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Welcome-slides-durham-tech

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Welcome slides for Access

Welcome slides for Access

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  • 1. Wednesday, January 28, 2015Instructor: Miss Lee Please login (See handout)
  • 2. • Durham resident • Teaching Microsoft Office for 20 years • Favorite applications – Excel and Access
  • 3. • What’s your name? • What do you do? • Have you used Access before? • What are your expectations for the class? • What is your favorite Microsoft application?
  • 4. 1. Created a relational database from scratch before 2. Need to create a database from scratch 3. Have used Access or another database before 4. Need to maintain an existing database 5. Need to import data from Excel or another format 6. Have specific questions about Access 7. None of the above Quick Survey
  • 5. • Comfortable using other Microsoft Applications • Familiar with Office 2010 Interface • Check cell phones • Does everyone have a book? • No Lewis and Clarking, please • Guided exploration • Ask lots of questions • Learn a lot • Have fun 
  • 6. 1: Exploring Access 2010 2: Building a database 3: Maintaining a database 4: Querying a database Today’s Lessons
  • 7. Lesson 1: Exploring Access 2010 p. 2
  • 8. 10 Lesson 1: Learning Objectives  After studying this lesson, you will be able to:  Define database and key terms associated with databases  Identify objects contained in modern databases and explain how they are used  Launch Access 2010 and identify elements of the application window  Create a new blank database and database table  Use the Navigation Pane and enter data into a table  Save and close database objects  Preview and print datasheets  Use Help  Close a database and exit Access 2010 p. 2
  • 9. Database Defined  What is a database?  A collection of related data stored together in one electronic file 11 p. 4
  • 10. Database Structures  Flat database files  Relational database files 12 Repetitive data p. 4
  • 11. Organizing Data into Tables  A typical clinic statement might include:  Distributed among these tables: 13 p. 5
  • 12. Exploring the Access Environment 14 Backstage view Templates Create a blank database p. 7
  • 13. Launching Access 2010  Same basic procedures used to launch other computer programs 15 p. 7
  • 14. DEVELOP YOUR SKILLS 16 p. 7 Launch Access 2010
  • 15. Creating a Blank Database  Name and save the database first 17 Filename for new database Browse to a folder p. 9
  • 16. DEVELOP YOUR SKILLS 18 p. 10 Create a Blank Database
  • 17. Features of the Database Window 19 Navigation Pane Ribbon tabs Shutter Bar Open/Close button Table1 p. 12
  • 18. Identifying Object Types  Four basic types of objects  Tables: Hold data  Queries: Search table data  Forms: Input table data  Reports: Report table data as meaningful information  Each object type is represented by a different icon  Tables:  Queries:  Forms:  Reports: 20 p. 13
  • 19. Using the Navigation Pane  Shutter button opens and closes the Navigation Pane  Organization appears in the Navigation Pane banner  Navigation Pane banner menu button ▼ displays the Navigation Pane menu  Choose a different organization from the Navigation Pane menu  Expand and collapse buttons to show/hide each object list 21 p. 12
  • 20. The Navigation Pane Menu 22 Menu button Ways to organize the Navigation Pane Active display features p. 12
  • 21. DEVELOP YOUR SKILLS 23 p. 14 Using the Navigation Pane
  • 22. Creating Tables in Datasheet View  Access creates the first table when you create a new blank database.  Table is generically named Table1  Additional tabs appear on Ribbon: 24 Table Tools: Fields & Table p. 15
  • 23. Three Basic Terms Used in Databases  Field  The basic unit of database tables  Holds one piece of data—first name, last name, street  Record  A collection of all fields related to one item  All fields for a person or company  File  A collection of all related records stored together  All customers or all suppliers 25 p. 15
  • 24. Navigating Datasheets  Tables and queries display in a row and column layout called a datasheet  Datasheet resembles an Excel spreadsheet  To move from column to column, press [Tab] or [Enter] or click the cell 26 Navigation buttons p. 16
