Protect
Protect: Outline Do I fully understand the privacy settings on my  social networking sites? Am I ready to take responsib...
Protect: Chris Tindal“Does it count if someone else is cupping my                    chest?”       Image courtesy of Chris...
Protect: Chris Tindal “If someone has demonstrated a pattern of   bad judgment, or done or said something highly objection...
Protect: StrategiesWhat you can do to managewho sees what on socialnetworking sites:• Read up on Facebook’s new  approach ...
Protect: StrategiesWhat you can do to managewho sees what on socialnetworking sites:• Always check for terms of  use and p...
Protect: Glen ClarkImage courtesy             ….Isn’t this an invasion of privacy?of Holster(Flickr)
Protect: Glen Clark                                       Yes, but..                                       Because Clark w...
Protect: Strategies• The general rule of thumb  is that what happens in  public, is public• Your right to an  expectation ...
Protect: Strategies• The internet is public  space• Courts rule in terms  of ‘reasonable  expectation’                    ...
What’s your digital tattoo?
Resources   Tindal, Chris. “My inevitable Facebook scandal.” Chris Tindal. N.p., Web. 12 July 2012/   Private (c) Holste...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Protect

241

Published on

Published in: Technology, News & Politics
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
241
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Chris Tindal, a young professional with (at one time) aspirations for political office, shares his views about belonging to a generation that has grown up on Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, etc.  In his post, My Inevitable Facebook Scandal, he questions whether or not we should allow a person’s “momentary lapses in judgement” to ruin a career or prevent them from reaching a personal goal.  He cites the 2009 Facebook scandal involving aspiring BC politician, Ray Lam, as an example. Yet we know that people are judged by their online presence – regardless of how or by whom that presence is created.
  • Chris Tindal, a young professional with (at one time) aspirations for political office, shares his views about belonging to a generation that has grown up on Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, etc.  In his post, My Inevitable Facebook Scandal, he questions whether or not we should allow a person’s “momentary lapses in judgement” to ruin a career or prevent them from reaching a personal goal.  He cites the 2009 Facebook scandal involving aspiring BC politician, Ray Lam, as an example. Yet we know that people are judged by their online presence – regardless of how or by whom that presence is created.
  • In 1999 police investigated then British Columbia Premier, Glen Clark, on charges of fraud. A television crew on the street outside of Clark’s home took footage through an open window of Clark’s house as it was being tossed by police with Clark in view. Taking images from a public space, (the sidewalk), of a private individual in private space, (Clark’s kitchen), is an invasion of privacy. The use of the footage was controversial. Under normal circumstances this would be a standard invasion of privacy according to the British Columbian Privacy Act. However, as Clark was a public figure, the media organization published the invasive footage believing they could prove it was in the public interest.
  • In 1999 police investigated then British Columbia Premier, Glen Clark, on charges of fraud. A television crew on the street outside of Clark’s home took footage through an open window of Clark’s house as it was being tossed by police with Clark in view. Taking images from a public space, (the sidewalk), of a private individual in private space, (Clark’s kitchen), is an invasion of privacy. The use of the footage was controversial. Under normal circumstances this would be a standard invasion of privacy according to the British Columbian Privacy Act. However, as Clark was a public figure, the media organization published the invasive footage believing they could prove it was in the public interest.
  • In public space you wave your right to an expectation of privacy. You and your subjects are pretty much fair game. News publications are allowed to use images of private citizens in public space without permission. If you sell your images for non-news purposes, you need to ask for permission.
  • When it comes to privacy, courts rule in terms of ‘reasonable expectation.’ This means that if you post pictures of yourself drunk at a party on-line, you cannot claim that a media organization who uses these photos violated your privacy. The internet is public space. When you post online, you wave your right to privacy. Most privacy laws in the democratic world accord that the invasion of privacy can be justified if it is found to be in the interest of the public good.
  • Protect

    1. 1. Protect
    2. 2. Protect: Outline Do I fully understand the privacy settings on my social networking sites? Am I ready to take responsibility for everything I post online – now and into the future? Do I know the difference between public and private space? Is invasion of privacy ever justified? Is the Internet public or private space?
    3. 3. Protect: Chris Tindal“Does it count if someone else is cupping my chest?” Image courtesy of Chris Tindal
    4. 4. Protect: Chris Tindal “If someone has demonstrated a pattern of bad judgment, or done or said something highly objectionable, they should answer for it. But one or two “gotcha” photos? Shouldthat really disqualify one from public service? Ultimately it’s up to voters to decide, but I tend to think not.” - Chris Tindal
    5. 5. Protect: StrategiesWhat you can do to managewho sees what on socialnetworking sites:• Read up on Facebook’s new approach to privacy on ReclaimPrivacy.org• Learn how to manage and alter settings on Facebook’s Guide to Privacy Screencap courtesy of Facebook
    6. 6. Protect: StrategiesWhat you can do to managewho sees what on socialnetworking sites:• Always check for terms of use and privacy guidelines on any site you choose to have an account with. Make sure they work for you Screencap courtesy of Twitter
    7. 7. Protect: Glen ClarkImage courtesy ….Isn’t this an invasion of privacy?of Holster(Flickr)
    8. 8. Protect: Glen Clark Yes, but.. Because Clark was a public figure, the media organization published the invasive footage believing they could prove it was in the public interest.Image courtesy of Kenjonbro (Flickr)
    9. 9. Protect: Strategies• The general rule of thumb is that what happens in public, is public• Your right to an expectation of privacy is waived in a public space Image courtesy of JohannaClear (Flickr)
    10. 10. Protect: Strategies• The internet is public space• Courts rule in terms of ‘reasonable expectation’ Image courtesy of Vectorportal (Flickr)
    11. 11. What’s your digital tattoo?
    12. 12. Resources Tindal, Chris. “My inevitable Facebook scandal.” Chris Tindal. N.p., Web. 12 July 2012/ Private (c) Holster® (http://www.flickr.com/photos/holster/195031415/in/photostream/). CC BY-NC- ND-C 2.0 Photographers Corner (c) Kenjonbro (http://www.flickr.com/photos/kenjonbro/6341049000/in/photostream/). CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 IMG_0102 (c) JohannaClear (http://www.flickr.com/photos/51035524905@N01/7579688702/in/photostream/). CC BY- NC-SA 2.0 Hand Of Justice Vector Art (c) Vectorportal (http://www.flickr.com/photos/vectorportal/5621821439/in/photostream/). CC BY 2.0 tr
    1. A particular slide catching your eye?

      Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

    ×