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The trust and the brazil turkey – iran

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  • 1. The TRUST andtheBrazil- Turkey – Iran agreement
    Madeby Diogo Grandini
  • 2. A nuclear weapon is an explosive device that derives its destructive force from nuclear reactions, either fission or a combination of fission and fusion. Both reactions release vast quantities of energy from relatively small amounts of matter; a modern thermonuclear weapon weighing little more than a thousand kilograms can produce an explosion comparable to the detonation of more than a billion kilograms of conventional high explosive.
    Thus, even single small nuclear devices no larger than traditional bombs can devastate an entire city by blast, fire and radiation. Nuclear weapons are considered weapons of mass destruction, and their use and control has been a major focus of international relations policy since their debut.
    The Nuclear Weapon
  • 3. In the history of warfare, only two nuclear weapons have been detonated offensively, both near the end of World War II. The first was detonated on the morning of 6 August 1945, when the US dropped a uranium gun-type device code-named “Little Boy” on the Japanese city of Hiroshima. The second was detonated three days later when the United States dropped a plutonium implosion-type device code-named “Fat Man" on the city of Nagasaki, Japan. These bombings resulted in the immediate deaths of an estimated 80,000 people (mostly civilians) from injuries sustained from the explosion. When factoring in deaths from long-term effects of ionizing radiation and acute radiation sickness, the total death toll is estimated at 120,000. The use of these weapons remains controversial.
    TheHistoryof Nuclear Weapon
  • 4. Turkey and Brazil, both non-permanent members of the U.N. Security Council, have offered to mediate one of the most complicated conflicts that we have been living nowadays their promises is to find a resolution to the impasse at a time when world powers are in talks to impose a fourth round of U.N. sanctions on Iran. The agreement among those countries has looked a guarantee of security and peace.
  • 5. SecurityCouncilPermanentMembers
    The security Council Permanent Members are all nuclear weapons possessors. They all see this agreement with distrust , they say that the Iranian regime didn't accomplish last agreement signed by its governments. Accusing that the Iran Government it is only interested in gaining time to build a Nuclear Bomb. The superiority of those countries is reinforced if those agreement does not work, reaffirming the power and the influence of the Five Permanent Members.
  • 6. The nuclear program of Iran was launched in the 1950s
    with the help of the United States as part of the Atoms for peace  program. The support, encouragement and
    participation of the United States and Western European
    governments in Iran's nuclear program continued until the 1979 Iranian Revolution that toppled the Shah of Iran.
    After the 1979 revolution, the Iranian Government  temporarily disbanded elements of the program, and then revived it with less Western assistance than during the pre-revolution era. Iran's nuclear program has included several research sites, two uranium mines, a research reactor, and uranium processing facilities that include three known uraninum enrichment plants.
    The long delayed startup of Iran's first nuclear power plant, Bushehr I, was most recently estimated for the middle of 2010. There are no current plans to complete the Bushehr II reactor, although the construction of 19 nuclear power plants is envisaged.Iranhas announced that it is working on a new 360 MWe nuclear power plant to be located in Darlhovin. Iran has also indicated that it will seek more medium-sized nuclear power plants and uranium mines for the future.
    Why Iran?
  • 7. trust verb (BELIEVE) 
     to have belief or confidence in the honesty, goodness, skill or safety of a person, organization or thing
    Trust