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Overview Of SPNHF Bio Timber Inventory
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Overview Of SPNHF Bio Timber Inventory

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    Overview Of SPNHF Bio Timber Inventory Overview Of SPNHF Bio Timber Inventory Presentation Transcript

    • The Bio-Timber Inventory (BTI) Past, Present and Future Society for the Protection of NH Forests Land Management Committee March 19, 2008 Peter Woods Ellis Wendy Weisiger Geoff Jones
      • Goals
      • History
      • Process
      • Maps and Reports
      • Timber Harvest Planning
    • Fee-owned Properties 156 Reservations 42,500 Acres
    • In order to manage intelligently and responsibly… we need data .
    • How to collect, store, and display data? BTI
    • 10 Goals of the BTI
      • Facilitate and expedite the production of high-quality management plans
      • Inform long-term timber harvest planning
      • Comply with FSC Standards
      • Store and organize all timber and ecological data in one convenient database
      • Integrate scientifically valid important biological information into forest management
      • Facilitate the production of data-rich maps for ongoing management decisions and long-range management planning
      • Serve as model for Sustainable Forest Management to timberland owners in NH
      • Monitor long-term effects of management activities on land base
      • Provide systematic way for land management staff to familiarize themselves with land base
      • Collect and organize data to allow for access to developing carbon markets
      Stumpage Income Projected vs. Actual (net) FY00 to FY07
    • History of the BTI
    • 1994-1996
      • BTI began as a Research and Development project in response to the Northern Forest Lands Council’s initiative to promote more ecosystem-based forestry
      • designed to respond directly to FSC Standards
      • BTI software components designed and programmed:
        • Sylvester
        • Sylvia
    • 1996-2003 Staff BTI Team: Lionel Chute Andrea Alderman Geoff Jones Steve Perron
      • Conducted BTI on 49 properties totaling 13,500 acres
      • Completed 14 Management Plans
      • Manual written for BTI field methods and software
      • Attempted to market BTI to other “Beta Tester” forest management organizations
      • (By 2005 no beta-testers were using the BTI software)
      • Sylvester and Sylvia Software became more and more outdated
      • Original rigor of BTI field methods eventually eroded
      Help from Professionals: Tom Hahn Ken Desmarais Mark Ducey Bill Leak Mariko Yamasaki Dan Sperduto
      • Conducted BTI on 31 properties totaling over 9,500 acres
      • Completed 5 management plans
      • Convened BTI Review Team to find software to replace Sylvester
      • Assisi chosen and purchased
      • New field methods developed, tested, and implemented for DWD, Natural Communities, and Vegetation
      • Data migrated from Sylvester to Assisi
      • Data migrated from Sylvia (ArcView 3.3 dependant) to map templates in ArcGIS 9.2
      • Management plan template streamlined and consolidated
      • New software and hardware purchased and customized for digital field data collection
      • New set of reports rebuilt from scratch
      2004-2007 Staff BTI Team: Peter Ellis Wendy Weisiger Allan Krygeris BTI Review Team: Mark Ducey Jack Waldron Allan Krygeris Geoff Jones Steve Perron
    • Before
      • Static
      • Database architecture complex and unorganized
      • Data processing tedious and error ridden
      • GIS data organized at property level
      • All-in-one software package
      • 60 reports, 21 maps
      • Field data collection technology out-dated
      • Adaptable
      • Database architecture elegant and intuitive
      • Data-processing quick and simple
      • GIS data organized at ownership level
      • Software components updateable, modular
      • 16 reports, 9 maps
      • Field data collection technology advanced
      After
    • BTI Process
    • Robie Forest
    •  
