surviving an avalanche<br />
 Lean THINKING<br />
“All we are doing is looking at a time line from the moment the customer gives us an order to the point when we collect th...
 WHY I’M TALKING ABOUT IT<br />
 WHY I’M TALKING ABOUT IT<br />
 LEAN: DEFINED<br />
WASTE IS:<br /><ul><li>Anything that does not add value to the final product</li></ul>   or service in the eyes if the cus...
Process Cycle Time<br />Before<br /> Improved Cycle Time<br /><ul><li>Increased Customer Satisfaction
Improved Delivery
Increased Capacity
Increased Quality
Productivity
Increased Employee Satisfaction</li></ul>After<br />Value Add Time <br />(Work)   <br />Non Value Add Time<br />(Waste)<br...
Value Added Activity:<br />Any activity that changes the form, fit or function of a product/transaction<br />Something the...
The practice of making all standards, targets and actual conditions highly visible in the workplace<br />PRIMARY CONCEPTS:...
PRIMARY CONCEPTS: visual management<br />
PRIMARY CONCEPTS: visual management<br />
FIVE TECHNIQUES<br /><ul><li>Observation
 Spaghetti diagram
5S’s (sorting, straightening, systematic cleaning,</li></ul>   standardizing, and sustaining)<br /><ul><li> Value Stream M...
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Lean Process

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  • 93 percent of avalanche victims survive if dug out within 15 minutes. After 45 minutes, only 20 to 30 percent of victims are alive. After two hours, very few people survive.
  • Toyota Production System (originally called &quot;Just In Time Production,”) developed by Toyota, comprises its management philosophy and practices. The TPS organizes manufacturing and logistics for the automobile manufacturer, including interaction with suppliers and customers. The system is a major precursor of the more generic &quot;Lean manufacturing.&quot; Taiichi Ohno, Shigeo Shingo and Eiji Toyoda developed the system between 1948 and 1975.[1]Although inspired by Henry Ford, they were unimpressed while observing the assembly line and mass production that had made Ford rich.
  • Clinton brought this application to our attention a couple months agoCo-founder of AgileZen, Niki Cohari, studied the TPS while working on her Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology and wanted to look beyond manufacturing in applying lean thinking
  • Rachel was a good resource to draw onTons of information availableHealthcare is in desperate need of cost savings through waste elimination and process improvementRachel was excited to help the systemMuch time is spent watching employees do their job to see where waste occurs
  • Many definitions availableUsed by Inova for easier comprehension by large groups
  • Began in manufacturing, where waste can be more obvious (but not necessarily to the employee)Having to walk a long way to complete a taskWe think about these things already, convincing clients that mood boards add valueReduce where possible – e.g.: reports that aren’t reviewed
  • Brian &amp; Andy and the directors work on this all the timeStreamlining and standardizing internal processes Finding new tools to enable standardization (Basecamp, Unfuddle, Harvest)
  • Blog entries add valuePlaying Wii does not for the client, but does for employee moraleFor me, necessary waste seems to be running reports to prepare the clients invoice
  • Kanban(看板?), also spelled kamban and literally meaning &quot;signboard&quot; or &quot;billboard&quot;, is a concept related to lean and just-in-time (JIT) production.According to Taiichi Ohno,kanbanis one means through which JIT is achieved.[1]Blue = oralRed = anal
  • AgileZen draws on an idea from lean manufacturing called kanban — a Japanese word that literally means visual card. In an AgileZen project, work is organized on a kanban board, which has a number of columns that represent the phases that work has to go through in order to be considered complete.
  • Our own Unfuddle uses colors for visual management, but perhaps not as effectively as we’d like
  • Techniques for identifying waste or process trouble spotsExamples of a few
  • The “gemba” is where the work happens and value is addedAt your desk or a client meetingMore easily observed by a third partyIn lean manufacturing, the idea of gemba is that the problems are visible, and the best improvement ideas will come from going to the gemba. The gemba walk, much like MBWA or Management by Walking Around, is an activity that takes management to the front lines to look for waste.
  • From previous pie chart, we see: Value added (needs to be done) Necessary waste Waste (determine where elimination is possible)
  • Rachel will observe people in their work environmentGive each person a colorRecord their actual movements
  • By moving things around and saving steps, they were able to eliminate three positions and save the hospital thousands
  • Taken from DUX Playbook that Tom and UX team put togetherShows how the root cause is found by asking “why” when encountering a problem until the root cause is found
  • Be thinking of ways that you can eliminate waste in your positionViget management already leads the charge when it comes to process improvement, but they are willing to listen to and support ideasIf it makes sense, watch each other to see where waste occurs
  • Lean Process

