• Save
TechnoEduPreneur 30 Mei 2013 Higher Education 21st Century Learning
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

TechnoEduPreneur 30 Mei 2013 Higher Education 21st Century Learning

on

  • 835 views

Future Paradigms in the Education: ...

Future Paradigms in the Education:
- Strong impact of the birth of globalization will result in a change in management strategy of education and training
- For that requires knowledge of education and learning methods are new
- The structure of skills and knowledge to support changing lifelong learning and continuous learning that serves to prepare peoples to meet the demands or institution interests

Statistics

Views

Total Views
835
Views on SlideShare
830
Embed Views
5

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
0
Comments
0

1 Embed 5

https://twitter.com 5

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

TechnoEduPreneur 30 Mei 2013 Higher Education 21st Century Learning Presentation Transcript

  • 1. 21st Century Learningat Higher EducationDjadja.Sardjana, S.T., M.M.Djadja@comlabs.ac.idwww.slideshare.net/djadja
  • 2. About meEDUCATIONIndonesia Education University (www.upi.ac.id)2013 expectedDoctoral Candidate, Majoring on Education Managementwith concentration on Knowledge Management & e-Learning/E-Learning.Telkom Management Institute (www.imtelkom.ac.id)MBA on Telecommunication Business (Biztel), Cum Laude Graduate (3.71 from 4.0)with Theses “Role of Grameen Telecom Stakeholder at Bangladesh on Strategic Management”National Technology Institute (www.itenas.ac.id)May 30, 1990Bachelor on Telecommunication Engineering, with Theses “Simulation of Automatic Direction Finder on Airplane”EXPERIENCECouncil Member | Gerson Lehrman GroupMay 2009 - NowDIVISION HEAD | SAMPOERNA TELEKOMUNIKASI INDONESIAMay 2008 – April 2009SENIOR MANAGER | MOTOROLA, INC.November 2002 – April 2008SENIOR MANAGER | MWEB, INC.June 2001 – October 2002IT MANAGER | Ariawest InternationalJanuary 1997- May 2001SUPERVISOR, CTS | AT&T/Lucent Technologies IndonesiaJUNE 1994 – JANUARY 1997Lecture| Sekolah Tinggi Telekomunikasi Telkom (STTTelkom)February 1991 – May 19946-Jun-13 221st Century Learning
  • 3. INTRODUCTIONA_Vision_ofStudents_Today-4m44
  • 4. Education Challenges in Indonesia6-Jun-13 21st Century Learning 4Therefore, various alternative strategies relating to the problem needs toexplored, studied and applied.But when watching the situation geography, socio-economic and culturaldiversity of Indonesia, it is clear that it was not adequate anymore (notpractical) when only relying on the ways of traditional solutions alone.The main vehicle in the development of human resources is education andtraining.
  • 5. Information Necessity on Education6-Jun-13 21st Century Learning 5Information is already a commodity as likeother economic goods.  Without runawayfrom “ Philosophy of Education “The role of information become increasinglylarge and visible in the modern world it is todayincluding on education.This is understandable because the public nowto the era of information society (informationage) or community knowledge (knowledgesociety)
  • 6. Future Paradigms in the Education6-Jun-13 21st Century Learning 6The structure of skillsand knowledge tosupport changinglifelong learning andcontinuous learningthat serves to prepareworkers to meet thedemands or institutioninterestsFor that requiresknowledge ofeducation andlearning methods arenewStrong impact of thebirth of globalizationwill result in a changein managementstrategy of educationand training
  • 7. “Books will soon be obsolete in the schools. . . .It is possible to teach every branch of humanknowledge with the motion picture. Our schoolsystem will be completely changed”Thomas Edison, 1913Influence of Technology on Education6-Jun-13 21st Century Learning 7