  • 25. Table Guidelines  Each table has a primary key field  Primary key fields must contain data  Tables share at least one field with other tables in the database  Fields shared with other tables are foreign keys 28 p. 16
  • 26. What’s Wrong With This Table? Employee Name First Name Address Telephone Number Car Age John Smith John 393 Arundel Square Durham, NC 27703 919-688- 3748 Toyota 42 Susan Baker Susan 7 Dapping Drive Raleigh, NC 27614 919-847- 3284 Mazda 29 Todd Wilson Todd 103 Willow Way Cary, NC 27511 919-468- 1208 Chrysler 38 Redundant Data Not Smallest Logical Parts Unrelated Data Calculated Data T - Employees
  • 27. Pick A Primary Key First Name Last Name Address City State Zip Code DOB John Smith 393 Arundel Square Durham NC 27703 03/24/62 Susan Baker 7 Dapping Drive Raleigh NC 27614 12/10/75 Todd Wilson 103 Willow Way Cary NC 27511 6/13/66 Employee ID 001 002 003 Characteristics Of A Primary Key • Unique data • Cannot be blank • Typically an ID field • Can be more than one field AutoNumber??? T - Employees
  • 28. Data Types 31  Some are self-explanatory  Most common types:  Text  Number  Currency  Date & Time  Each data type has unique characteristics and limitations p. 17
  • 29. DEVELOP YOUR SKILLS 32 p. 18 Create and Save a Table Using a Datasheet
  • 30. Entering Data into a Table Datasheet Click the New Record button Press [Tab] or [Enter] to move to the next column The new row is identified with an asterisk 33 p. 21
  • 31. Previewing and Printing Data  Printing procedures unique to Access 34 p. 22
  • 32. Closing Databases & Exiting Access  Closing Databases  File > Close Database  [Ctrl]+[F4] closes open objects such as tables  Exiting Access  File > Exit  [Alt]+[F4]  Access 2010 application window Close button 35 p. 27
  • 33. Determine the Purpose of Your Database  Talk to people who will use the database.  Determine the information you would like the database to provide.  Identify the data inputs for your database.  Collect and analyze forms you currently use to record your data.  Examine a well-designed database similar to the one you are creating.  Determine the data outputs for your database.  Sketch out the reports you would like to produce with it. 36
  • 34. IN THIS LESSON WE COVERED 37  Define database and key terms associated with databases  Identify objects contained in modern databases and explain how they are used  Launch Access 2010 and identify elements of the application window  Create a new blank database and database table  Use the Navigation Pane and enter data into a table  Save and close database objects  Preview and print datasheets  Use Help  Close a database and exit Access 2010
  • 35. Lesson 2: Building a Database
  • 36. Lesson 2: Learning Objectives  After studying this lesson, you will be able to:  Identify key database design techniques  Open an existing database  Create a database table using Design view  Create a form  Create a report  Create a table from an Excel worksheet  Create a new database using a template 40 p. 32
  • 37. Planning a Database Design Asking questions helps identify objects  What info do you want to obtain from the database?  What pieces of data do you need for the info?  What groups do the fields fit into?  How do the groups interconnect?  What is the most efficient way to input data?  What questions will the data answer?  Reports  Fields  Tables  Foreign keys  Forms  Queries 41 p. 34
  • 38. Opening a Database  Same basic procedures used to open files in other computer programs  Enabling content to control security 42 p. 35
  • 39. DEVELOP YOUR SKILLS 43 p. 36 Open a Database, Enable Content, and Set Trusted Site
  • 40. Saving a Database as a New File  File > Save As command in Access is different from other applications 44 Save an existing object as a new object Save an existing database as a new database p. 38
  • 41. Opening Database Objects  Database objects are grouped by type on the Navigation Pane  Procedures for opening database objects similar to those used to open programs from the Desktop:  Double-click the object in the Navigation Pane  Right-click object in the Navigation Pane and choose Open  Drag the object name from the Navigation Pane to the work area of the Access window 45 p. 39
  • 42. DEVELOP YOUR SKILLS 46 p. 42 Navigate Records in a Table Datasheet
  • 43. Working with Tabbed Objects  Each open object in the database window is identified by a tab  To switch among open objects, click a tab 47
