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Guest Lecture Cap Voor Ut
 

Guest Lecture Cap Voor Ut

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    Guest Lecture Cap Voor Ut Guest Lecture Cap Voor Ut Presentation Transcript

    • Guest Lecture MOTI University of Twente Technology Management & Business Innovation Capgemini Consulting is the strategy and transformation consulting brand of Capgemini Group
    • AGENDA • Introduction & Expectations • Business Innovation & Business Models • Case: From Technology to Product for a Financial Service Company • Questions 22
    • Introduction  Your Expectations  Capgemini & Consultancy  Today’s Literature NPD Process - Partnerships - Technology & Innovation Management -  Apply a market perspective – Case Financial Service Company 33
    • Well, we do not tell managers what to do… 44
    • Or how to do it… 55
    • Capgemini is a Global Service Provider: We are known for our knowledge, worldwide reach, and appreciated for the way we work together with our clients Capgemini’s approach: Collaborative Business Experience • Challenges with external The client and consultant together perspectives and insights • Lasting improvements Define Design Implement Partnership model • Equal partners problem solution solution • Common objectives It is the way you work that creates success • Measurable results Two traditional consultancy models that we don’t use: Consultant Speaks to Acts Client • Lack of ownership for solution Leadership model • Little engagement in Implements Defines problem implementation Develops solution • Outside project scope Consultant Client Speaks to Acts • Lack of ownership for solution Resource based model Develops solution Defines problem Implements • Little engagement in implementation 66
    • AGENDA • Introduction & Expectations • Business Innovation & Business Models • Case: From Technology to Product for a Financial Service Company • Questions 77
    • Common Mistakes around Innovation 88
    • Business Innovation Consulting is a team of innovators committed to realize measurable Business Value in collaboration with clients 99
    • A Business Model • … is a simplified representation of a company’s business logic • … describes what a company offers to its clients, how it reaches them and relates to them, through which resources activities and partners it achieves it and finally, how it earns money 10 10
    • The Business Model framework is a conceptual tool with the objective of expressing the business logic of a firm Resources Offer Customer Co-creation Partner Customer Network Relationship Core Value Value Distribution Customer Capabilities Configuration Proposition Channels Segment Cost Revenue PROFIT Structure Streams Financial Performance Adapted from Alexander Osterwalder, The Business Model Ontology, a proposition in a design science approach. 11 11
    • 1. Customer Relationships: Who are our Customers? Key Questions Resources Offer Customer Who do we create value for? Do any of these customers fit to be grouped into a Co-creation distinct category, because … … we propose them a distinct offer? Partner Customer … we reach them through different Network Relationship communication and distribution channels? … we entertain different relationships with them (more personal) … they have substantial different profitability Core Value Value Distribution Customer Capabilities Configuration Proposition Channels Segment Cost Revenue PROFIT Structure Streams Financial Performance Our group of customers with different characteristics Adapted from Alexander Osterwalder, The Business Model Ontology, a proposition in a design science approach. 12 12
    • 2. Value Proposition: What do we offer each of our client segments? Key Questions Resources Offer Customer What do we offer the market? Co-creation What is the specific bundle of products and services you offer each of the customer segments? Which customer needs does each value proposition cover? Partner Customer Do we offer different service levels to different Network Relationship Customer Segments? Core Value Value Distribution Customer Capabilities Configuration Proposition Channels Segment Cost Revenue PROFIT Structure Streams A bundle of products and services that satisfies a specific Financial Performance customer segment’s needs Adapted from Alexander Osterwalder, The Business Model Ontology, a proposition in a design science approach. 13 13
    • 3. Channels: How do we reach each of our client segments? Key Questions Resources Offer Customer Through which communication and distribution Co-creation channels do we reach our markets? How well does each channel work? How expensive or cost efficient is each of our channels? Partner Customer Through which communicationNetwork and distribution Relationship channels do we promote and deliver each value proposition? Through which channel do we reach each Customer Segment? Core Value Value Distribution Customer Capabilities Configuration Proposition Channels Segment Cost Revenue PROFIT Structure Streams The channels through which we communicate with our customers and Financial Performance through which we offer our value propositions Adapted from Alexander Osterwalder, The Business Model Ontology, a proposition in a design science approach. 14 14
    • 4. Client Relationship: How do we relate to our clients over time? Key Questions Resources Offer Customer Do we develop and maintain different types of client relationships in our business model, such as Co-creation more or less intense, more or less personal, etc? How resource intensive is each of these client relationship types in terms of time consumption Partner Customer and other costs? Network Relationship For each Customer Segment, which client relationship types and mechanisms do we develop and maintain? Core Value Value Distribution Customer Capabilities Configuration Proposition Channels Segment Cost Revenue PROFIT Structure Streams Financial Performance The types of relationships you entertain with each customer segment Adapted from Alexander Osterwalder, The Business Model Ontology, a proposition in a design science approach. 15 15
