important toconsider why they are asked to do these things. This workshop is not a "how to" sessionas much as it is a "why to" conversation. It is designed to show how the deaconsliturgical ministries are "source and summit" of all aspects of ministry, and it is designedfor all who serve with deacons liturgically. Bill Ditewig served in the United States Navy for 22 years. In 1990, while still on activeduty, he was ordained a Catholic deacon for the Archdiocese of Washington, DC. From2002-2007 he was the Executive Director of the Secretariat for the Diaconate at theUnited States Conference of Catholic Bishops in Washington, DC. He is an adjunctprofessor at Santa Clara University in California. Bill has a BA in Philosophy, an MA inEducation, an MA in Pastoral Theology, and the PhD in Theology from the CatholicUniversity of America. He currently serves as the director of faith formation for theDiocese of Monterey.
  • 15. “Praise and Worship and Mass: Can They WorkTogether?”Can praise and worship music mix with Sunday liturgy without watering either down?In this workshop, a Catholic praise and worship leader and musician will help you assessand know how to incorporate the good things about this style of music and prayer whileavoiding some of the pitfalls that can make it more performance than prayer and moreindividualistic than communal. Learn how to make the liturgy more accessible to awider variety of ages and musical sensibilities. Jon Manongdo is a singer and songwriter whose purpose and vocation is to serve Godwith the talents afforded to him by the Father. Through music Jon captures the stories ofeveryday life, and couples it with the hopeful message of the Gospel. Jon serves as a musicminister at several parishes in the Diocese of San Jose and assists in music ministrythroughout the Bay Area.
  • 16. “Prays Well with Others: How Liturgical Leaders, Clergy, andCommunities of Different Cultures Can Become BetterPartners in the Parish’s Liturgical Life”Today, it’s not unusual for a pastor from one culture to be assigned to aparish of another culture, and more and more parish leaders find theyneed to minister to the liturgical needs of people who don’t speak theirlanguage. Explore real-life situations like these, discuss some best practices in theformation of U.S. clergy from other countries, and learn skills for liturgical coordinators,parish staffs, and clergy to overcome language barriers and cultural pre-conceptions tobuild stronger working relationships. Sharon McMillan, a Sister of Notre Dame de Namur, serves as liturgy director at San Carlos Cathedralin Monterey, California. She offers insights from previous formation experience at St. Patrick’sSeminary, Menlo Park, as well as current parish involvement. Lupita Vital Cruz is the Director of Hispanic Apostolate for the Diocese of San Jose. FromGuadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico, Lupita has served in San Jose for more than twenty years. Sheholds a degree in Biblical and Catechetical Studies from the Biblical School of Studies,Guadalajara, degrees in theology from Notre Dame University and the Jesuit School ofTheology at Berkeley, and a Masters in Catechesis from Santa Clara University.
  • 17. “From Eggs to Art: The Ukrainian Experience ofPysanky, Part 1”You dont have to be Ukrainian (or artistic) to appreciate the beauty of this richlysymbolic art of decorated Ukrainian eggs. Amy will guide you through the history of thisart in the Ukraine culture and take you step by step through the making of your ownunique egg to take home. This two-part workshop will give you a sound understandingof the art’s basic techniques and symbols and an experience of the deeper spirit of thisancient tradition of prayer and contemplation. Registration for both sessions B-6 and C-6 and a $5 materials fee (given directly to the presenter at the workshop) are required ifyou want to create your own egg. Observers are welcomed at either session at noadditional fee. Amy has served in several parishes in the Diocese of San Jose in catechetical ministry andcurrently serves as an administrative assistant at Saint Patrick Seminary in MenloPark. She has taught many classes on the art of Pysanky throughout the Bay Area.
  • 18. “And the Word Became Projected: Use of Mediain Worship”From projection systems to iPads, contemporary media is finding aplace in many worship spaces today. How do you measure and balance the value ofusing real books with the value of increased participation by the assembly? What arethe best practices for integrating equipment into an existing space and for discerningwhat should and shouldn’t be projected? How can multicultural communities use thesekinds of systems well for intercultural liturgy? The Diocese of San Jose Environment andArt Committee will share their insights and struggles with these questions from theirexperience of developing diocesan guidelines for media in worship. Fr. Christopher Bennett has served as a priest of the Diocese of San Jose since 1990. He isthe chair of the diocesan Environment and Art Committee and serves as Pastor at SantaTeresa Parish in San Jose.