    1. 1. surviving an avalanche<br />
    2. 2. Lean THINKING<br />
    3. 3. “All we are doing is looking at a time line from the moment the customer gives us an order to the point when we collect the cash. And we are reducing that time line by removing the non-value added wastes.”<br />TaiichiOhno<br /> INTRODUCTION<br />
    4. 4. WHY I’M TALKING ABOUT IT<br />
    5. 5. WHY I’M TALKING ABOUT IT<br />
    6. 6. LEAN: DEFINED<br />
    7. 7. WASTE IS:<br /><ul><li>Anything that does not add value to the final product</li></ul> or service in the eyes if the customer<br /><ul><li>Any activity the customer wouldn't want to pay for if</li></ul> they knew it was happening<br /><ul><li>Any human activity that absorbs resources but</li></ul> creates no value<br />PRIMARY CONCEPTS: waste reduction<br />
    8. 8. Process Cycle Time<br />Before<br /> Improved Cycle Time<br /><ul><li>Increased Customer Satisfaction
    9. 9. Improved Delivery
    10. 10. Increased Capacity
    11. 11. Increased Quality
    12. 12. Productivity
    13. 13. Increased Employee Satisfaction</li></ul>After<br />Value Add Time <br />(Work) <br />Non Value Add Time<br />(Waste)<br />PRIMARY CONCEPTS: waste reduction<br />
    14. 14. Value Added Activity:<br />Any activity that changes the form, fit or function of a product/transaction<br />Something the customer is willing to pay for<br />Non-Value Added Activity:<br />All other activity is WASTE<br />Grow<br />Value<br />Unnecessary Waste<br />Eliminate<br />Necessary Waste<br /> PRIMARY CONCEPTS: adding value<br />Minimize<br />
    15. 15. The practice of making all standards, targets and actual conditions highly visible in the workplace<br />PRIMARY CONCEPTS: visual management<br />
    16. 16. PRIMARY CONCEPTS: visual management<br />
    17. 17. PRIMARY CONCEPTS: visual management<br />
    18. 18. FIVE TECHNIQUES<br /><ul><li>Observation
    19. 19. Spaghetti diagram
    20. 20. 5S’s (sorting, straightening, systematic cleaning,</li></ul> standardizing, and sustaining)<br /><ul><li> Value Stream Mapping
    21. 21. Root Cause Analysis</li></ul> methods & techniques<br />
    22. 22. methods & techniques: the “gemba”<br />
    23. 23. methods & techniques: observation<br />
    24. 24. Analyzers<br />Sample Storage<br />Analyzer<br />Analyzer<br />Analyzer<br />Analyzer<br />Accessioning Desk<br />Pneumatic Tube System<br />(3) Chem Centrifuges<br />Before<br /> methods & techniques: spaghetti diagram<br />
    25. 25. After<br />Analyzer<br />Analyzer<br /> methods & techniques: spaghetti diagram<br />
    26. 26. methods & techniques: root cause analysis<br />
    27. 27. <ul><li>Ideas are driven by those doing the job
    28. 28. Supported by senior leadership
    29. 29. No substitute for the “gemba” </li></ul>LEAN RESOURCES<br />http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lean_manufacturing<br />http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toyota_Production_System<br />http://www.lean.org/<br />http://agilezen.com/<br />AVALANCHE RESOURCES<br />http://www.avalanche.org/<br />http://www.avalanche.ca/<br /> final thoughts & additional resources<br />
    30. 30. questions?<br />

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