  • 44. Creating Database Objects  The Create tab of the Ribbon contains tools for creating all database objects  Tools on the Ribbon are grouped by object type  Each object type has several different formats to choose from 48 p. 43
  • 45. Creating a Simple Form – Input  Forms are used to input data into database tables  Forms obtain their field names and data from tables or queries  Simple forms contain all fields for the table or query on which they are based 49 p. 44
  • 46. Creating Simple Reports – Output  Processes data into meaningful information  Formats data for printing  Contains all fields from the associated table 50 p. 47
  • 47. DEVELOP YOUR SKILLS 51 p. 44 Create a Simple Form
  • 48. Creating a Table Using Design View 52 p. 53
  • 49. DEVELOP YOUR SKILLS 53 p. 53 Create a Database Table Using Design View
  • 50. Importing Data from Excel  Creates new tables from data stored in other programs  External Data tab on the Ribbon contains Import tools  Most import procedures use Wizards 54 p. 55
  • 51. DEVELOP YOUR SKILLS 55 p. 55 Import Excel Data
  • 52. Create a Database Using a Template  In Access, database templates are ready-to-use databases  Each template contains a set of objects designed for a specific purpose  Storing contacts, tracking projects, etc.  Each object in the database created with a template can be customized to meet specific needs 56 p. 57
  • 53. Finding and Selecting Templates 57 Sample templates Search for more templatesBusiness templates group downloaded from Microsoft p. 57
  • 54. DEVELOP YOUR SKILLS 58 p. 58 Create a Task Database
  • 55. Are There Any Questions? 59
  • 56. IN THIS LESSON WE COVERED 60  Identify key database design techniques  Open an existing database  Create a database table using Design view  Create a form  Create a report  Create a table from an Excel worksheet  Create a new database using a template
  • 57. Lesson 3: Maintaining a Database p. 70
  • 58. DEVELOP YOUR SKILLS 63 p. 58 Save a Database Object as New Object
  • 59. DEVELOP YOUR SKILLS 64 p. 62 Backup a Database
  • 60. Learning Objectives  After studying this lesson, you will be able to:  Change the layout of a table by adjusting column width, hiding columns, and rearranging column layout  Locate and update records by sorting, filtering, and using Find and Replace  Enhance a datasheet  Set table field properties  Rename, copy, and delete database objects 65 p. 70
  • 61. Formatting Datasheet Layout  Changing column width  Moving and hiding columns  Saving a datasheet layout 66 p. 72
  • 62. Changing Column Width  The mouse shape is important when selecting columns and borders  Drag a column border to make the column on the left of the border wider or narrower  Double-click a column heading border to change the width of the column on the left to fit the longest data entry in the column 67 Mouse shape on column border for sizing column Mouse shape on field name for selecting a column p. 72
  • 63. Moving and Hiding Columns  Hiding and moving fields in a datasheet has no impact on the actual structure of the table  Data remains available but is hidden from view when columns are hidden  Moving columns enables you to print datasheets in different arrangements 68 Black bar identifies location when dragging a field to move it Hide Fields command on context menu p. 72
  • 64. Saving Datasheet Layout  Each time you make a change to the layout of a table, you must save the table  The Save button appears on the Quick Access toolbar 69 p. 73
  • 65. DEVELOP YOUR SKILLS 70 p. 73 Format a Table Datasheet Layout
  • 66. Enhancing a Datasheet  Tools on the Home tab of the Ribbon  Gridline formatting tools  Font, font size, and font color  Table background color 71 p. 75
  • 67. DEVELOP YOUR SKILLS 72 p. 76 Enhance a Datasheet
  • 68. Modifying Table Structures  Adding fields to existing tables  Deleting fields from a table  Editing field data types 73 p. 78
  • 69. DEVELOP YOUR SKILLS 74 p. 79 Modify the Table Structure
  • 70. Setting Up Lookup Fields  Enables you to locate data contained in a table while entering data into another table.  Lookup Wizard is a Data Type  Advantages:  Reduces the time required to enter the data repeatedly  Reduces errors associated with data entry  Restricts data to valid entries 75 p. 81
