Literate environment presentation
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Literate environment presentation

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A literate environment was created for three students. This presentation analyzes this process.

A literate environment was created for three students. This presentation analyzes this process.

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  • This framework illustrates each perspective and the implications on learners, text, and instructional practices.

Literate environment presentation Literate environment presentation Presentation Transcript

  • THE KEYS TO CREATING A LITERATE ENVIRONMENT DANIELLE EVANS EDUC 6706: THE BEGINNING READER, PREK–3 WALDEN UNIVERSITY AUGUST 2013
  • THIS PRESENTATION WILL…… • Discuss the importance of a balanced literacy approach. • Identify and evaluate the use of cognitive and non-cognitive assessments used to get to know literacy learners. • Examine the implications of authentic literature selections. • Define instruction based on three instructional approaches: interactive, critical, and response instructional perspectives.
  • A BALANCED APPROACH TO LITERACY Expectations for 21st century students have shifted tremendously over the years. Elementary teachers across America are now preparing their students for the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers assessment (PARCC) assessment. The vision of this assessment is to support teachers in preparing students for college and careers by examining student learning gaps through a variety of modalities and critical thinking applications (Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers, 2013). As an educator, I must be able to effectively assess student literacy and provide supports that will meet the demands of the future. Three students were chosen for a non-cognitive and cognitive assessment process. Best teaching practices were researched, applied, and analyzed in order to create a literate environment for these students.
  • KEYS TO SUCCESS • Getting to know literacy learners • Selecting Text • Instruction- Interactive Perspective, Critical Perspective, Response Perspective
  • GETTING TO KNOW LITERACY LEARNERS
  • The goal of literacy instruction is to ensure that all students achieve their full literacy potential. Gail Tompkins- Literacy for the 21st Century, 2010
  • IMPLEMENTATION Teachers must channel assessment activities that provide non-cognitive and cognitive data regarding the student and support activities that will tailor to their individual needs and quality literacy instruction should have a balance of teacher-centered and student-centered activities (Tompkins, 2010). Dibels Next and Reading 3D assess student’s cognitive abilities across the five pillars of literacy in a systematic, individualized, and engaging fashion in order to develop appropriate student centered activities. Reading inventories are fundamental approaches to assessing student’s frustration, instructional, and independent reading levels (Afflerbach, 2012). Moreover, reading inventories also assess student attitude. To assess the non-cognitive abilities of students such as their attitude, motivation, interests, or creativity, the Elementary Reading Attitude Survey (ERAS) was administered. McKenna and Keer (1990) suggest that this survey appeals to students because of its pictorial aspect and it also provides teachers with beneficial information regarding student attitudes towards reading.
  • STUDENT PROFILES Student A- 7 years old, female, low-income family, enjoys playing with friends, low interest in recreational and academic reading, basic abilities in phonics, fluency, vocabulary, word identification, and comprehension low exposure to text at home, reading level B. Student B- 7 years old, male, low-income family, low interest in recreational and academic reading, basic abilities in phonics, fluency, vocabulary, word identification, and comprehension low exposure to text at home, enjoys sports and animals, reading level B. Student C- 7 years old, female, low-income family, high interest in recreational and academic reading, frequently visits library, proficient across all five pillars, high exposure to text at home, reading level J. Data gathered from ERAS, Dibels Next, and parent feedback.
  • 1. Administer pre- assessments, both cognitive and non- cognitive. 2. Analyze data to determine needs of learners before organizing instruction. KEY STEPS TO GET TO KNOW LITERACY LEARNERS
  • SELECTING TEXT
  • HOW?The Literacy Matrix There are multiple dimensions to consider when analyzing text. Text fits along a continuum ranging from narrative to informational continuum, linguistic to semiotic. Semiotic text communicates messages through something other than words. Complexity of text is also considered on a continuum of easy to hard. Once a set of text is selected it is located along the quadrant of the continuum that matches that type of text. Mapping text along the curriculum allows for a visual of the distribution of text used and is their a true balance of text (Laureate Education, Inc., 2010a) Hard Informational Linguistic SemioticNarrative Easy
  • IMPLEMENTATION • When selecting text for these students I had to keep in mind it had to be something that they could relate to and have fun learning in order to promote future positive reading experiences. In addition the text must meet their needs for instruction and independence. Websites offer opportunities for students to engage in their learning in a fun way as well as access content outside of school. When organizing for literacy instruction the purpose, components, theory, applications, strengths, and limitations must be identified and effectively addressed to promote student success (Tompkins, 2010) • Students are engaged with authentic and carefully selected text. Students are able to build literacy skills and content knowledge based on their interaction with text on their frustration, instructional, and independent level in an engaging way.
