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011 - That’s the way to do it? Results launch from two pan-European studies: "Transport Carbon IntenCities" (TraCit) and "Strategies for Innovative Low Carbon Settlements" (SILCS).
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011 - That’s the way to do it? Results launch from two pan-European studies: "Transport Carbon IntenCities" (TraCit) and "Strategies for Innovative Low Carbon Settlements" (SILCS).

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Presentation given by Catherine Teeling and Lee Woods (Portsmouth School of Architecture, School of Civil Engineering and Surveying, University of Portsmouth) at UPEN workshop - Climate change and the …

Presentation given by Catherine Teeling and Lee Woods (Portsmouth School of Architecture, School of Civil Engineering and Surveying, University of Portsmouth) at UPEN workshop - Climate change and the Solent: Opportunities and Vulnerabilities

Published in Technology
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Transcript

  • 1.  
  • 2. Interreg IVC Low Carbon Economies Energy Efficiency Renewable Energies Eco-innovation and Environmental Technologies Sustainable Transport Behaviour Change
  • 3. TraCit Transport Carbon IntenCities Sustainable Transport SILCS Strategies for Innovative Low Carbon Settlements Eco-innovation and Environmental Technologies
  • 4. TraCit Transport Carbon IntenCities Sustainable Transport € 322,100.00 - € 261,975.00 Strategies for Innovative Low Carbon Settlements Eco-innovation and Environmental Technologies € 302,752.00 - € 227,064.00
  • 5. Strategies for Innovative Low Carbon Settlements Transport Carbon IntenCities
  • 6.  
  • 7.  
  • 8.
    • TraCit Partners
        • CURe – University of Portsmouth – SE UK (SEEDA)
        • Cracow University of Technology – Malapolska - Poland
        • Viimsi Municipality, Viimsi Parish - Estonia
        • SEIT Stockholm Environment Institute Tallinn – Estonia
  • 9. TraCit Aim Identify - Schemes and policies with the potential to reduce carbon intensive travel Support - development, economic growth and sustainability of new and existing urban environments Integrated approach to sustainable mobility and urban and regional development to determine improved implementation of Low Carbon Transport strategies to the benefit of both.
  • 10. TraCit How Method - Common approach to measuring travel intensity and carbon audits with respect to CO 2 emissions – all scales Pilots - installation design, development & implementation Advice - web environment project updates of key Guide material outputs good practice guidance
  • 11. TraCit Pilot Studies CURe, University of Portsmouth 1. Big Green Commuter Challenge (BGCC) 2. Land Use Transport Interaction (LUTI) Modelling 3. Design Charrette Krakow University of Technology (CUT) 4. Promotional Tram event 5. Promotional 'Bike Happening' event 6. Transport policy measures 7. Simulation Modelling Viismi Municipality 8. Various alternatives of public transport 9. Coastline development incorporating leisure facilities 10. Viimsi Bike event Stockholm Environmental Institute, Tallinn (SEIT) 11. Interactive internet cartoon 12. Estonian transport carbon audit and policy pathway
  • 12. TraCit Results Impact Location Transport policy measures (Pilot study 6) (VISUM) Krakow, Poland Overall, a 20% reduction over a 10 year period (2007-15) 580,000 veh-km during afternoon rush hour. 116 kg of CO 2 per capita per year. Simulation modelling of different land use schemes (Pilot study 7) (VISUM) Krakow, Poland Veh-km CO 2 (T) Land use development plan 4,192,000 386 Transportation corridors 4,006,000 369 188 kg of CO 2 per capita per year. Various transport and land use interventions (Pilot study 2) South Hants, UK Model used as best practise exemplar to inform partners’ models. Various alternatives of public transport (Pilot study 8) Viimsi, Estonia 72.4 CO 2 (kg) per capita per year
  • 13. TraCit Results Bike event Krakow Bike event Viimsi Tram event Krakow BGCC Cartoon Number aware (or participations) of the event 500 315 1,300 - 100,000 estimated hits Survey sample 419 112 120 1,089 - Cost (€) 5,500 15,282 2,000 3,338 1,296 (1st cartoon only) Date of event 25/5/2011 4/6/2011 10/12/2011 17/5/2011 -23/5/2011 18/5/2011 launched Reduction in CO 2 (kg per capita per day) 0.25 0.03 (from literature) 1.75 0.74 0.01 (from literature)
  • 14.
    • Project Partners
    • SE UK - Seeda
          • CURe University of Portsmouth (Lead Partner)
    • Noord Brabant
          • Province Noord Brabant , Holland
    • SE UK - Seeda
          • KCC Kent County Council
    • Andalucia
          • EPSA Empresa Publica de Suelo de Andalucia
          • (The Public Enterprise for Social Housing in Andalucia )Spain
  • 15. Aim Identify and demonstrate effectiveness of low carbon building initiatives within the framework of sustainable developments Objective To e xplore and evaluate solutions and low carbon strategies reducing carbon emissions for Sustainable Developments, whilst supporting economic growth and sustainable communities.
