R & D for the High School Classroom: Day 1 (WIP-5 grant workshop)

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This presentation shares an overview of the the purpose of the R&D workshop, an introduction to inquiry, an introduction to the STEM Student Research Handbook, and two activities that can be used with students to demonstrate the research method by example (rather than lecture).

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  • So you have a feel for the topic this evening, here is an outline of what I’ll be talking about. While the topic is specifically implementing student research, I think you’ll find sound teaching philosophy that will help you in just about everything you do as a teacher.
  • So you have a feel for the topic this evening, here is an outline of what I’ll be talking about. While the topic is specifically implementing student research, I think you’ll find sound teaching philosophy that will help you in just about everything you do as a teacher.
  • Grant Requirements: Improve teacher content knowledge and student achievement; provide resources online for other teachers to access.Curriculum Proposal: You will design a curriculum plan for implementing student research in what ever context you find yourself.Lesson Design: Design a full-scale lesson (from the ground up) to support student researchers.IRP: Parklands, experiencing a bit of the scientific process.
  • Ok. At this point I’m going to assume you’re at least willing to entertain the idea that students should be allowed to do scientific inquiry at the highest levels. So let’s move onto the practical aspect of how you might implement student research. The first is to address the scientific method.
  • There are many ways to describe the spectrum of inquiry levels. One way is to determine the level of inquiry is: WHO poses the question, who plans the procedure, and who formulates the results? My goal in showing you this table is to help you think about curriculum planning. First of all, Look at the Non-inquiry column. Be critical of what labs you have students do. Students don’t come to you with the skills to perform a student-initiated project, you must model them, and teach them periodically throughout the school year.
  • We have an assumption that High-need Districts also have high #’s of low achievers. And the next assumption is that low achievers lack motivation. But I’d like to caution you, that high achievers also have motivational issues. I actually prefer lack of motivation, because I can light a fire under those kids! What really surprises me, is the misplaced over-eager grade-seeking motivation by the high achievers. To me, this type of motivation is just as problematic our society as The good news is inquiry works for ALL motivational issues!
  • Ok. At this point I’m going to assume you’re at least willing to entertain the idea that students should be allowed to do scientific inquiry at the highest levels. So let’s move onto the practical aspect of how you might implement student research. The first is to address the scientific method.
  • Was asked “How do we get more kids to go into STEM careers?” Let kids break stuff. Dr. Tyson says that kids are natural born scientists…its adults who get in the way! Let them play, let them discover. He sees adults as the problem, not kids. While the video is talking about parents, I believe it is true for science teachers as well.
  • In this photo, my son and I were out on a nature walk. He’s naturally inquisitive, asking great questions. Why is that fallen log all crumbly? Why don’t we see owls flying during the day? And these are great opportunities for us to talk. But as soon as I brought out the lab notebook, he didn’t see it as fun any more. There’s an important balance we must address regarding our attitude toward lab sciences. One one hand, we can do what Dr. Jeff Goldstien recommends, and poke stuff, and see what happens. But we also must be providing an environment in which students are improving their scientific thinking and practice skills.
  • The beginning of the school year, “Poke it, and see what happens” should outweigh our worries of whether students have sound scientific thinking and practice. If we try and make sure they REALLY understand “constants” they’ll never actually get to do science! We are often our worst enemy here! Our motives are good, but we execute poorly! We need to encourage students to find ways to test their ideas….and allow them to hone their skills and thinking throughout the year.
  • By the end of the year, we should have moved students closer to the right side of that inquiry table, where they are asking questions, developing sound research designs, analyzing their own data, and are their own worst critic when it comes to finding limitations in their own research.
  • Remember this chart? Even with all the tweaking of existing labs, leveling how/when we provide structure for students, providing inquisitive environments…all of this gets us to the second highest level, titled, teacher Initiated. And while this is a wonderful accomplishment, one most teacher never achieve, it still isn’t the highest level of inquiry. The Highest Level is Student-Initiated. This is the level where the student comes up with the topic and the question. But, because most courses have certain content that is “covered,” it just isn’t feasible to allow students to study what ever whim they have. Or is it?
  • Before we begin the dirty work in figuring out how to implement student research into our coursework, I want you to consider the following expert from the movie, “Meet the Robinsons.” In the first scene, Lewis’ enthusiasm for science and inventing is met with an unwelcome result. The second scene shows how in the right environment, kids can blossom and be free to make mistakes.
  • Ask audience for any comments regarding the video, then share these.