  • 19. “From Multicultural to Intercultural Liturgy: A Reviewof the New Edition of the FDLC Guide”This workshop will look at the basic principles of worship in amulticultural assembly. The development of the new edition of theFDLC guide “Liturgy in a Culturally Diverse Community: A Guide TowardUnderstanding” will also be presented. What has been learned since the last publicationof this document in 2002 in helping to bring people of different cultures and languagestogether in the same liturgy? (This workshop is a repeat of the morning session.) Mark Francis has lived and ministered in both Latin America and Europe. After earninghis doctorate in liturgy at the Pontifical Liturgical Institute of Sant’ Anselmo in 1987, hetaught Liturgy at Catholic Theological Union at Chicago for 13 years. Among numerouspublications on the relationship between culture and liturgy, he authored MulticulturalCelebration: A Guide, commissioned by the Federation of Diocesan LiturgicalCommissions in 2002, and its re-edition in 2012 with Br. Rufino Zaragoza, OFM.Mark has just completed 12 years in Rome as Superior General of his religiouscommunity, the Viatorians, and is a visiting scholar at Santa Clara University.
  • 20. “Women Deacons: Past, Present, Future”The questions of whether or not women have served as deacons inthe past and whether they should do so again are quite distinct fromquestions related to women and the priesthood. Recent scholarship (Macy, Ditewig,Zagano) has explored this distinctiveness, and that research forms the basis of thisworkshop. Bill Ditewig served in the United States Navy for 22 years. In 1990, while still on activeduty, he was ordained a Catholic deacon for the Archdiocese of Washington, DC. From2002-2007 he was the Executive Director of the Secretariat for the Diaconate at theUnited States Conference of Catholic Bishops in Washington, DC. He is an adjunctprofessor at Santa Clara University in California. Bill has a BA in Philosophy, an MA inEducation, an MA in Pastoral Theology, and the PhD in Theology from the CatholicUniversity of America. He currently serves as the director of faith formation for theDiocese of Monterey. He is co-author with Gary Macy and Phyllis Zagano of WomenDeacons: Past, Present, Future.
  • 21. “Cross-Cultural Competence for Liturgical Musicians”The revised FDLC document “Liturgy in a Culturally DiverseCommunity: A Guide Toward Understanding” contains sectionentitled “Building Relationships Between Music Ministers” and“The Ever-Shifting Lens of Intercultural Music-making.” Those concepts will be exploredin depth, along with practical examples and best practices for musicians desiring togrow in cross-cultural competence. Repertoire suggestions for language combinations ofVietnamese, Filipino, Spanish, and English will also be reviewed. Nurtured in Franciscan spirituality, Rufino Zaragoza, explores the richness ofmulticultural communities, researches Asian liturgical inculturation, and lectures on thejoys and complexities of intercultural worship. He has promoted the development ofmultilingual song collections in English, Spanish, and Vietnamese and prepares worshipresources drawing from each of these cultural traditions. Rufino serves as a liturgicalmusic consultant, based in the Diocese of Orange, California. Rufino has been published in“Ministry and Liturgy,” “Liturgia y Canción,” “Today’s Liturgy,” “Rite,” and “PastoralMusic,” and most recently, he contributed to the revised document on multiculturalliturgies, published by FDLC.
  • 22. “Young Adult Catholics: What They Seek in the Liturgy,the Church, and their Daily Lives”Most young adults today tend to look beyond difference and enterinto a variety of diverse communities more easily than their grandparents or parentsdo. But for many of them, the parish community is still one that they find hard to breakinto. What gifts and prophetic challenges do young adults give to the Church that call usto look again at how we prepare liturgy that connects to their experience? Explore somecreative approaches to helping young adults meet their spiritual needs in the Churchtoday. Ms. Sideco is a native of San Francisco, born and raised in an immigrant Filipino family.She has studied and trained with the Jesuits and their lay colleagues at Santa ClaraUniversity and The Jesuit School of Theology. She was a Jesuit Volunteer in Atlanta,Georgia, before working at several Jesuit universities. In the wake of Hurricane Katrina,Ms. Sideco founded Contemplatives in Action, an urban retreat experience. Sheblogs for the National Catholic Reporter Consultant for In Good Company. She is aspiritual director, retreat leader, liturgist, and chaplain.
  • 23. “From Eggs to Art: The Ukrainian Experience ofPysanky, Part 2”You dont have to be Ukrainian (or artistic) to appreciate the beauty of this richlysymbolic art of decorated Ukrainian eggs. Amy will guide you through the history of thisart in the Ukraine culture and take you step by step through the making of your ownunique egg to take home. This two-part workshop will give you a sound understandingof the art’s basic techniques and symbols and an experience of the deeper spirit of thisancient tradition of prayer and contemplation. Registration for both sessions B-6 and C-6 and a $5 materials fee (given directly to the presenter at the workshop) are required ifyou want to create your own egg. Observers are welcomed at either session at noadditional fee. Amy has served in several parishes in the Diocese of San Jose in catechetical ministry andcurrently serves as an administrative assistant at Saint Patrick Seminary in MenloPark. She has taught many classes on the art of Pysanky throughout the Bay Area.
  • 24. OCTOBER 9 – 12, 2012SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA