http://www.flickr.com/photos/49503                                                                                        ...
Workshop outlinentroduction and icebreakereview and discussion of general feedbackadvice                                  ...
http://www.flickr.com/photos/wonderlane/375318 Session AimsIn this session, participants will …                           ...
Feedback - icebreakerlease think about instances in which youreceive feedback.• Jot down up to 3 characteristics of the fe...
http://www.flickr.com/photos/wwworks/2General advice for givingfeedback to students                  (drawing on Juwah,et ...
General advice for giving feedback to         students (drawing on Juwah, et al. 2004)  deally, good feedback …  acilitate...
Feedback pattern to engage students                                  Duhs, R. (2011)1. Student does work and comments on i...
Feedback pattern to engage students                  Draft and redraft       ecommended pattern:                  Self Ass...
‘One potentially constraining factor is thatfeedback may mark the end of a transactionrather than a step in an ongoing pro...
General advice for giving feedback to     students (drawing on Juwah, et al. 2004). Helps clarify what good performance is...
General advice for giving feedback to        students (drawing on Juwah, et al. 2004)      . Encourages positive motivatio...
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mollyaliDiscussion points                                                                    ...
Activity 1: Feedback principles and                disciplineslease use the grid (handout 1) to considerthese principles i...
Discussion                                                            hat does the introduction of disciplinarity as a    ...
Feedback as part of disciplinary practice            for academics                                       http://www.flickr...
Some examples of instances in which       academics receive feedbackJournal article reviewers   Writing with co-authors   ...
Discussion point Being a writer and recipient of feedback inyour subject …When and how do you receive orgive feedback on r...
Activity 2: Disciplinary feedback practices –                 peer review   Please take the feedback and guidelines that y...
Activity 2 - Discussion Having worked through the questions on theprevious slide, please discuss your findings inmixed dis...
Implications for feedback to students? ow much of the reviewing experience can be transferred to giving feedback to studen...
Activity 3: Disciplinary aims and feedbacklease look at the benchmarking statement for your discipline:http://www.qaa.ac.u...
Activity 4: Revising your feedback practice ow could you develop your approach to feedback in order to make it more releva...
Conclusions  • Feedback is part of the discipline and, as such, is shaped by   subject conventions.  • Feedback can help s...
Referencesarnell, E.; MacDonald, J.; McCallum, B.; and Scott, M. (2008) Passion andPolitics: Academics reflect on writing ...
Learning Resource MetadataField/Element       Value:Title               Disciplinary Thinking – Feedback: presentation    ...
Considering feedback through a disciplinary lens -  Exploring feedback practices and priorities in different academic fields
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Considering feedback through a disciplinary lens - Exploring feedback practices and priorities in different academic fields

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Disciplinary Thinking - Feedback: Presentation slides for a workshop on taking a disciplinary approach to developing feedback practices in HE.
Taken from the Feedback Theme OER at: http://disciplinarythinking.wordpress.com

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  • Note to workshop leader – this exercise is to get people talking about feedback, but from the point of view of receiving it within their professional lives. Hopefully, feedback will be seen as something that is ongoing in academic disciplines and we can start to make the connection between academics’ experience of feedback professionally (eg feedback on written texts, grant proposals, course outlines) and feedback that is written for students. Throughout this session we will move between the two areas of feedback. Following the discussion, the workshop leader could take a range of ideas generated in the small groups and comment on some of them.
  • This feedback pattern offers multiple opportunities for learning and gets students to engage with work early on in advance of deadlines. The virtual learning environment can be used for feedback on early drafts. Students can be put into small feedback groups, as diverse as possible. They benefit greatly from collaborative learning.
  • According to Ros Duhs, this graphic illustrates multiple iterations of feedback and reflection on feedback. The most important arrow is probably the thick one on the left which goes from the student to the student and underlines the centrality of considering feedback and making an effort to learn from it.
  • Guidance to workshop leader: Participants should be asked in advance to find the relevant feedback – that they have received as part of their publishing practice and perhaps that they have given. Additionally, it is useful if they could bring with them guidance to reviewers and contributors to disciplinary publications or conferences. For participants who don’t regularly publish or review, they could focus on the guidance material. This also offers a point of intersection between teaching and research.
