Open Data: Its Value and Lessons Learned

962 views
901 views

Published on

Presentation to Australian Government Open Data group 3 Feb 2014

Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
962
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Open Data: Its Value and Lessons Learned

  1. 1. Open Data: its value and lessons learned Andrew Stott UK Transparency Board formerly Director, data.gov.uk @dirdigeng andrew.stott@dirdigeng.com 03 Feb 2014
  2. 2. Triple Objectives Objectives of Open Data More Transparent Government Improved public services New Economic and Social Value 2
  3. 3. Triple Objectives Objectives of Open Data More Transparent Government Improved public services New Economic and Social Value 3
  4. 4. 4
  5. 5. 5
  6. 6. Open Data as a Transport Investment in London  ~500 Applications (mobile, web, others)  ~5000 people involved in “app industry”  As a transport project alone, evaluated by usual economic criteria: ROI = 58:1  Transport For London have stopped making their own apps 6
  7. 7. Anonymised medical prescription data  Used experts in  Health  Data Analytics  Analysed 35m data records  8 weeks  £200m+/yr savings  Repeatable  Could scale to £1.5bn 7
  8. 8. National Information Infrastructure 8
  9. 9. Denmark: Open Address Data Period Benefits Costs Return on Investment 2004-09 >€60m (including setup) ~€2m 22:1 2010 (steady state) ~€0.2m 70:1 ~€14.0m 9
  10. 10. Commercial Meteorology in the US and Europe in 2004 The size of the US and EU economies are approximately the same United States (1) Europe (2) (open) (closed/charged) $ 400-700 million $ 30-50 million Number of Firms 400 30 Number of Employees 4000 300 $1,929m $144m Gross Receipts Annual Value of Weather Risk Contracts (3) Sources: Weiss 2004, using Commercial Weather Services Association (1), Meteoconsult (2), Weather Risk Management Association (3) 10
  11. 11. UK Weather Public Weather Service now Open Data:  Costs £83m/yr  Total benefits £614m/yr
  12. 12. Cadastral data estate agents/ realtors Financial services builders and other local services 12
  13. 13. 13
  14. 14. $930m business from Open Data  Weather for 1m points  60 years of crop yield data  14 TB of soil data  Company formed in 2006  Sold to Monsanto October 2013 for $930m cash 14
  15. 15. Roadworks Data Councils:  Cost £0.7m a year  Benefits £6.3m a year  Fiscal ROI 9:1 Overall value  Wider benefits of additional £19m a year.  Overall ROI 28:1 15
  16. 16. 16
  17. 17. 17
  18. 18. 18
  19. 19. Evidence base for EU Open Data Directive  Open Gov Data in EU would ‒ increase business activity by up to €40 Bn/yr ‒ have total benefits up to €140 Bn/yr  Open Data was reused 10x-100x more than charged-for data  Lowering charges may attract new types of reusers, in particular SMEs.  Costs appear to increase very little: in fact, they may eventually decrease All economic analysis and case studies point the same way 19
  20. 20. Deloitte POPSIS Case Studies Case Data Type Country Increase BEV Mapping AT Downloads: +200% to +7,000% DECA Addresses DK Uers: +10,000% Destatis Statistics DE Users: +1800% Downloads: +800% IGNCNIG Mapping ES Volume: +200% Users: +200% KNMI Weather NL Users: +1000% Met.No Weather NO Users: +3000% Spanish Cadaster Cadastral ES Downloads: +800% to +1900% 20
  21. 21. Case Study: Statistics Germany 2004 Pay per use 2010 Free of charge 110,000 EUR 0 EUR Premium analyses 78,000 EUR 152,000 EUR Downloads Standard Accounts Premium Accounts 130,300 1,800 1,093,000 3,000 36 69 Online publications Online sales 21
  22. 22. Case Study: Statistics Germany Users: +1800% Downloads: +800% 22
  23. 23. Government can be an Open Data user too Greater Manchester estimated £6.5m savings from finding and using its own data more easily 23
  24. 24. EU Inspire Directive on Geospatial Data One Government reported fiscal ROI 8:1 in first 4 years, plus wider benefits 24
  25. 25. British Columbia Open Data  Government itself is #1 user of its data  33% of downloads come from within BC Government 25
  26. 26. Measuring Benefits is not easy  Benefits take time to emerge  Most benefits are from Open Data plus innovation  Difficult to measure consumer surplus, but that’s where more of the value often is  Difficult to value public sector benefits  Benefits not predictable  “National Information Infrastructure” is a good source of benefits 26
  27. 27. Triple Objectives Objectives of Open Data More Transparent Government Improved public services New Economic and Social Value 27
  28. 28. Performance of individual schools 28
  29. 29. Performance of individual hospitals Patient ratings 12+ Weeks MRSA-free Blood clots 2 recent MRSA Low Mortality Good C-Diff record 29
  30. 30. Performance of local police and courts 30