  • 71. DEVELOP YOUR SKILLS 76 p. 83 Set a Lookup Field Using a Wizard
  • 72. Setting Field Properties  Control the characteristics of data entered into fields  Properties available differ depending on data type of a field  Provides automatic formatting for raw data  Example: Data entered: 3185554356 Property format applied: (318) 555-4356  Example: Data entered: la Property format applied: LA 77 p. 85
  • 73. Common Field Properties Used Field Property Description Field Size Sets a field length that controls the number of data characters each field can hold. Caption Sets a column heading title that describes the data content better than the actual field name. Input Mask Identifies the format of values entered—alphabetic or numeric, uppercase or lowercase, with hyphens or without, etc. Validation Rule Controls actual values entered into fields—less than 100, greater than 1000, like RCE Validation Text Provides a tip that identifies valid data entries. Default Value Adds a default value for a specific field in each record. 78 p. 85
  • 74. Setting Field Properties  Control the way data displays  Accounts for different format (all caps, lowercase, etc.) used by data entry clerks  Ensures consistent look in reports and other objects  Control values that can be entered  Provide tips for data entry  Set the number of characters that can be entered for a field  Set a default field value p. 86
  • 75. Setting Field Size  Limits the number of characters allowed for field values  Triggers a warning message that data may be lost  Example:  Setting the State field size to 2 to accommodate state abbreviations deletes all values containing more than 2 characters in the State field 80 p. 86
  • 76. Setting Captions  Changes the text that appears in datasheet column heading  Presents more descriptive field titles Fname  First Name 81 p. 86
  • 77. Setting Input Masks  Sets data format  Provides a consistent display of data for all records  Uses many symbols to control format  Access adds characters that control how data displays: 1234567890(123) 456-7890 howard SMITHHoward Smith 82 p. 86
  • 78. Using the Input Mask Build Button 83 p. 86
  • 79. DEVELOP YOUR SKILLS 84 p. 89 Set Primary Key, Field Size, Captions, and Input Mask Properties
  • 80. DEVELOP YOUR SKILLS 85 p. 93 Set Validation Rules
  • 81. DEVELOP YOUR SKILLS 86 p. 94 Set Default Values
  • 82. Retrieving Data  Three basic tools:  Sorting features  Filtering tools  Find and Replace feature 87 p. 95
  • 83. Sorting Records  Sort ascending  Alphabetical order from A to Z  Numeric order from lowest to highest  Chronological order from first to last  Sort descending  Reverse alphabetical order from Z to A  Numeric order from highest to lowest  Reverse chronological order from last to first 88 p. 96
  • 84. Sorting Records Using Multiple Fields  Access considers second fields when values in the first field are equal  Example: Personal names  When the last name is the same, you can tell Access to consider the first name  Last name is the primary sort field  First name is the secondary sort field 89 p. 97
  • 85. How Multiple Column Sorts Work  Access sorts data on multiple fields from left to right  Columns in a table must appear side by side in the datasheet  The column on the left must be the one you want sorted first (primary sort field) 90 p. 97
  • 86. DEVELOP YOUR SKILLS 91 p. 98 Sort Records Using Multiple Fields
  • 87. Creating Validation Rules  Limits values entered into a field  Reduces errors associated with data entry  Restricts data entry to valid values  Data type should be set for the type values entered  Text provides instructions for data entry  Appears in status bar when field is active  Appears in message box when invalid values are entered  Wide variety of comparison operators  Wildcards can be used 92 p. 92
  • 88. Setting Default Field Values  Adds a value to a field automatically  Can be edited to contain a different value 93 p. 94
  • 89. Using Find and Replace  Techniques similar to those in other applications  Use Find and Replace to locate records to remove or edit records 94 p. 99
  • 90. DEVELOP YOUR SKILLS 95 p. 101 Locate and Delete Records in a Table
  • 91. DEVELOP YOUR SKILLS 96 p. 102 Locate and Delete Records in a Form
  • 92. DEVELOP YOUR SKILLS 97 p. 103 Update Multiple Records Using Find and Replace
