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ppt Ohm's law

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  • 1. Ohm’s Law by: Muhamad Abdul Jalil (09330271)
  • 2.
    • Standart of competence :
    • 5. To a pply electricity concept in various problem and a variety technology product.
    • Basic competence :
    • 5. 1. To Formulates the mulberry of electricity is closed series ( one loop)
  • 3.
    • Indicator :
    • To f ormulate the mulberry of electric current strength in closed series (the electric current strength).
    • To f ormulate the mulberry of electric resistance strength series (the electric resistance strength).
    • To f ormulate the mulberry of tension insimple closed series uses Kirchof Law II .
  • 4. Ohm’s Law
    • Current through an ideal conductor is proportional to the applied voltage
      • Conductor is also known as a resistor
      • An ideal conductor is a material whose resistance does not change with temperature
    • For an ohmic device,
      • V = Voltage (Volts = V)
      • I = Current (Amperes = A)
      • R = Resistance (Ohms = Ω )
  • 5. Current and Voltage Defined
    • Conventional Current : (the current in electrical circuits)
    • Flow of current from positive terminal to the negative terminal.
    • - has units of Amperes (A) and is measured using ammeters .
    • Voltage :
    • Energy required to move a charge from one point to another.
    • - has units of Volts (V) and is measured using voltmeters .
    Think of voltage as what pushes the electrons along in the circuit, and current as a group of electrons that are constantly trying to reach a state of equilibrium .
  • 6. Ohmic Resistors
    • Metals obey Ohm’s Law linearly so long as their temperature is held constant
      • Their resistance values do not fluctuate with temperature
        • the resistance for each resistor is a constant
    • Most ohmic resistors will behave non-linearly outside of a given range of temperature, pressure, etc.
  • 7. Voltage and Current Relationship for Linear Resistors Voltage and current are linear when resistance is held constant.
  • 8. Ohm’s Law continued
    • The total resistance of a circuit is dependant on the number of resistors in the circuit and their configuration
      • Series Circuit
      • Parallel Circuit
  • 9. Kirchhoff’s Current Law
    • Current into junction = Current leaving junction
    The amount of current that enters a junction is equivalent to the amount of current that leaves the junction
  • 10. Kirchhoff’s Voltage Law
    • Net Voltage for a circuit = 0
    Sum of all voltage rises and voltage drops in a circuit (a closed loop) equals zero
  • 11. Series Circuit
    • Current is constant
    • Why?
      • Only one path for the current to take
  • 12. Series Equivalent Circuit
  • 13. Parallel Circuit
    • Voltage is constant
    • Why ?
      • There are 3 closed loops in the circuit
  • 14. Parallel Equivalent Circuits
  • 15.
    • We’ve now looked at how basic electrical circuits work with resistors that obey Ohm’s Law linearly.
    • We understand quantitatively how these resistors work using the relationship V=IR, but lets see qualitatively using light bulbs.
  • 16.
    • Matur
    • THANKYOU