Prasetya Mulya Lecture: New Media Technology

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Prasetya Mulya Lecture on New Media Technology 12May09

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Prasetya Mulya Lecture: New Media Technology

  1. 1. New Media Technology For Young Generation Lecture by: Djadja Sardjana , MM (djadja.sardjana@gmail.com) Monday, May 11, 2009 Prasetya Mulya Business School 1
  2. 2. A Highlight Lecture : New Media Technology for Young Generation Monday, May 11, 2009 Prasetya Mulya Business School 2
  3. 3. Definition 2:34 Monday, May 11, 2009 Prasetya Mulya Business School 3
  4. 4. Three levels of ‘new’ media (Lievrouw and Livingstone) 1. Artifacts and devices (technologies themselves) 2. Communications practices (how we use them) 3. Social and institutional arrangements that support and enable them Source : Professor Terry Flew Monday, May 11, 2009 Prasetya Mulya Business School 4
  5. 5. History of ‘old’ media tells us something about ‘new’ media Long-standing utopian/dystopian assumptions about technology ‘cyberspace myth’ (Mosco) - promise of an alternative reality Technology out of control (Frankenstein, 2001: A Space Odyssey, Blade Runner, Terminator films) ‘Lag’ between introduction of a new technology and its broader social implications can be up to 50 years e.g. electrification and modern industry, cities and commerce Source : Professor Terry Flew Monday, May 11, 2009 Prasetya Mulya Business School 5
  6. 6. Classic ‘new media’ debates Marshall McLuhan (Understanding Media, 1964) ‘the medium is the message’ Media influence not only what we think but how we think Many of the changes associated with media are imperceptible Internet: key is not what is on it but how it ‘networks’ us Raymond Williams (Television: Technology and Cultural Form, 1974) Technologies are socially shaped by relations of power, conflict and control Technologies develop in different places in different ways Huge corporate and government investments in controlling new media Jonathon Zittrain, The Future of the Internet, and how to stop it Source : Professor Terry Flew Monday, May 11, 2009 Prasetya Mulya Business School 6
  7. 7. The Machine Is Us/ing Us 4:33 Monday, May 11, 2009 Prasetya Mulya Business School 7
  8. 8. What are they talking about? Source : Erab Fuqaha Monday, May 11, 2009 Prasetya Mulya Business School 8
  9. 9. How It Works 3:44 Lecture : New Media Technology for Young Generation Monday, May 11, 2009 Prasetya Mulya Business School 9
  10. 10. You and The New Media Monday, May 11, 2009 Prasetya Mulya Business School 10
  11. 11. New Media Conversions Source: Professional Convention Management Association Monday, May 11, 2009 Prasetya Mulya Business School 11
  12. 12. New Media Geography Source: Professional Convention Management Association Monday, May 11, 2009 Prasetya Mulya Business School 12
  13. 13. New Media & You In Action 5:29 Source: Professional Convention Management Association Monday, May 11, 2009 Prasetya Mulya Business School 13
  14. 14. Working with New Media (1) ‒ Key concepts from Virtual Cultures: Data Information Knowledge Wisdom (‘DIKW’) Finding Evaluating Understanding Sharing • Data Information: Finding relations between data • Information Knowledge: Evaluating patterns in the relations • Knowledge Wisdom: Understanding the underlying principles • Information Communication Collective Intelligence Sharing your knowledge and understanding Source: Dr Axel Bruns Monday, May 11, 2009 Prasetya Mulya Business School 14
  15. 15. Working with New Media (2) Convergence Culture (Henry Jenkins): DIY, participatory culture (especially enabled through new media technologies) media consumers become media creators and distributors repurposing, remixing, mashing up content (“Rip. Mix. Burn.”) Produsage: no fixed producer / consumer roles – everyone can be a produser collaborative DIY outcomes are always temporary, never finished shift of business from selling finished products to offering support services (as producer) content producer content (as user) Source: Dr Axel Bruns Monday, May 11, 2009 Prasetya Mulya Business School 15
  16. 16. Produsage in Context Produsage Environment commercial / non-profit harvesting of user- (populated by produsers) generated content content development space set up by (e.g. The Sims, Wikipedia community or on CD-ROM) company to commercial / non-profit harbour produsage services to support (e.g. Wikimedia produsage Foundation; Google; (e.g. Red Hat, SourceForge) SourceForge) valuable, often commercial-grade content is created initial IP contributions commercial activities by users from individuals, the themselves, harnessing the hive public domain, or commercial sources (e.g. support services, consultancies, content sales) collaborative, iterative, evolutionary, palimpsestic user-led content development Source: Dr Axel Bruns Monday, May 11, 2009 Prasetya Mulya Business School 16
  17. 17. Implification & Impact Lecture : New Media Technology for Young Generation Monday, May 11, 2009 Prasetya Mulya Business School 17
  18. 18. Impact on Identity and Social Relations Use of new media for communication, networking, community Younger users seen as ‘digital natives’ (Prensky) of the new media environment Understanding of user groups as ‘virtual communities’ (Rheingold) Playful creation of online identities (Turkle) with meaningful social lives Move beyond ‘virtual’ / ‘real’ distinctions New media as cultural technologies, affecting our culture and identity “Time and space, body and mind, subject and object, human and machine are each dramatically transformed by practices carried out on networked computers” (Poster) Source : Professor Terry Flew, 49-54 Monday, May 11, 2009 Prasetya Mulya Business School 18
