So what is Creative Commons?  Its something to do with Copyright right? Do I care... Surely I wouldn’t get caught! http://...
So what are the rules for us in education in NZ? There are no general exemptions from copyright law for education purposes...
So where does that leave us when using creative works of others? At Tiniroto the students co-constructed a basic set of ru...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=io3BrAQl3so Pretty restricting isn’t it? Creative Commons allows us to use, alter and be cr...
http://www.copyright.org.nz/index.php http://mirrors.creativecommons.org/getcreative/ http://ictucan.wikispaces.com/ This ...
http://audacity.sourceforge.net/download/
Nothing worse when you have found the perfect thing but your computer wont read or see it! Download at:  http://switch.en....
Here’s a way to cut pieces out of pictures and superimpose onto other pictures.
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

So what is creative commons

217
-1

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
217
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Kia Ora tatau my name is Di Roadley, I am a part-time teacher doing principal release at Tiniroto School. I am in the Higher Learning ICTPD Cluster. This afternoons session will have a couple of stages firstly well take a brief look at copyright and creative commons, Ill share with you how we have handled those rights at Tiniroto, then we will spend some time exploring different locations to find pictures and sounds that you can use in your own presentations and class learning. Following that we’ll take a look at a couple of my favourite ways of cutting and mixing music, converting the files so other programmes can read them and my new favourite for altering images. Are you happy with that format? We can spend as long as you like on each thing
  • This was a surprise to me as I always understood that as educators we have all sorts of rights to use other peoples work in the name of education, however as you can see there is no general exception, however there is ways around these as long as you are aware. Under current international law the moment you lift your pen or art tool from the paper, or pushed save on your electronic work it is automatically covered by Copyright.
  • At Tiniroto we seem to always be needing images and sounds to support what we are doing. At the moment we are writing narratives and making short visuals to go with them, favourite programmes are PowerPoint because of its ease of use, photo story, MovieMaker and imovie. So we needed some simple guidelines to help us. We looked at the schools copyright contract with the ministry, I showed the students that video you have just seen and they very quickly concluded that there was a responsibility and it was fair enough! We co-constructed this model to guide our use of all sound and images, we also added sounds and image acknowledgement to our reference model. Talk through the four stages.
  • So Creative commons, read slide put simply Copyright means all rights reserved whereas Creative commons means some rights reserved. You may not have complete use of the creator works but they have given you permission to use it. Lets watch this short clip to demonstrate.
  • If you would like to all go here, there is an open wiki we have permission to use, it was initiated by Professor Jane Nichols of Otago university. It has been kept open so that you can add to it should you have sites to recommend to others.
  • There are many ways of cutting, altering and joining sounds and music but this is a great one, its easy to use and you can output in different formats.
  • If you have ever been swapping between programmes, need to create a CD of music for that dance or gymnastic routine you will know the frustration of having the wrong format. Swapping between apple and movie maker had me nearly pulling my hair out, This switch is free and has a wide range of in and outputs all in one step.
  • This has been an invaluable little programme, it is a little bit tricky to start with but the kids pick it up really fast. You can cut out pieces of any picture and attached them to any other picture- which is great fun. The thing I like the best- unlike the apple you can change the picture after you have imported it so that you can adjust the size to match the background. If we have time will look at how you can muck around with clip-art and ungroup bits to suit what you are doing.
  • So what is creative commons

    1. 1. So what is Creative Commons? Its something to do with Copyright right? Do I care... Surely I wouldn’t get caught! http://www.copyright.org.nz/owners.php
    2. 2. So what are the rules for us in education in NZ? There are no general exemptions from copyright law for education purposes. The Copyright Act specifies certain circumstances where all, or a substantial part, of a copyright work may be used for education without copyright owner permission. Certain educational institutions, such as non-profit schools, universities and polytechnics, are allowed to copy from original literary, dramatic, musical or artistic works and published editions for educational purposes as follows: Copyright Council of New Zealand www.copyright.org.nz 2 • One copy of the whole or part of a work may be copied by a teacher for instructional purposes. Only one copy can be made on any one occasion . Such copying is solely to assist the teacher in preparing and giving a lesson. Teachers can not make the copy available for students to copy themselves. • Multiple copies may be made of up to 3% or 3 pages of a work (whichever is greater) as long as no more than 50% of a work is copied (for example, no more than half of a poem, short story or newspaper article may be copied). Artistic works may not be copied under this provision unless they are copied as part of the literary, dramatic or musical work being copied. • No charges c an be made for supplying copies to students. • No copying is allowed from the same work within 14 days.
    3. 3. So where does that leave us when using creative works of others? At Tiniroto the students co-constructed a basic set of rules to help us use the sounds, images and recordings we wanted to. <ul><li>You must have purchased (paid money) for the source, it cant be a borrowed or ‘pirated’ recording </li></ul><ul><li>You must acknowledge the source </li></ul><ul><li>You must ask permission where possible </li></ul><ul><li>Make your own (sounds & images) when possible </li></ul><ul><li>You can’t use it to make money </li></ul>
    4. 4. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=io3BrAQl3so Pretty restricting isn’t it? Creative Commons allows us to use, alter and be creative with others works. This simplicity distinguishes Creative Commons from an all rights reserved copyright. Creative Commons was invented to create a more flexible copyright model, replacing &quot;all rights reserved&quot; with &quot;some rights reserved.&quot;
    5. 5. http://www.copyright.org.nz/index.php http://mirrors.creativecommons.org/getcreative/ http://ictucan.wikispaces.com/ This is a wiki made by Professor Jane Nichols of Otago University. It is an open wiki so you can contribute any favourite sites that you use while making the most of what others have contributed.
    6. 6. http://audacity.sourceforge.net/download/
    7. 7. Nothing worse when you have found the perfect thing but your computer wont read or see it! Download at: http://switch.en.softonic.com/
    8. 8. Here’s a way to cut pieces out of pictures and superimpose onto other pictures.
    1. A particular slide catching your eye?

      Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

    ×