Diversity in plants
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Diversity in plants

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    Diversity in plants Diversity in plants Presentation Transcript

    • WHAT IS DIVERSITY ? Diversity is a commitment to recognizing and appreciating thevariety of characteristics that make individuals unique in an atmosphere that promotes andcelebrates individual and collective achievement. NEXT
    • PLANTAEThe first level of classification among plants depends on whether the plant body has well- differentiated, distinct components. The next level of classification is based on whether the differentiated plant body ha special tissues for the transport of water and other substance within. Further classification looks at the ability to bear seeds and whether the seeds are enclosed within fruits. NEXT
    • THALLOPHYTAA phylum of plants of very diverse habit and structure, including the algae, fungi, and lichens. The simpler forms, as many blue-green algae, yeasts, etc., are unicellular and reproduce vegetatively or by means of asexual spores; in the higher forms the plant body is a thallus, which may be filamentous or may consist of plates of cells; it is commonly undifferentiated into stem, leaves, and roots, and shows no distinct tissue systems; the fronds of many algae, however, are modified to serve many of the functions of the above-named organs. Both asexual and sexual reproduction, often of a complex type, occur in these forms. The Thallophyta exist almost exclusively as gametophytes, the sporophyte being absent or rudimentary. By those who do not separate the Myxophyta from the Tallophyta as a distinct phylum the latter is treated as the lowermost group in the vegetable kingdom. NEXT
    • EXAMPLES OF TYALLOPHYTA – ALGAE ULVA SPIROGYRA CHARA NEXT CLADOPHORA ULOTHRIX
    • BRYOPHYTAA member of a large group of seedless green plants including the mosses, liverworts, and hornworts. Bryophytes lack the specialized tissues xylem and phloem that circulate water and dissolved nutrients in the vascular plants. Bryophytes generally live onland but are mostly found in moist environments, for they have free-swimming sperm that require water for transport. In contrast to the vascular plants, the gametophyte (haploid) generation of bryophytes constitutes the larger plant form, while the small sporophyte (diploid) generation grows on or within the gametophyte and depends upon it for nutrition. NEXT
    • EXAMPLES OF BRYOPHYTARICCIA MARCHANTIA FUNARIA NEXT
    • PTERIDOPHYTAA large group of higher plants to which are sometimes assigned all higher seedless plants except mosses(Bryophyta). Unlike the bryophytes, the sporophyte—the asexual generation—is well developed and divided, except in Psilotophyta, into stems, leaves, and roots.Spores develop, from which emerges the gametophyte— the sexual generation. The gametophyte is poorly developed, almost undifferentiated, and bears sexual organs (in males, antheridia, and in females, archegonia). After fertilization, another asexual generation develops. NEXT
    • EXAMLES OF PTERIDOPHYTA FERNS MARSILEA NEXT
    • GYMNOSPERMS Gymnosperms are a group of vascular plants whose seeds are not enclosed by a ripened (fruit). Gymnosperms are distinguished from the other major group of seed plants, the angiosperms, whose seeds are surrounded by an ovary wall. The seeds of many Gymnosperms (literally, naked seed) are borne in cones and are not visible. Taxonomists now recognize four distinct divisions of extantgymnospermous plants (coniferophyta, cycadophyta, ginkgophyta, and gnetophyta). NEXT
    • EXAMPLES OF GYMNOSPERMS CYCUS PINUS NEXT
    • ANGIOSPERMSAny of a large group of plants that produce flowers.They develop seeds from ovules contained in ovaries, and the seeds are enclosed by fruits which develop from carpels. They are also distinguished by the process of double fertilization. The majority of angiosperms belong to two large classes : monocotyledons and eudicotyledons. Theangiosperms are the largest phylum of living plants, existing in some 235,000 species. They range fromsmall floating plants only one millimeter (0.04 inch) in length to towering trees that are over 100 meters (328 ft) tall. NEXT
    • EXAMPLES OF ANGIOSPERMSMONOCOTS - PAPHIOPEDILUM DICOTS - IPOMOEA END