  19. 19. Impact on Political Economy and Cultural Studies Political economy: focus on economic and industrial dynamics relating economic power to political influence highlighting inequalities of access to technology skeptical of potential of new media for social transformation Cultural studies: focus on active role of audiences and resistance to corporate domination pointing to the political power of dispersed community dynamics highlighting user-led new media phenomena optimistic about the ability of new media to transform society Source : Professor Terry Flew, 54-57 Monday, May 11, 2009 Prasetya Mulya Business School 19
  20. 20. Internet as New Media Impact Source: DiMaggio et. al., 2001 Monday, May 11, 2009 Prasetya Mulya Business School 20
  21. 21. Five rules of virtuality Both uptake and use of new media are critically dependent on non-ICT factors (age, employment, income, education, gender, nationality) Fears and risks associated with new media re. unevenly socially distributed esp. around security and surveillance ‘Virtual’ interactions complement, rather than supplement or replace, ‘real’ activities More scope for ‘virtual’ interactions acts as stimulus for face-to- face interactions Global communications creates demands for localism and ‘real’ experience Source: Flew, 2008, p. 37 Monday, May 11, 2009 Prasetya Mulya Business School 21
  22. 22. Beyond Technological Determinism Technological developments only part of the full picture socioeconomic factors also affect technology adoption 4:44 technologies are reshaped as people begin to use them new systems of knowledge and meaning can emerge in the process Source: Flew, 2008, Flew 42-46 Monday, May 11, 2009 Prasetya Mulya Business School 22
  23. 23. Future of New Media Lecture : New Media Technology for Young Generation Monday, May 11, 2009 Prasetya Mulya Business School 23
  24. 24. The World Today Source: Instat, Global Market Trends, Oct-2008 Monday, May 11, 2009 Prasetya Mulya Business School 24
  25. 25. Future Changes Source: Instat, Global Market Trends, Oct-2008 Monday, May 11, 2009 Prasetya Mulya Business School 25
  26. 26. Digital Kids Are Coming! Source: Instat, Global Market Trends, Oct-2008 Monday, May 11, 2009 Prasetya Mulya Business School 26
  27. 27. The Implication Surprising Business Model 10 Years Age 20 Years Age Characteristic Implication Characteristic Implication Bought > 100 juta - Online Entertainment Autonomous IT - Technology Option copies Harry Potter - Digital Library ) Manager Program VCRs for - Home Digital Convergence Multiple Video Game - Traffic Growth, their parents Service. Devices - Online Entertainment & - Broadband - Broadband Memainkan Video - Online Entertainment Download & Burning - Traffic Growth, Game portable Music - Online Entertainment Play Portable Video - Home Digital Convergence Sharing Music & - Traffic Growth, Games Service Media - Online Entertainment Text message on a - End-users Mobility, Nimble messaging - End-users Mobility, Cell-Phone - SMS, with Cell Phones - SMS & MMS, - Traffic Growth, - Traffic Growth, On-line for Mail, - Traffic Growth, Living & Carrying - End-users Mobility, Instant Messaging, - Online Entertainment Portable Media - Traffic Growth, Friendster etc Devices - Online Entertainment Use a Digital - MMS, Owns portable PC & - Technology Option Camera - Traffic Growth, web pages - Home Digital Convergence Service. - Broadband Source: Instat, Global Market Trends, Oct-2008 Monday, May 11, 2009 Prasetya Mulya Business School 27
  28. 28. New Media Careers Content creation e.g. as journalists, copywriters, artists, knowledge workers, etc. finding evaluating understanding sharing Content management e.g. research related to your job, internal company materials, public Web information managing information and knowledge bases Community coordination e.g. building strong user (customer) relations, encouraging users to become produsers managing user expectations and enthusiasm, managing participation processes Planning building maintaining social media spaces and their information Source: Dr Axel Bruns Monday, May 11, 2009 Prasetya Mulya Business School 28
  29. 29. New Media Careers Examples Trendwatching.com newsletter / consultancy on new and emerging trends (esp. online) “Generation C”, “Customer-Made”, “Lifecaching”, “Minipreneurs”, … network of 8,000+ Springspotters, tracking ideas through Springwise “crowdsourcing”, “coolfinding” processes managed by Trendwatching staff 3.20 Think MTV Street Team ’08 citizen journalism reporting on U.S. presidential election (and beyond) uncovering new stories and covering unusual points of view 51 young citizen reporters throughout the U.S., using mobile media technologies publication and discussion managed by MTV staff How do they negotiate between commercial and community interests? (plus: content quality, intellectual property, legal liability, social dynamics, …) Source: Dr Axel Bruns Monday, May 11, 2009 Prasetya Mulya Business School 29
  30. 30. New Media Further Reading Nicholas Carr, “Is Google making us stupid? What the Internet is doing to our brains” The Atlantic Online, July/August 2008 “Never has a communications system played so many roles in our lives—or exerted such broad influence over our thoughts—as the Internet does today. Yet, for all that’s been written about the Net, there’s been little consideration of how, exactly, it’s reprogramming us. The Net’s intellectual ethic remains obscure.” Monday, May 11, 2009 Prasetya Mulya Business School 30
  31. 31. Conclusion: 2:48 Everything is changing! Monday, May 11, 2009 Prasetya Mulya Business School 31
  32. 32. The End Lecture : New Media Technology for Young Generation Monday, May 11, 2009 Prasetya Mulya Business School 32

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