  • Considering feedback through a disciplinary lens - Exploring feedback practices and priorities in different academic fields

    1. 1. http://www.flickr.com/photos/49503 http://www.flickr.com/photos/drift-words/76209257/ 858837Photo: Bark CC BY 2.0 Photo: Dilo CC BY-NC-SA 2.0Considering feedback through a disciplinary lens Exploring feedback practices and priorities in different academic fields
    2. 2. Workshop outlinentroduction and icebreakereview and discussion of general feedbackadvice http://www.flickr.com/photos/steveberardi/3105721570/onsideration of disciplinary practices• Peer review practices (feedback for academics)• Departmental practices (feedback for students)eedback as part of disciplinary practice Photo: Steve Berardi. CC BY-SA
    3. 3. http://www.flickr.com/photos/wonderlane/375318 Session AimsIn this session, participants will … 6/ Photo: Wonderlane CC BYeview and critique general advice on giving feedback to studentsdentify feedback practices within participants’ disciplines (including thosein operation for academics as well as students)engage critically with current disciplinary feedback practices and priorities • Do current practices map on to subject benchmark statements? • What subject priorities are being communicated through feedback?xamine and compare (from a disciplinary perspective) participants’current feedback approaches
    4. 4. Feedback - icebreakerlease think about instances in which youreceive feedback.• Jot down up to 3 characteristics of the feedback that you find most useful.• Discuss these with two others. http://www.flickr.com/photos/wwworks/322 6981951/ Photo: woodleywonderworks CC BY 2.0
    5. 5. http://www.flickr.com/photos/wwworks/2General advice for givingfeedback to students (drawing on Juwah,et al. 2004) Image: Photo: woodleywonderworks. CC BY-NC 2.0 deally, good feedback … . facilitates the development of self assessment (reflection) in learning. . encourages teacher and peer dialogue around learning. . helps clarify what good performance is (goals, criteria, expected standards). . provides opportunities to close the gap between current and desired performance. . delivers high quality information to students about their learning.
    6. 6. General advice for giving feedback to students (drawing on Juwah, et al. 2004) deally, good feedback … acilitates the development of self assessment (reflection) in learning. http://www.flickr.com/photos/21384462@N00/203 • Students should see their own assessment of their work as an integral part of the feedback process. Feedback is2. Encourages something ‘done’ to students. not just teacher and peer dialogue around learning. • Feedback should be an ongoing dialogue, looking 9548271 forward as well as back. Photo: Fish2000 CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
    7. 7. Feedback pattern to engage students Duhs, R. (2011)1. Student does work and comments on it.2. Student submits draft and/or works on draft with peer review and tutor check.3. Student improves work.4. Student submits work to tutor for marking and feedback.5. Student studies feedback.6. Student plans follow-up action. Rosalind Duhs 2011 cc-by-nc-sa
    8. 8. Feedback pattern to engage students Draft and redraft ecommended pattern: Self Assessment tudent  Peer Assessment tudent/peers/tutor  Tutor Assessment tudent  Feedback action plan utor  Rosalind Duhs 2011 cc-by-nc-sa
    9. 9. ‘One potentially constraining factor is thatfeedback may mark the end of a transactionrather than a step in an ongoing process ofdevelopment. The feedback can convey to astudent what has been done well and what couldbe improved, but if the assignment came towardsthe end of a course (as it frequently does), theremay be no direct or imminent opportunity to tryto put the resulting feedback to good use.’ (Hounsell, et al., 2008 cited in Strategies toimprove feedback).
    10. 10. General advice for giving feedback to students (drawing on Juwah, et al. 2004). Helps clarify what good performance is (goals, criteria,expected standards). • Hounsell (1997 cited in Juwah, et al 2004) and others have shown that students and lecturers frequently do not have a shared understanding of what constitutes a successful piece of assessed writing.. Provides opportunities to close the gap between currentand desired performance. • Ideally, feedback should help students get closer to the desired standard for the task. Juwah, et al, observe that more opportunities for students to act on feedback should be made available.. Delivers high quality information to students about theirlearning. • Timely feedback is of most use to students. Research suggests that feedback should be relevant to the task and stated criteria, and not so lengthy that it is overwhelming to the student.
    11. 11. General advice for giving feedback to students (drawing on Juwah, et al. 2004) . Encourages positive motivational beliefs and self-esteem. Students see good feedback as motivational. (NUS report, 2008) . Provides information to teachers that can be used to help shape the teaching. One of the potential advantages of using feedback dialogues is that the Photo: kpwerker CC BY-SA 2.0 teacher gains more insight into student perspectives and performance. (Hughes, et al. 2011)http://www.flickr.com/photos/64693558@N00/2635694952
    12. 12. http://www.flickr.com/photos/mollyaliDiscussion points /408096694/ Photo: Molly Ali. CC BY-NC 2.0 What other broad principles would participants wish to add to the SENLEF list? Thinking as a subject specialist, what are your priorities for feedback?
    13. 13. Activity 1: Feedback principles and disciplineslease use the grid (handout 1) to considerthese principles in light of feedback practicesin your discipline.lease take up to 10 minutes to work throughthe grid, either individually or in pairs.