    • 1. Plan inventory priorities for upcoming year 2007 98 3,532 13 Total: 2007 8 293 Indian Arrowhead Forest Preserve 81 2007 5 177 Rocks, The 24 2007 2 58 Monadnock Reservation 2 2007 29 1,055 High Watch Preserve (and Harmon Preserve) 100 2007 12 420 Robie Forest 139 2007 3 98 Nottingham 143 2007 2 65 Smith Woodland, Sidney Butler 32 2007 6 213 Nemiah Forest 63 2007 5 168 Langenau Forest 56 2007 18 659 Cockermouth Forest 74 2007 1 26 Dickinson Memorial Forest 14 2007 2 71 Stephens Forest 94 2007 6 229 Dana Forest 141 Year Planned Man-Days Acres to Inventory Property Name Block
    • 2. Lay out inventory sampling grid 3. Print field map
    • 4. Conduct Inventory
    •  
    • 23.5 ft radius, 1/38 acre: Vegetation (largest) 11.8 ft radius, 1/100 acre: Vegetation and Regeneration Plot 5.9 ft radius, 1/400 acre: Vegetation (smallest) 59.4 ft radius, approx ¼ acre: DWD SPNHF Bio-Timber Inventory Plot Diagram Variable radius prism plot Trees
    •  
    • 5. Download data 6. Delineate stands Stand 2 H3B Stand 1 HS4B
    • 7. Process Data
    • 8. Generate Reports
      • Stands
      • Inventory
      • Location
      • Cultural Features
      • Hydrologic Features
      • Topography
      • Infrastructure
      • Natural Communities
      • Soils IFS Groups
      • Soils
      • Observations
      • Harvest Maps
      8. Generate Maps
    • 1. Goals and Objectives 1.1 Organization's Land Management Philosophy 1.2 Property Goals and Objectives 1.3 Inventory Methodology 1.4 Map: Inventory 2. Property Data 2.1 Location 2.1.1 Directions to the Property 2.1.2 Map: Location 2.4 Bounds 2.4.2 Table: Boundary Status 2.4.3 Table: Blaze Status 2.5 Access 2.5.2 Table: Property Signs 2.5.4 Table: Gates 2.5.5 Internal Roads and Trails 2.9 Stands 2.9.5 Table: Operability Types 2.9.8 Map: Stands 3. Historical Information 3.2 Land History 3.2.2 Table: Timber Harvesting History — Property Summary 3.2.3 Table: Timber Harvesting History — Volumes and Values 3.2.7 Map: Cultural Features 4. Ecological Information 4.1 Soils 4.1.1 Soils 4.1.2 Table: Soils 4.1.3 Site Indices 4.1.4 Table: Soil Site Indices 4.1.5 Map: Soils 4.1.6 Map: Soils IFS Group 4.1.7 Parent Material and Bedrock Geology 4.2 Hydrology 4.2.6 Map: Hydrological Features 4.3 Topography 4.3.1 Topographic Description 4.3.2 Map: Topography 4.4 Plant Life 4.4.3 Natural Communities 4.4.6 Known Rare, Endangered or Uncommon Plant Species and Their Intended Management 4.4.9 Forest Areas Exhibiting Old Growth Characteristics 4.4.10 Invasive Exotic Plants and Their Intended Management 4.4.11 Table: Invasive Exotic Plant Species 4.5 Wildlife 4.5.2 Table: Wildlife Habitats 4.5.3 Known Resident Species 4.5.7 Graph: Species Composition 4.5.11 Table: Cavity Opportunities for Wildlife: Damaged Live Trees 4.5.12 Table: Cavity Opportunities for Wildlife: Snag Trees 4.5.13 Table: Downed Logs 4.5.14 Graph: FSSWT Recommendations for Dead Wood 5. Timber Resources 5.1 Timber Cruise Methodology 5.2 Operability Assessment 5.3 Property-wide Volumes and Values 5.3.1 Table: Property Volumes and Values 5.3.2 Table: Property Cut and Leave Volumes and Values 5.4 Stand Descriptions and Prescriptions 5.4.1 Stand Narrative Descriptions and Prescriptions 5.4.2 Table: Stand Summary 5.4.3 Table: Stand Volumes and Values 5.4.4 Table: Stand Cut and Leave Volumes and Values 5.4.5 Table: Regeneration 5.4.7 Table: Diameter Distribution of All Live Trees (in TPA by MU) 5.4.10 Table: Product Class/Basal Area Diameter Distribution 5.4.12 Graph: Existing Acceptable vs. Unacceptable Growing Stock 6. Planned Management Activities 6.1 Pre-Harvest Plan 6.2 Map: Pre-Harvest Map Appendix A: Plant Species Identified On Property Appendix B: Harvest Map, Pre-Plan, and Summary 9. Write Management Plan
    • Timber Harvest Planning
    • Available Timber Report A Planning Tool
      • Dynamic Report that is updated with new inventory data and harvested stands
      • Based on a Cut Tally during inventory
      • >1500 BF/Acre Sawlog Cut Volume
      • Can also run at lower cut volumes:
        • 1000-1500 BF/Acre
        • 500-1000 BF/Acre
      • Two Report Levels: Property (Executive Summary) or Stand (Detailed)
    •  
    •  
      • Robie Forest - Stand 2
      • Hemlock 20 MBF+/-
      • WP – 440 MBF+/-
      • Go out and take a closer look
      • Slated for Harvest ~2008 or 2009
    • Pre-Harvest Plans
    • SPNHF Land Management Goals and Objectives
      • To permanently protect and manage the Society’s forest reservations as open space.
