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Scrum vs Kanban
 

Scrum vs Kanban

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The presentation below is the small deck I use to introduce Scrumban in one hour. It's a special tool that must be used in the right circumstances. I continue to promote Scrum first for projects ...

The presentation below is the small deck I use to introduce Scrumban in one hour. It's a special tool that must be used in the right circumstances. I continue to promote Scrum first for projects focused on new features to increase customer satisfaction, but when teams enter hardening phases in their product life-cycle or fall in complete maintenance mode, instead of letting Scrum lose it's shine, I prefer to introduce Scrumban.

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  • This is great Dimitri!

    One question, with a team of 9, how might I calculate the WIP limits for the team? One approach is dividing the team number by two and rounding down. Another approach is giving everyone a WIP limit of two, add the WIPs together and subtract one.

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  • Excellent, thanks Dimitri
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  • @harvinsingh There is no velocity since there is no iteration to associate a velocity. The capacity of a team is measured directly on the board by setting WIP limits on the columns. Ultimately in Scrumban we want as a team to focus on similar size stories, but even if the stories are not similar size, over time an average time for a card to get through the board can be calculated. This average time can be used to set the expected time for a card to get Done.
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  • Thanks for the answers.
    In Scrum we derive velocity by the total story points completed by the team in each sprint. How do you derive velocity in Scrumban/ Kanban, or is velocity not measured ?
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  • 1. No, in Scrumban there is no need to do iteration planning. The concept of time-boxing is removed in terms of having iteration cycles. This is a key reason that Agile teams evolve into Kanban, to embrace a continuous flow of work. With that said, the slide in this presentation illustrating release planning does show that although it's a continuous flow, we still conduct the Scrum ceremonies (planning, review, retrospective) at a set frequency by the team.

    2. The lead time can easily continue to be calculated from the time the card (work) hits the Kanban board (To Do column) and completes (Done column). The cycle time is also easily tracked when the card enters the WIP columns on the board. Just adding a couple of dates on the card and tracking it consistently will give you what you need to calculate these 2 metrics.

    Remember that the main distinction in adding Kanban to Scrum is the extreme focus on the Board. Visualizing all the work on the board (the entire process), reaching all the way to also include 'story creation / backlog management' is what is so enticing when considering the evolution to Scrumban.
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    Scrum vs Kanban Scrum vs Kanban Presentation Transcript