    • 5. Revenue Streams: How do we earn money? Key Questions Resources Offer Customer What are our revenue streams? What are the revenue streams from each customer Co-creation segment and Value Proposition? How much is each revenue stream’s contribution to overall revenue in terms of percentages? Partner Customer Network Relationship Core Value Value Distribution Customer Capabilities Configuration Proposition Channels Segment Cost Revenue PROFIT Structure Streams Financial Performance The streams through which we earn our revenue from our customers for value creating and customer facing activities 16 16 Adapted from Alexander Osterwalder, The Business Model Ontology, a proposition in a design science approach.
    • 6. Core Capabilities: Based on which capabilities & assets are we running our business? Key Questions Resources Offer Customer What are the key resources we rely on to run our Co-creation business model? How does each of these resources relate to our Value Proposition and their corresponding Customer Segments, Channels, and Relationships? Partner Customer Network Relationship Core Value Value Distribution Customer Capabilities Configuration Proposition Channels Segment Cost Revenue PROFIT Structure Streams The key resources we Financial Performance need to make our business model function 17 17 Adapted from Alexander Osterwalder, The Business Model Ontology, a proposition in a design science approach.
    • 7. Value Configuration: What key activities we need to run our business model? Key Questions Resources Offer Customer What are the main activities we operate to run our Co-creation business model? On which Core Capabilities do they rely? To which Value Proposition, Channels or Relationships do they contribute? Partner Customer Network Relationship Core Value Value Distribution Customer Capabilities Configuration Proposition Channels Segment Cost Revenue PROFIT Structure Streams The most important activities that have to be performed Financial Performance to run our business model 18 18 Adapted from Alexander Osterwalder, The Business Model Ontology, a proposition in a design science approach.
    • 8. Partner Network: With which partners do we leverage our business? Key Questions Resources Offer Customer Which partners and suppliers do we work with? Co-creation Which Core Capabilities do they relate to? To which Value Propositions, Channels or Relationships do they contribute? Partner Customer Network Relationship Core Value Value Distribution Customer Capabilities Configuration Proposition Channels Segment Cost Revenue PROFIT Structure Streams Financial Performance The partners and suppliers we work with to run our Business Model 19 19 Adapted from Alexander Osterwalder, The Business Model Ontology, a proposition in a design science approach.
    • 9. Cost Structure: What are our most important costs? Key Questions Resources Offer Customer What are the most important cost positions in our Co-creation Business Model? Can the cost positions be easily connected to a Business Model building block? Can costs be calculated for each Customer Partner Customer Segment? Relationship Network Core Value Value Distribution Customer Capabilities Configuration Proposition Channels Segment Cost Revenue PROFIT Structure Streams Financial Performance The costs we incur running our Business Model 20 20 Adapted from Alexander Osterwalder, The Business Model Ontology, a proposition in a design science approach.
    • Examples of Business Models with different focus points 21 21
    • AGENDA • Introduction & Expectations • Business Innovation & Business Models • Case: From Technology to Product for a Financial Service Company • Questions 22 22
    • A Financial Service Company wants to launch a contactless payment technology  Contactless payment allows consumers to make payments without having to hand over or swipe a payment card.  No signature or PIN is needed  The technology is mostly a smart card chip, embedded in a card, key fobs, cell phones or wristbands.  Benefits for consumers: more convenient to use and fast payment 23 23
    • Current Situation  Technology is not the issue: technologically contactless payment is possible  High competitive market, substitutable payments concepts are available (Ideal, Payter, debit, credit and cash)  The question for this company is not: how does the technology work, but what new product can we develop with this technology?  This company is a small part of the value chain, so it needs partners to succesfully launch a contactless payment product 24 24
    • The Financial Service Company needs support in the Concept and Design phases Innovation Concept Design Target & Scope Commercialization Strategy I. II. III. IV. V. Focus areas within the Definition of gate gate organization Innovation Strategy Topic 1 Idea Review of approach GoLive • Identify and generation Topic 2 Market Entry pursue trends • List of Proposed projects • Decide on projects to be • Corporate reviewed in detail Topic 3 Business Model positioning • Further review • Partner • Prioritization & resourcing Value Chain strategy Performance Rewarding measures 25 25
    • Let’s use the Business Model to further develop the idea for the Financial Services Company into a Concept Resources Offer Customer Co-creation Partner Customer Network Relationship Core Value Value Distribution Customer Capabilities Configuration Proposition Channels Segment Cost Revenue PROFIT Structure Streams Financial Performance Adapted from Alexander Osterwalder, The Business Model Ontology, a proposition in a design science approach. 26 26
    • AGENDA • Introduction & Expectations • Business Innovation & Business Models • Case: From Technology to Product for a Financial Service Company • Questions 27 27
    • Questions 28 28
    • Isabelle Thijssen | Capgemini Consulting NL Daan Giesen | Capgemini Consulting NL Consultant Business Innovation Consulting Consultant Business Innovation Consulting isabel.thijssen@capgemini.com daan.giesen@capgemini.com +31 6 15030403 +31 6 27159293 29 29