  31. 31. Open Data used to drive Citizen Engagement Accessible data on crime It’s very local Local team How YOU can get involved Local police Twitter feed Telephone, website, Facebook and Youtube …. Attract Inform Engage Action 31
  32. 32. “ “Police.uk is a success story” “I am constantly afraid of becoming a victim of crime, but this website has made me more relaxed now that I know what has happened and where. Crimes are not quite as rife in my area as I imagined. I also feel that I have some sort of link now with my local police. Well done” “The new 'Draw Your Own Area' function is a vast improvement which will allow regular comparisons to be made about an entire town or village.” Site feedback: 70% of respondents agree website is easy to use whilst 66% agree information is easy to understand “It's just great to have the transparency because it will encourage me and others to report crime because the result of doing so is now visual rather than notional.” “Local information for interest, and details of who my local officers are. It's good to feel involved and informed. I think this will help us all take more responsibility for our own areas” £300,000 set-up, £150,000/year to run Over 56 million visits since January 2011 33% of adults aware of and 11% have used the site 2/3 of users say they’ll return to the site to see if crime goes up and down 2/5 of users say they’re now more likely to take steps to improve their personal 32 safety
  33. 33. Triple Objectives Objectives of Open Data More Transparent Government Improved public services New Economic and Social Value 33
  34. 34. Is My Money Being Spent Well? 34
  35. 35. Organisational Transparency Pay Responsibil Where the person is in the structure Contact details 35
  36. 36. International Corporate Transparency 36
  37. 37. First 4 years of data.gov.uk: Lessons Learned  Over 10,000 datasets  37 GB of geo data  Public Data Principles  Open Government Licence  Transparency of salaries, spending, contracts and tenders  Four site versions, each in response to user feedback 37
  38. 38. Leadership inside and outside the Organisation 38
  39. 39. Demand from business and citizens 39
  40. 40. Clear, common, licensing approach 40
  41. 41. Standards 41
  42. 42. Make sure data is re-usable 42
  43. 43. Ensure Privacy of Personal Data 43
  44. 44. Focus on data on things that people care about 44
  45. 45. It’s not just about new data Scope for “Open Data” also includes data previously “published” but …  in non-reusable format  with restricted licence  only aimed at specialist groups  only for payment  only in response to requests  difficult to find data.gov.uk contains a lot of data which nobody knew was already published 45
  46. 46. Handling the concerns of data owners “People hug their database, they don't want to let it go. You have no idea the number of excuses people come up with to hang onto their data and not give it to you, even though you've paid for it as a taxpayer.” – Tim Berners-Lee http://www.ted.com/talks/tim_berners_lee_on_the_next_web.html 46
  47. 47. Release data people want 47
  48. 48. Manage expectations, prepare for mistakes “We’re making a small start next week. But eventually, it’s going to make a big difference.” “The information we’re publishing next week won’t be perfect, and I’m sure there’ll be some mistakes. But I want to get on with it.” UK Prime Minister 29 May 2010 48
  49. 49. Delivery Incrementally 49
  50. 50. Identify datasets not yet released 50
  51. 51. Ensure continuing conformance 51
  52. 52. Not all Government data is accurate 52
  53. 53. Data Quality  Release of data will reveal issues of data quality  Surprisingly little criticism  Celebrate greater checking of data!  Use as stimulus to  Measure  Prioritise  Improve 53
  54. 54. Promote Use of Data 54
  55. 55. Continuously engage with developers Photos: @memespring, @MadLabUK, @paul_clarke 55
  56. 56. Open Data Ecosystem 56
  57. 57. UK Open Data Institute  Develop capability of UK businesses to exploit value of Open Data  Engage developers/small businesses to build Open Data supply chains and commercial outlets  Help public sector use its own data more effectively  Ensure academic research in Open Data technologies 57
  58. 58. UK Open Data Institute  Running ~12 months  £200m/yr savings identified  5 startups incubated, 6 courses launched, 4 hackathons  27 private-sector company paying members  Over £2m of private sector funding secured in 6 mths  1,500 visitors to London space – and provides “neutral meeting space” for government and entrepreneurs 58
  59. 59. … and the biggest lesson of all Overcome obstacles practically by doing, not debating 59
  60. 60. Discussion? 60
  61. 61. End 61
  62. 62. 62

×