  • The STEM Student Research Handbook is written directly to the student.Although there is no teacher edition of this text, everything you need to facilitate research with students is found in this book. I have included what I call “teacher cues” throughout the text. These are phrases like, “Your teacher will either ask you to do this, or that.” That way you can take this as your cue to have this discussion with your students. After each chapter there are questions that align with the chapter objectives. You could use these as homework questions or as discussion starters. The Chapter Applications help students take what they just read and apply it to their own research topic. It reminds them what they should be working on. Sample rubrics are included for a research paper, oral presentations, and posters.
  • ….I mean science research, not educational research.
  • Let’s play word association…when I say “science fair” what comes to mind? I’m here today to talk to you about implementing longer-term student research projects. Although “science fair” is sort of what I’m talking about, I’ll spend my time talking about how to organize students to do their own research. While some of you may have a positive association with science fair, others of you may have been turned off with some aspect of a science fair experience you had in school. I’m asking that you listen with an open mind tonight, and think about the best way to allow your students to experience science as a real scientist does.
  • Ok. At this point I’m going to assume you’re at least willing to entertain the idea that students should be allowed to do scientific inquiry at the highest levels. So let’s move onto the practical aspect of how you might implement student research. The first is to address the scientific method.
  • If your first inclination is to teach the scientific method by using a graphic such as this…I am going to ask you to refrain. Provide students with activities that help them see these phases in action. Students don’t need yet another lecture about the scientific method. They need a way to make it real! DO something!
  • It’s your turn.
  • Possible ideas to test: flight time, distance, height, aerodynamics, or loops.
  • Depending on your purposes, you can level this activity to meet your students where they are. In the beginning, you may want students to PLAY, first, and lead them to a conceptual understanding of the scientific design terms, and introduce them after the lab. Could we choose to measure success of the same thing, in more than one way? Qualitative and Quantitative.
  • I have found that this is the best way to get kids to understand extraneous variables. Its all that stuff that would make the test “not fair.”
  • Constants are how we address those “cheaters” or extraneous variables. In scientific terms it what we need to pay attention in order to know whether our IV is what is made the change to the DV.
  • I like to use this lab to introduce mean/median/mode and range, which is descriptive statistical data. Range in particular, leads into great discussion about the reliability of the data set. If a group of trial has a large range, You can find myversion of this lab on my blog, and a free download
  • This chapter excerpt has three handouts that walks students through the thinking very meticulously. Using this much guidance may be ok for some students, but I find that the more “stuff” they have to write down, the less fun it becomes. And worse the less conceptual understanding students have.
  • Here is another activity that will show you how you not TEACH the scientific process, but allow students to experience it. Again, depending on your goals, you may want to encourage students to track their progress, writing down observations, predictions, and questions. Maybe even mention a “data table.” This is another activity that allows for some RICH discussion afterward.
  • Depending on whether you want students to work together or compete against one another, you may want to use that community chart I showed you yesterday. If you want to encourage collaboration, I would set up a scenario where the students in your class are competing against another class. This way have students working in pairs, but also sharing what they’ve learned with other in the class.
  • ….I mean science research, not educational research.
  • ….I mean science research, not educational research.
  • R & D for the High School Classroom: Day 1 (WIP-5 grant workshop)

    1. 1. Implementing Research and Development into the High School Classroom Welcome… As you come in, use the cardstock to make a name plate Your name and school July 8, 2013 Illinois State University WIP-5 Grant
    2. 2. Implementing Research and Development into the High School Classroom Dr. Darci J. Harland djharland@ilstu.edu Twitter: djSTEMmom (#HSresearch) www.STEMmom.org July 8, 2013 Illinois State University WIP-5 Grant
    3. 3. Today  Introduction to each other & the workshop  Allison Hennings (Oak Park River Forest)  DTAM Assessment  Allison Hennings  Intro to the STEM Student Research Handbook  AlkaSeltzer Rocket Challenge
    4. 4. Find Someone Who…
    5. 5. R&D Workshop Overview
    6. 6. The Big Picture Grant Requirements Lesson Design Independent Research Project Curriculum Proposal NGSS
    7. 7. To meet these Goals… Pedagogy of Inquiry Teaching Resources and time to develop lessons and units Expert Teachers Professional Expertise
    8. 8. Your Commitment 80 hours of face time during workshop Efast formative assessment training 4 Follow-up days this school year To implement lessons developed in workshop Various Assessment and other state requriements Summer 2014 2-week workshop
    9. 9. Importance of Inquiry
    10. 10. What are the Qualities of Inquiry?