  • A BALANCED APPROACH Text Selected for 3 student participants. Animal Olympics: Lexile Level 451-500, Fountas and Pinnell Level-J, narrative, balance of semiotic and linguistic What is at the zoo?: Lexile Level BR-70, Fountas and Pinnell Level C- informational, semiotic Online Resource: What’s Wild about African Wild Dogs?, located at http://kids.nationalgeographic.com/kids/stories/animalsnature/african- wild-dogs/ - informational- linguistic
  • GIVE ME A FISH AND I EAT FOR A DAY. TEACH ME TO FISH AND I EAT FOR A LIFETIME. ---CHINESE PROVERB
  • After becoming familiar with student needs and text that will engage them appropriately, instruction is then organized. Objectives and instructional activities are selected that provide students structured and meaningful opportunities for learning (Tompkins, 2010). To help students become more strategic and metacognitive learners, instruction was organized based on the interactive, critical, and response literacy perspectives. Quality literacy instruction should have a balance of teacher-centered and student-centered activities (Tompkins (2010).
  • Framework for Literacy Instruction
  • INTERACTIVE PERSPECTIVE
  • • Activate prior knowledge • Modeling • Semantic Mapping • Read-aloud • Think-aloud • Questioning • Word skills • Partner- reading • Interactive games • journals STRATEGIES AND ACTIVITIES USED TO ADDRESS INTERACTIVE PERSPECTIVE
  • INTERACTIVE PERSPECTIVE ANALYSIS • Used to promote student strategic processing and metacognition each component of the lesson was modeled. The questions and graphic organizer was used to make what was abstract in their minds concrete. • During the pre-reading stage I set the tone by reading the objective to students and discussing the expectations for the lesson. The students were immediately engaged by the topic. We briefly went through the prior knowledge questions (see appendix) and this served as a great motivation for students. They were very excited to discuss their pets and animals that they have encountered. This was a great opportunity for me to remind them that when people find interest in a subject, books can be very helpful. Two of the students asked if they could borrow a book about animals before the lesson began. The discussion was captured on my anecdotal records. • This process of monitoring is a metacognitive strategy that good readers acquire in order to avoid confusion (Tompkins, 2010). • According to Tompkins, (2010) students use comprehension strategies not only to understand what they are reading, but also to understand when they are confused. I believe this was a beneficial demonstration of how to take action to solve a problem of confusion. In addition, an effective reading lessons utilizes a culmination of reading skills even though the focus is on one (Laureate Education, Inc., 2010b)
  • CRITICAL AND RESPONSE PERSPECTIVES
  • • Modeling • Making connections • Drawing inferences • Interactive writing • Questioning • Peer collaboration STRATEGIES AND ACTIVITIES USED TO ADDRESS CRITICAL PERSPECTIVE
  • CRITICAL AND RESPONSE PERSPECTIVES ANALYSIS • According to Dr. Almasi, critical readers and writers focus on the author’s purpose while reading (Laureate Education, Inc., 2010c). Students must also understand that the author’s meanings are not always directly stated in the text. • Students were able to respond critically to the group of texts by using the modeled reading strategies and skills. By including these perspectives in literacy instruction teachers are able to nurture student motivation and engagement in literacy activities. Students will be equipped with the skills that they need to seek out information in their everyday lives. More importantly, students will understand how to provide emotional responses to life circumstances in ways that they are comfortable because the teacher of the comfortable space and opportunity provided to them. The response perspective allows students to be affected on personal and emotional levels (Laureate Education, Inc., 2010d). Subsequently, my biggest take away is that a culmination of text that provides students with transformative power is best suited in a literate environment.
  • TO SUM IT UP, THIS PRESENTATION... • Discussed the importance of a balanced literacy approach. • Identified and evaluated the use of cognitive and non-cognitive assessments used to get to know literacy learners. • Examined the implications of authentic literature selections. • Defined instruction based on three instructional approaches: interactive, critical, and response instructional perspectives.
  • FEEDBACK 1. WHAT INSIGHTS DID YOU GAIN ABOUT LITERACY AND LITERACY INSTRUCTION FROM VIEWING THIS PRESENTATION? 2. HOW MIGHT THE INFORMATION PRESENTED CHANGE YOUR LITERACY PRACTICES AND/OR YOUR LITERACY INTERACTIONS WITH STUDENTS? 3. IN WHAT WAYS CAN I SUPPORT YOU IN THE LITERACY DEVELOPMENT OF YOUR STUDENTS OR CHILDREN? HOW MIGHT YOU SUPPORT ME IN MY WORK WITH STUDENTS OR YOUR CHILDREN? 4. WHAT QUESTIONS DO YOU HAVE?
  • REFERENCES Afflerbach, P. (2012). Understanding and using reading assessment, K–12 (2nd ed). Newark, DE: International Reading Association Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2010a). Analyzing and Selecting Text [Webcast]. In The beginning reader, pre-k-3. Baltimore: Author. Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2010b). Interactive Perspective [Webcast]. In The beginning reader, pre-k-3. Baltimore: Author. Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2010c). Critical Perspective [Webcast]. In The beginning reader, pre-k-3. Baltimore: Author. Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2010d). Response Perspective [Webcast]. In The beginning reader, pre-k-3. Baltimore: Author. McKenna, M. C., & Keer, D. J. (1990). Measuring attitude toward reading: A new tool for teachers. The Reading Teacher, 43(9), 626--639. Tompkins, G. E. (2010). Literacy for the 21st century: A balanced approach (5th ed.). Boston:Allyn & Bacon.