  • 8. What are the signals for thenext 10 years? Near future (12 months) Interactive e-books Personal and mobile learning Open social learning Assessment for learning Medium future (2-3 years) Augmented reality Game-based learning Learning design and orchestration Longer term (4-5 years) Gesture based computing Learning analytics Learning toolkits Intelligent tutoring?Educause Horizon Report 2011http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/HR2011.pdf6-Jun-13 21st Century Learning 8
  • 9. Comparison on 20th and 21stCentury LearningMobilelearning-1m14
  • 10. Nature of 20th century learning6-Jun-13 21st Century Learning 10
  • 11. 6-Jun-13 21st Century Learning 11
  • 12. Strengths of 20th Century learningThe “signature practices”, as summarised by Carrington(2006, p.103), include: Higher order thinking, holistic thinking, critical thinking,problem-solving and lifelong learning Learner-centred (relevant and meaningful; connectinglearning to students lives outside of school) Integrated and negotiated curriculum Co-operative and collaborative learning Authentic, reflective and outcomes-based assessment Heterogeneous and flexible student groupings6-Jun-13 21st Century Learning 12
  • 13. Weaknesses of 20th century learning Curricula not applied locally or contextually Learning decontextualised; not problematised Low levels of intellectual challenge for students Acceptance of binaries – either / or; not sophisticated oruseful Lack of explicit teaching ANDlack of student autonomy andcreativity Lack of student direction oftheir learning Lack of student learning motivationand engagement6-Jun-13 21st Century Learning 13
  • 14. Nature of 21st century learning6-Jun-13 21st Century Learning 14
  • 15. 6-Jun-13 21st Century Learning 15
  • 16. Past and Future SchoolingLearning feature Past FutureWhere learning takes place Mainly in schools In schools (including studio schools,learning villages and open campuses),cultural centres, businesses, virtualcentres and other sitesWho we learn from Teachers Teachers, parents, other skilled adults,peers and social networksLearning mode Instruction Interaction, collaboration. More learningby doing and discoveryWhen we learn In school terms and hours. The lesson All the time, in different periods thatmore suit individual learningAssessment End of the line. Focus on cognitive skills During learning for better learning. Morepeer-to-peer evaluation and selfevaluation against learning plans. Morefocus on non-cognitive skillsHow we learn In classroom, from books, whiteboards More real world learning. Schools asproductive unitsFunding To schools and school boards More to pupils, learning and networksStandards/measures Top down More bottom-up targets and selfevaluation(Leadbeater, 2008, p.69)6-Jun-13 21st Century Learning 16
  • 17. Research into 21st Century LearningOnline Key resources:http://learning21c.wordpress.com/UWS 21st Century Learning research BlogiNET (International Networking for Educational Transformation)iNET AustraliaCisco Global Education Leaders Programhttps://www.transformglobaleducation.orgNew Media Consortium Horizon Report– emerging technologiesCharles Leadbeater Home PageInnovation Unit, UK‘Personalised learning’ report from Futurelab6-Jun-13 21st Century Learning 17
  • 18. BooksCarrington, V. (2006). Rethinking middleyears. Early adolescents, schooling anddigital culture. St Leonards, NSW: Allen& Unwin.Leadbeater, C. (2008). What’s next? 21ideas for 21st century learning. London:The Innovation Unit.Miliband, D. (2006). Choice and voice inpersonalised learning. In Organisationfor Economic Co-operation andDevelopment (Ed.). Personalisingeducation. Paris: OECD.Research into 21st Century Learning6-Jun-13 21st Century Learning 18