      • To seek and protect lands that enlarge and enhance our existing land base.
      • To demonstrate the practice of ecologically and economically sustainable forestry.
      • To actively test, implement, and evaluate state-of-the-art land and resource management techniques.
      • To generate revenue through the management of our lands for the highest-value growth of wood and other forest products and uses where consistent with other conservation values.
      • To protect and manage important and unique natural areas, significant heritage resources, rare, threatened and endangered species, critical wildlife habitat and biological diversity.
      • To provide public access for various forms of recreational, educational, and scientific use where appropriate.
      • To continue to inform landowners, government officials, and the public at large, through active demonstration and education about the importance of a healthy, vibrant, and biologically diverse forest resource in the state.
      • To generate revenue through the management of our lands for the highest-value growth of wood and other forest products and uses where consistent with other conservation values.
      • To permanently protect and manage the Society’s forest reservations as open space.
      • To seek and protect lands that enlarge and enhance our existing land base.
      • To demonstrate the practice of ecologically and economically sustainable forestry.
      • To actively test, implement, and evaluate state-of-the-art land and resource management techniques.
      • To protect and manage important and unique natural areas, significant heritage resources, rare, threatened and endangered species, critical wildlife habitat and biological diversity.
      • To provide public access for various forms of recreational, educational, and scientific use where appropriate.
      • To continue to inform landowners, government officials, and the public at large, through active demonstration and education about the importance of a healthy, vibrant, and biologically diverse forest resource in the state.1
    • Properties that Qualify in the Available Timber Report $540,000 4.6 1,447 Subtotal $260,000 2.0 646 4 Slated for Harvests $800,000 6.6 2,093 Subtotal $200,000 1.8 552 6 Recently Harvested $1,000,000 8.4 2,645 28 Qualify ApproximateTotal Value $ Total Volume MMBF Acres # Properties
    • ATD Reports On
    • Timber Summary Reports
      • Harvest Summary
        • Operation Specific “Housekeeping” Info
          • Harvest Acres, Logger, Equipment, etc.
        • Total Stumpage, Volumes, & Costs
      • Stumpage Summary
        • Harvest Summaries by Species/Grade
        • Harvest Operational Costs Summary
        • Reported on by any timeframe, manager, region, operator, etc.
      • * These reports are in progress
    •  
    • 1980 Inventory: 3-five Year cutting periods 25,000 acres flown; Developed BTI Staff Changes Stumpage predicted by BTI Data
    •  
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    • Annual Growth
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    • Electricity $100 PSNH 1235 03/10/08 Groceries $100 Shaws 1234 03/8/08 Rec Tax Description Amount Payee Check No. Date
    •  
    • BTI/Assisi Inventory Harvest Activity Boundary/Surveying GIS ACTIVITY FRAME Field data collection Data importing Data analysis Reporting Spatial data capture GPS Editing Maps Harvest Plans Contracting Harvest Accounting Depletion and taxes Financial Report Abutters Line maintenance plan ROW documents
    • BTI/Assisi Inventory Harvest Accounting GIS Boundary/Surveying DATA FRAME Action Plans Infrastructure Contracts/Leases
    • BTI/Assisi Inventory
    • GIS
      • Coordination
      • Efficiency
      • Integrity
      • Accessibility
      • Ease of use
      • Extensibility/Flexibility/Adaptability
      The Goal
      • Staff interviews to determine activities and data flows
      • Review and documentation of existing data storage mechanisms
      The Process
      • Strategic-level model: general mapping of activities, events, data flows
      • Operational analysis: refinements to strategic model that incorporates existing entities, desired functionality
      • Detailed data analysis (data model, entity descriptions, relationships)
      • Implementation Plan
      The Product
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