    11. 11. Non- Inquiry Demo- nstration Activity Teacher- Initiated Student- Initiated Posing the Question None Teacher Teacher Teacher Student Planning the Procedure Teacher Teacher Teacher Student Student Formulating the Results Teacher Teacher Student Student Student Modified from: D. Llewellyn. 2002. Inquiry within: Implementing inquiry-based science standards. Thousand Oaks, Corwin Press. An interview I did for NSTA regarding Inquiry. Levels of Inquiry
    12. 12. Student Motivation High Achievers  Low Achievers  Lack motivation Misplaced motivation
    13. 13. Balancing Inquiry
    14. 14. A message from a physicist to parents - Neil DeGrasse Tyson
    15. 15. We’ve Got to Be That Light – A Gift to America’s Teachers: Dr. Jeff Goldstein (astrophysicist) Harland, D.J. (April 2, 2012) “Astrophysicist Challenges Science Education.” www.STEMmom.org
    16. 16. Poke It & See What Happens Sound Scientific Thinking and Practice Balance
    17. 17. Beginning of the Year
    18. 18. End of Year
    19. 19. What’s our Goal…really? Raise up the next generation of STEM professionals. To help students become scientifically literate To be sure that students know how to define good questions, and how to go about finding answers to those worthy questions.
    20. 20. Non- Inquiry Demo- nstration Activity Teacher- Initiated Student- Initiated Posing the Question None Teacher Teacher Teacher Student Planning the Procedure Teacher Teacher Teacher Student Student Formulating the Results Teacher Teacher Student Student Student Modified from: D. Llewellyn. 2002. Inquiry within: Implementing inquiry-based science standards. Thousand Oaks, Corwin Press. Levels of Inquiry
    21. 21. How Science Should Be “Meet the Robinsons”
    22. 22. Take Away? Our responses to kids, matter. Mistakes are crucial to learning Is my classroom a safe place to fail? Am I more concerned about students getting the “right” answer or in how they think?
    23. 23. STEM Research
    24. 24. Written directly to the student Geared to high school & undergraduate students “Teacher Cues” Chapter Questions & Chapter Applications Sample rubrics About The Handbook Harland, Darci J. (2011). STEM Student Research Handbook. Arlington: NSTA Press.
    25. 25. Poll What is your experience in doing research? A. I did a science project in grade school B. I did a science project in middle school C. I did research in high school D. I did research in college E. I’ve done several projects through the years F. I’ve never done a science project
    26. 26. Word Association I say “Science Fair”… You say?
    27. 27. Composition Design Challenge Notebook Pen Twine Tape
    28. 28. Learning the Scientific Method as a Process
    29. 29. Harland, D.J. (April 30, 2012) “Airplane Lab to Teach Scientific Method.” STEMmom.org.
    30. 30. Paper Airplane Activity Make 2 identical paper airplanes What do we want to test? How will we measure success? Modify ONE of your planes in ONE way.
    31. 31. Let’s Fly Our Planes
    32. 32. Paper Airplane Discussion How did we decide to measure success? Were there other ways we could have measured the same thing? Dependent Variable
    33. 33. Paper Airplane Discussion In what ways could a person cheat to win? Extraneous Variables
    34. 34. Paper Airplane Discussion Did our measurement accurately determine a winner? What rules could we add, to make the trials more fair? Constants
    35. 35. Harland, D.J. (April 30, 2012) “Airplane Lab to Teach Scientific Method.” STEMmom.org.
    36. 36. Things That Vary Gregory, Jess L. (2012). Paper Airplanes, Flying Through Variables In B. P. Skott & M. Ward (Eds.), Active Learning Exercises for Research Methods in Social Sciences (pp. 30-36): SAGE Publications, Inc.
    37. 37. Failure is Totally An Option! Collaboration Must be Modeled & Taught Two Key Ideas
    38. 38. Alka-Seltzer Rocket Activity Use any of the available materials to design a rocket that will propel the greatest monetary value to an elevation of at least 1 meter above its start location.
    39. 39. Community board Building Community (vs. competition)
    40. 40. How might you have students use the table on pages 6-8? Chapter 1 Getting research topics is often difficult for students. What can you do to aide students in coming up with good research ideas? What are the most common ethical issues (pg. 9-11) your students may encounter? How will you ensure they understand the importance of ethical and safety issues? Announcements
    41. 41. E-Journal Our Wiki What needs to happen in this workshop, if you are to believe it was worth your (summer) time and energy? http://RandDforHS.wikispaces.com
    42. 42. Tomorrow Fieldtrip to Parklands Read Articles in Binder Dress Appropriately Bring pencil & composition notebook

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