  • 19. University of the 21st CenturyMobilelearning-1m14
  • 20. FUTURE | can go both ways6-Jun-13 21st Century Learning 20
  • 21. EITHER WAY | how do we prepare the population?6-Jun-13 21st Century Learning 21
  • 22. Coping with |UNCERTAINTY|6-Jun-13 21st Century Learning 22
  • 23. Making the |TRANSITION|6-Jun-13 21st Century Learning 23
  • 24. CHALLENGES| for universities world-wideIncreasing DEMANDfor higher educationproliferation ofPLACES whereknowledge isproducedINTERNATIONALISATION of education andresearchREORGANISATION ofknowledgeUniversity – IndustryCOLLABORATIONemergence of newEXPECTATIONS2003-2013EuropeanCommission-106-Jun-13 21st Century Learning 24
  • 25. CRITICAL SKILLS | are the much needed skills?Over the PAST FIVE YEARS which of the following hasbeen the most important management skill at yourcompany?2008-2013-05Economist Intelligence Unit(EIU) study commissioned byPMI in 20136-Jun-13 21st Century Learning 25
  • 26. CRITICAL SKILLS | are the much needed skills?Over the NEXT FIVE YEARS, which of the followingskills will be most important to your institution success?2013-2018+05Economist Intelligence Unit(EIU) study commissioned byPMI in 20136-Jun-13 21st Century Learning 26
  • 27. CHALLENGES| USA SurveyAccording to the National Association of Collegesand Employers (NACE), USA, Job Outlook 2010survey:1. Communication Skills2. Analytical Skills3. Teamwork Skills4. Technical Skills5. Strong Work Ethic AUGUST 26, 2010, 10:00 AM ET20106-Jun-13 21st Century Learning 27
  • 28. CHALLENGES| Malaysian surveyA study conducted by the Federation of MalaysianManufacturers (FMM) on reasons why graduatesunemployed:1. Lack of industrial training2. Poor communication skills especially poorcommand of English language3. low problem-solving skills4. lack of self-confidence5. Poor work attitude Saturday February 27, 2010 MYT 9:11:00 PM20106-Jun-13 21st Century Learning 28
  • 29. CRITICAL SKILLS | are the much needed skills?In your opinion, which skills will be in most demand fromemployers OVER THE NEXT DECADE? Select up to three. (%respondents)21stCentury andbeyond20096-Jun-13 21st Century Learning 29
  • 30. SURVIVETHE DISTRUPTIVE CHANGEWe NEED our population be able to…6-Jun-13 21st Century Learning 30
  • 31. ROLES | of universities are changingOver the decades, fundamental roles of universities are CREATING,PRESERVING, INTEGRATING, TRANSMITTING, AND APPLYINGKNOWLEDGE. While these fundamental roles of the university do notchange over time, the particular realisation of these roles dochange—and change quite dramatically, in fact.‘DIGITAL’ GENERATION learnersapproach learning in a different way.Unaccustomed and unwilling to learnsequentially—rather inclined to PLUNGEIN and LEARN THROUGHPARTICIPATION ANDEXPERIMENTATION.6-Jun-13 21st Century Learning 31
  • 32. CONNECT | COMMUNICATE | COLLABORATE |6-Jun-13 21st Century Learning 32
  • 33. POWER HOUSE| Universities plays a vital role inpreparing the global populationCHALLENGE• Delivering programmes that are highlyinnovative• Producing graduates that are ready for thejobs that are not even created• Solving problems that are yet to exist• Using tools and techniques that are yet to bedeveloped6-Jun-13 21st Century Learning 33
  • 34. NEEDEDover and aboveexisting competency toSURVIVEREQUIREDFundamentalcompetency toPERFORM6-Jun-13 21st Century Learning 34
  • 35. faculty members of the 21st Century university will be asked toset aside their roles as teachers and instead becomeDESIGNERS OF LEARNING EXPERIENCES, PROCESSES,AND ENVIRONMENTS.they may be asked to develop collective learning experiencesin which students work together and learn together with thefaculty member becoming more of a CONSULTANT OR ACOACH than a teacher.6-Jun-13 21st Century Learning 35