  • 16. Themes: Participation – Involvement of all stakeholders (consultation & engagement practice) Finance – Approach on financial models and life cycle costs Organisation – Optimal building design process & delivery – construction & implementation Technology – Most effective systems for low carbon solutions
  • 17.
    • Project Outcomes
    • • Regional workshops
    • • Case studies – evaluation & appraisal
    • • Site Visits to regional sustainable developments
    • Themed reports (Participation, Finance, Organisation, Technologies)
    • • Final comprehensive project report (Correlation across all themes)
    • • Final Dissemination Events
    • Transferable practice – regional policies and strategies
  • 18. SILCS
  • 19. SILCS Case Studies UK Graylingwell Chichester, Carbon Neutral Neighbourhood, the largest carbon neutral development in the United Kingdom JTP   Sustainable Cities of the Future – Eco Towns – ME Martin Centre     Chale – Community Retrofit; Isle of Wight - Southern Housing Group, Isle of Wight:   Sustainable Neighbourhoods Pan Urban Extension – Isle of Wight City Council:   ecoisland – the hub of a sustainable future; Eco-Island partnership CIC, Isle of Wight:
  • 20. SILCS Case Studies UK Testing the Future : SMART URBAN-ISM Urban Initiatives Borough Grove - Retrofit housing solutions, Petersfield – Interreg GESB Rackheath eco-community. Norfolk Live Design Charrette: Working with the community of Portsea to define their own sustainable strategies
  • 21. SILCS Case Studies Netherlands Innovative-green.Geerpark. Waterslingers. - Opportunity Cards – Dak Lab “ Brabantwoning” in Almkerk. Andalusia. Spain. Rehabilitación de la Barriada San Martín de Porres. Córdoba. MONITORING OF SOCIAL HOUSING. R&D PROJECT: EFFICACIA. SOCIAL HOUSING IN SEVILLE ( POLÍGONO AEROPUERTO-SEVILLE) Social housing in Umbrete, Seville.
  • 22. SILCS Results
  • 23. SILCS Results Numerous barriers continue to impede the improvement of energy efficiency in homes. The energy efficiency market is still characterised by information failure, numerous convoluted incentives in the energy chain, high subsidies, and disparate processes of measurement and verification and fragmented organisational structures.   The need for strong leadership and greater co-ordination in delivering and sustaining low carbon development projects is paramount. This includes leadership from local authorities with clear and consistent vision, encouraging and enabling partnerships with the private sector and community, through a simplified regulatory approach. Far greater collaboration is needed through long term proactive partnerships between all stakeholders. The challenges we face need us to work holistically and at scale, to develop the evidence for what works to encourage and de-risk investment.   The availability of finance to meet the carbon reductions targets is probably the biggest challenge to overcome. Retrofitting existing buildings, particularly public sector housing, is the largest part of the problem for the built environment.
  • 24. SILCS Results Good architecture should always have due regard to the prevailing climate. Passive design principles should always be utilised as a base standard to reduce the reliance on energy consuming technologies. The requirement to innovate : not just technological innovations but systems innovation and smarter ways of using technology. We need new models of delivery through community engagement; and new models of social enterprise which give the community a sense of ownership and encourage social cohesion.   It is essential to, work with, and engage communities over the whole project life – to understand the “Characteristics of place” - sharing the issues, the aspirations and evolving solutions collectively an collaboratively ensuring the community benefits from the legacy of infrastructure investments such as retrofit and renewables through stimulating local low carbon supply chains.  
  • 25. SILCS Results   The availability of finance to meet the carbon reductions targets is probably the biggest challenge to overcome. Retrofitting existing buildings, particularly public sector housing, is the largest part of the problem for the built environment. Particularly as life cycle costing techniques are not systematically employed in making long term economic decisions. Contrary to expectations, this reports findings emphasise that increased capital availability is not necessarily the most important tool in overcoming energy efficiency’s financial barrier. Instead, the solution lies in carefully designed policy packages, and strong political will, open and accessible advocacy and transparent accessible organizational processes. Policy makers should focus on reducing obstacles to the involvement of private and public stakeholders.
  • 26. Policies & Recommendations Brussels 21 st September 2011
  • 27. www.TraCit.port.ac.uk www.TraCit.org.uk Lee Woods: [email_address] www.SILCS.port.ac.uk www.SILCS.net.uk Catherine Teeling: [email_address] www.CURe.port.ac.uk Catherine Teeling: [email_address]