  • 93. Filtering Records  Filter by Selection  Selects records on the basis of the value contained in the active field for the active record  Filter by Form  Selects records on the basis of values or conditions (criteria) that you type in one or more form fields 98 Tip! Again, Access searches only the fields you specify to find the match. p. 103
  • 94. Using the Toggle Filter Tool  After you apply a filter, clicking the Toggle Filter button removes the filter and displays all records  After removing a filter, clicking the Toggle Filter button reapplies the last filter applied 99 Tip! A ToolTip displays to let you know what action you are performing: Remove Filter or Apply Filter. p. 104
  • 95. DEVELOP YOUR SKILLS 100 p. 105 Filtering Records by Selection
  • 96. Identifying Comparison Operators  Identifies the comparison Access should perform  Operators include:  =  >  <  <>  >=  <= 101 p. 105
  • 97. Using Wildcards  Used in place of specific characters  Primary wildcards used:  * Represents any number of characters  ? Represents an individual character  Examples:  *Graham* locates all records with graham within the text  Gra?am locates all records with gra at the beginning of the field value and am at the end of the field value with only one letter between 102 p. 106
  • 98. DEVELOP YOUR SKILLS 103 p. 107 Filter Records by Form
  • 99. Are There Any Questions? 104
  • 100. IN THIS LESSON WE COVERED 105  Change the layout of a table by adjusting column width, hiding columns, and rearranging column layout  Locate and update records by sorting, filtering, and using Find and Replace  Enhance a datasheet  Set table field properties  Rename, copy, and delete database objects
  • 101. Lesson 4: Querying a Database
  • 102. 108 Learning Objectives  After studying this lesson, you will be able to:  Create, save, and run select queries  Design a query using multiple tables  Set query criteria  Define a query sort order  Create and format a calculated field  Use functions in query expressions  Create a crosstab query  Create unmatched and duplicates queries p. 122
  • 103. Queries Defined  Queries are database objects that enable you to ask questions of a database in order to retrieve data and extract records that meet specific criteria 109 p. 124
  • 104. Reviewing Query Features  Query results datasheet data remains stored in its original table rather than in the query  Data edited in a query results datasheet changes data stored in a table  Queries are dynamic objects that display up-to-date data stored in database tables  Queries can be used to create forms and reports containing fields from multiple tables  Query results datasheets enable you to filter or organize data using the same techniques you use to filter and organize table datasheets 110 p. 124
  • 105. DEVELOP YOUR SKILLS 111 p. 125 Create a Select Query Using the Query Wizard
  • 106. Creating Select Queries  Access contains two distinct tools for creating select queries:  Query Wizard  Design View 112 p. 127
  • 107. Using the Simple Query Wizard  Steps you through the creation of a select query  Enables you to identify table(s) and fields from each table that you want to include in the query  Prompts you to save the query 113 p. 125
  • 108. Using Query Design View  Presents a split window with table field lists at the top and columns and rows at the bottom 114 p. 127
  • 109. Adding Fields to the Query Grid  Double-click a field name to add the field to the next available column of the query design grid  Drag a field to the next column in the grid  Click the Field row of a column in the query grid and selecting the field from the drop-down list  Double-click the asterisk (*) that appears at the top of the field list to add all fields to the grid  Double-click the field list title bar to place each field in the table in a separate column of the query grid. 115 Note! When you use the asterisk to add all fields, Access places the table name in field row, but when you run the query, each field appears in a separate column of the query results datasheet. p. 128
  • 110. DEVELOP YOUR SKILLS 116 p. 129 Create a Query Using Query Design
  • 111. DEVELOP YOUR SKILLS 117 p. 133 Create a Multi-Table Query
  • 112. Setting Query Criteria 118 Comparison Operator Wildcard Value Dates Wildcard p. 135
  • 113. DEVELOP YOUR SKILLS 119 p. 135 Add Criteria and Run a Query
  • 114. Setting AND and OR Criteria  AND Criteria  OR Criteria 120 p. 137