  • 36. faculty members MUSTmove in-line with the changeCONNECT | COMMUNICATE | COLLABORATE |6-Jun-13 21st Century Learning 36
  • 37. BRICKS CLICKSRegulators MUSTmove in-line with the change6-Jun-13 21st Century Learning 37
  • 38. BOOKS DEVICESUniversity MUSTmove in-line with the change6-Jun-13 21st Century Learning 38
  • 39. CHALLENGES| being creativeINDUSTRYLinkageUNIVERSITYPERSONNELAcademicand Non-AcademicPOLICIESandPROCEDURESINDUSTRYPlayersPLAYERSCommitmentsREGULATORSPOLICIESandPROCEDURESPERSONNELCOLLECTIVEDESTINY6-Jun-13 21st Century Learning 39
  • 40. Learning Context Mediation AgentsDelivered LocationClassroomHomeWorkplaceField ...CommunicationSynchronousAsynchronousStudentsReflective PeersCollaborative TeachersSimulation SettingSingleCo-locatedDistributedVirtualAvatarsConstruction ProcessTeacher ledSelf-managedPeerTeamworkInquiry-drivenProblem-solvingCase-basedCross-context TechnologyRoomDesktopTabletLaptopPhone ...RepresentationsTextsImagesVirtual worldsAnnotations ...Game-basedAssessingPerformative SubjectGeographyGeologyTourismHistory...ConversationalNetworkedBrowsingEmbodied6-Jun-13 21st Century Learning 40
  • 41. LectureLearning Context Mediation AgentsDelivered LocationClassroomHomeWorkplaceField ...CommunicationSynchronousAsynchronousStudentsReflective ? PeersCollaborative TeachersSimulation SettingSingleCo-locatedDistributedVirtualAvatarsConstruction ProcessTeacher ledSelf-managedPeerTeamworkInquiry-drivenProblem-solvingCase-basedCross-context TechnologyRoomDesktopTabletLaptopPhone ...RepresentationsTextsImagesVirtual worldsAnnotations ...Game-basedAssessingPerformative SubjectGeographyGeologyTourismHistory...ConversationalNetworkedBrowsingEmbodied6-Jun-13 21st Century Learning 41
  • 42. MOOC (Massive open online course)Learning Context Mediation AgentsDelivered LocationClassroomHomeWorkplaceField ...CommunicationSynchronousAsynchronousStudentsReflective PeersCollaborative TeachersSimulation SettingSingleCo-locatedDistributedVirtualAvatarsConstruction ProcessTeacher ledSelf-managedPeerTeamworkInquiry-drivenProblem-solvingCase-basedCross-context TechnologyRoomDesktopTabletLaptopPhone ...RepresentationsTextsImagesVirtual worldsAnnotations ...Game-basedAssessingPerformative SubjectGeographyGeologyTourismHistory...ConversationalNetworkedBrowsingEmbodied6-Jun-13 21st Century Learning 42
  • 43. E-learning in the 1990s Technology- enhanced learning in the2000sConstructivist learning Social-constructivist learningOnline learning Blended learningVLEs and MLEs Personal Learning EnvironmentsMedia-equipped teaching rooms Flexible learning spacesDesktop computer rooms Support for students with multiplepersonal technologiesCreating re-usable learning objects Open learning and student-created mediaCollaborative learning Open social learningEvaluation of learning gains Evaluation of learning transformationsWhere is our institution?A: Leftcolumn?A: Leftcolumn?B: Intransition?B: Intransition?C: Rightcolumn?C: Rightcolumn?6-Jun-13 21st Century Learning 43
  • 44. E-LEARNING POLICY ININDONESIA HIGHEREDUCATIONLight anEducational Fire1m15
  • 45. (Leithwood, et al., 1998)6-Jun-13 4521st Century Learning
  • 46. Current Target of E-learning Policyin Indonesia Higher Education6-Jun-13 21st Century Learning 46ICT literacy (ability to access, utilize and use the radio,television, computers and the Internet) of the studentsand faculty with strengthening on Governance,Accountability, and Public ImageEnhanced capacity of higher education unit conductedthrough competitive grant programs run bygovernments such as competitive grant programs,partnership programs, research grants, educationdevelopment center and instructional activitiesManagement capacity building will also be supportedby the application of Information and CommunicationTechnology (ICT), such as the development of highereducation information systemSource: Education Strategic Plan of the Ministry of Education 2009-2014