    14. 14. Discussion hat does the introduction of disciplinarity as a http://www.freephotogaleries.com/picture/Syringe_with_vi lens offer to the discussion of feedbackhttp://www.flickr.com/photos/32104790@N02/5163933978 principles? als/category/4-science Photo: Andrei Ceru. CC v. 3.0 Photo: University of Salford CC BY 2.0 Photo: Nic McPhee CC BY-SA 2.0 http://www.flickr.com/photos/26406 919@N00/313121704
    15. 15. Feedback as part of disciplinary practice for academics http://www.flickr.com/photos/techcocktail/6152321042/ Photo: Jimmy Gardner CC BY-SA 2.0
    16. 16. Some examples of instances in which academics receive feedbackJournal article reviewers Writing with co-authors Conference submissions/presentationsBook editors Course teams/committees Submissions to professional bodiesAppraisal/promotion cases Online writing (eg blogs) Grant proposals/reports
    17. 17. Discussion point Being a writer and recipient of feedback inyour subject …When and how do you receive orgive feedback on research?What are the practices andpriorities in your field? (Do youtend to get written feedback,spoken feedback? Is itconstructive? Are thereopportunities for informalfeedback?)
    18. 18. Activity 2: Disciplinary feedback practices – peer review Please take the feedback and guidelines that you have brought with you and consider the following: hat is being valued here? (for example, results, writing style, research methodology, reference to the existing literature?) How is the feedback communicated? How much developmental feedback is offered?
    19. 19. Activity 2 - Discussion Having worked through the questions on theprevious slide, please discuss your findings inmixed disciplinary groups.re there commonalities across disciplines?hat features of the feedback are specific to
    20. 20. Implications for feedback to students? ow much of the reviewing experience can be transferred to giving feedback to students in your field? o you ever show students the types of http://www.flickr.com/photos/32332324@N00/4346137788 feedback you receive as a writer in your subject? Photo: Chris Valentine CC BY-NC 2.0
    21. 21. Activity 3: Disciplinary aims and feedbacklease look at the benchmarking statement for your discipline:http://www.qaa.ac.uk/AssuringStandardsAndQuality/subject-guidance/Pages/Honours-degree-benchmark-statements.aspxsing the relevant section of the statement (eg ‘teaching,learning and assessment’ or ‘graduate attributes’ or similar),please consider the extent to which certain types of orapproaches to feedback might help students develop theattributes or skills identified here.
    22. 22. Activity 4: Revising your feedback practice ow could you develop your approach to feedback in order to make it more relevant to student learning in your discipline? lease review either a specific assessment item on your course or your feedback practices more generally and consider ways in which you might extend or change the approach to feedback that you are using.
    23. 23. Conclusions • Feedback is part of the discipline and, as such, is shaped by subject conventions. • Feedback can help students enter disciplinary conversations. • Dialogic feedback and ‘feedforward’ help students see feedback as part of a process of learning the subject http://www.flickr.com/photos/8542711@N08/4337 619777Photo: Rosipaw CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
    24. 24. Referencesarnell, E.; MacDonald, J.; McCallum, B.; and Scott, M. (2008) Passion andPolitics: Academics reflect on writing for publication. London: IOE.uhs, R. (2011) ‘Assessment and feedback to students: assessment shapeslearning’ http://www.ucl.ac.uk/calt/cpd4he/resources/assessmentounsell, D., McCune, V., Hounsell, J. and Litjens, J. (2008) The quality ofguidance and feedback to students. Higher Education Research &Development, 27.1, pp. 55-67.uwah, C.; Macfarlane-Dick, D.; Matthew, B.; Nicol, D.; Ross, D.; and Smith,B. (2004) ‘Enhancing student learning through effective formativefeedback’ HEA publication.http://www.heacademy.ac.uk/assets/documents/resources/resourcedatabase/id353_senlef_guide.pdfUS Student Experience Report (2008) http://www.nus.org.uk/PageFiles/350/NUS_StudentExperienceReport.pdf
    25. 25. Learning Resource MetadataField/Element Value:Title Disciplinary Thinking – Feedback: presentation Presentation slides for a workshop on taking a disciplinary approach to developingDescription feedback practices in HE.Theme FeedbackSubject HE - EducationAuthor Colleen McKenna & Jane Hughes: HEDERA, 2012Owner The University of BathAudience Educational developers in accredited programmes & courses in higher education.Issue Date 24/05/2012Last updated Date 04/08/2012Version FinalPSF Mapping A3, K5License Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 UK: England & Wales License. ukoer, education, discthink, disciplinary thinking, hedera, university of bath,Keywords feedback, assessment

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