  • 115. DEVELOP YOUR SKILLS 121 p. 138 Use Wildcards and Multiple Criteria in Queries
  • 116. DEVELOP YOUR SKILLS 122 p. 140 Use Date Criteria in Queries
  • 117. Sorting a Query and Limiting Results  Sorting Query Results  Using sort tools after running the query  Setting a sort order in the query grid Sort row 123 p. 141
  • 118. Limiting Results  Effective way of limiting results combines sorting with restricting the number of results to display  The Return feature on Query Design tab enables you to set the number of records you want to retrieve 124 p. 141
  • 119. Please Excuse My Dear Aunt Sally  Parentheses  Exponentials  Multiplication/Division  Addition/Subtraction (2+2)*32=6/2=33 125 p. 144
  • 120. Calculated Fields  Have no value of their own  Perform calculations using other field values Calculated field name Field names from existing tables Arithmetic or comparison operator 126 p. 144
  • 121. DEVELOP YOUR SKILLS 127 p. 146 Create and Format a Calculated Field
  • 122. Using Functions in Queries  Groups query results by field on which a sum or average or other order is required  Multiple fields and calculated fields can be used for grouping  Example shows minimum, maximum, and average 128 p. 146
  • 123. DEVELOP YOUR SKILLS 129 p. 148 Use Functions in Queries
  • 124. Crosstab Queries  Rearranges data for summarizing  Groups data and totals values 130 p. 151
  • 125. Crosstab Query Palette  Groupings appear as row and column headings  Summarized values appear in the TOTAL area 131 p. 151
  • 126. DEVELOP YOUR SKILLS 132 p. 152 Create a Crosstab Query
  • 127. Unmatched and Duplicates Queries  Checks database tables to ensure there is no duplication of records  Also checks database to ensure that records referenced in one table have a matching record in the other table  Hoped-for result of running these two queries is that Access finds nothing to report 133 p. 154
  • 128. DEVELOP YOUR SKILLS 134 p. 155 Create Unmatched and Duplicate Queries
  • 129. Structured Query Language  The underlying structure created for queries in Access 135 p. 156
  • 130. Are There Any Questions? 136
  • 131. IN THIS LESSON WE COVERED 137  Create, save, and run select queries  Design a query using multiple tables  Set query criteria  Define a query sort order  Create and format a calculated field  Use functions in query expressions  Create a crosstab query  Create unmatched and duplicates queries
  • 132. ? ? Relationship Types One-To-One One-To-Many Many-To-Many 1 1 ∞1 Employees Training Employees Parking Employees Salaries ∞∞ How Are These Table Related? Employees Training Parking Salaries ? ? ? ? Up to 3 hangtagsCourses are graded
  • 133. One-to-one Relationships 1. Simplest kind of relationship 2. Least common relationship 3. Link each record in one table to a single record in another table 4. Tables linked by primary keys 5. Tables with large number of fields 6. For security purposes Employees Employee ID First Name Last Name Address Telephone Salaries Employee ID Salary 1 1 Primary Key Primary Key Salary Tax Rate Exemptions …
  • 134. Parking ParkingID EmployeeID LicenseNumber Make Model Employees EmployeeID FirstName LastName Address Telephone One-To-Many Relationships 1. Most common relationship 2. Link each record in one table to several records in another table 3. Only one of the fields being linked can be primary key 4. Primary key must be in the table that contains one record for many records in other table 1 ∞ Not part of the One-To-Many relationship Foreign Key Primary Key (3 hangtags)
  • 135. Grade? Many-To-Many Relationships 1. Requires a Junction Table 2. Two One-To-Many Relationships ∞ ∞1 1 ∞ ∞ T – Employees T – Training ∞ ∞ T - Employees EmployeeID FirstName LastName Address Telephone T - Training ClassID ClassName ClassDescription Instructor Grade …Primary Key Primary Key TJ – Employees and Training EmployeeID ClassID Junction Table Training says, “I was wondering… where are we going to put the GRADE field?” Grade? Hmmmm… TJ – Employees and Training Students would get 1 grade for all their classes Everybody in class would get the same grade Where are we putting the GRADE field? Bob Bob Bob Sue Sue Sue Joe Joe Joe Excel Word Visio Excel Word Visio Excel Word Visio
  • 136. Are There Any Questions? 142

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