  • 47. Operational E-learning Policyin Indonesia Higher Education6-Jun-13 21st Century Learning 47In Book VI - ACCREDITATION ASSESSMENT INSTRUMENTS FOR GRADUATEPROGRAM STUDY also described in detail the policy "Access and utilization ofinformation systems in managing data and information on the implementation ofacademic programs in the course of study”The accreditation document (BOOK IIIB) point 6.4.1 (Information Systems) as follows:"Describe the management information systems and facilities of ICT (Information andCommunication Technology) used the Faculty / School for the academic administrationand administration (eg SIAKAD, SIMKEU, SIMAWA, SIMFA, SIMPEG and the like),including distance / e-learning. Explain utilization in decision-making processes in thedevelopment of institutionsSource: The accreditation document of the Ministry of Education - 2008
  • 48. Operational E-learning Policyin Indonesia Higher Education6-Jun-13 21st Century Learning 48Source: The accreditation document of the Ministry of Education -2008
  • 49. ConclusionFocus onSolution notProblem-1m12
  • 50. Teaching & Learning is byits very definition is acyclical force that seeks tospiral forward in order toadvance into the future.(Philip Cragg, 2012)
  • 51. 21st Century Learner(The Partnership for 21st Century Skills, 2008)21stCenturyLearnerTechnologyLiterate andAdeptMedia SavvyFlexible andDynamicMultitaskingCommunicators andCollaboratorsInteractive andNetworked Reflective andCriticalInstantCreative andAdaptiveStudentcentric, LifeLong Learners& AnywhereAnytimeLearnersHaveMultimodalLearningStyles21st Century Learning6-Jun-13 51
  • 52. 21st Century Educator(The Partnership for 21st Century Skills, 2008)21st Century Learning6-Jun-13 52
  • 53. Higher EducationE-Learning in Indonesia6-Jun-13 21st Century Learning 53E-Learningwill be usedor not depends ongovernment policyin education andhow users viewor assess the e-learning.Generally the use of these technologies depends on:(1). Is the technology was already a requirement?, (2).Is adequate supporting facilities?, (3). Is supported byadequate funding?, and (4). Is there support frompolicy makers?
  • 54. E-Learning Prerequisites forHigher Education in Indonesia6-Jun-13 21st Century Learning 54Many people often try to launch e-learning withoutcareful consideration and use it to look prestigiouswithout Management Policy and Strategy Education.Therefore one thing to note before using the Internetfor learning, the policy analysis to answer whether itrequires e-learning.In this analysis would have included whether it istechnically and non-technical e-learning can becarried out this analysis regarding the availability ofPeople, Process and Technology.
  • 55. 6-Jun-13 21st Century Learning 55E-Learning in IndonesiaNeed Social Economic AnalysisEconomic analysis• Economic analysissuch as Cost Benefit(B / C) ratio, theInternal Rate ofReturn (IRR), NetPresent Value (NPV)or Return onInvestment (ROI)can be used as ameasuring tool.Social Analysis• Furthermorewhether socially, theuse of e-learningmust be accepted bythe community(sociallyacceptable).Resistances• Becausesometimes, althoughthe usage of e-learning for learninghas been preparedproperly and operatequality is also good,people can notaccept it becausethey consider theways ofconventionaleducation isconsidered better.
  • 56. Thank you very muchfor your attentionDjadja.Sardjana, S.T., M.M.Djadja@comlabs.itb.ac.idwww.slideshare.net/djadjaDasar ManajemenProyek by DjadjaSardjana-2m45