Highly Visible and Hard to Remove<br />Trish Rosseel<br />Josh Rose<br />digital.tattoo@ubc.ca<br />
Meaning in context<br />
Highly visible…<br />
…and hard to remove!<br />
What’s your digital tattoo?<br />If Facebook were a country, <br />it would be the third largest in the world, <br />betwe...
What’s your digital tattoo?<br />CU<br />
Activity 1:Your Digital Tattoo?<br />Search your name/partner’s name using:<br /><ul><li>Google (select for images, movies...
www.pipl.com
www.spezify.com
MIT’s Personas at http://personas.media.mit.edu/</li></ul>Consider your impressions of this person based on what you found...
Was this an accurate representation?
What concerns were raised?</li></ul>CU<br />
UBC Students’ Perspectives…<br />
Josh’s Identity	<br />
Brock’s Identity<br />CU<br />
Camille’s Identity<br />
Crowdsourcing<br />
Broad Context<br />Some things haven’t changed…<br />People continue to redefine their personal and professional identitie...
Online activity takes place <br />before a vast audience<br />Scale<br />TR<br />
The audience can be invisible<br />and anonymous<br />TR<br />
Content is replicable in a world of…<br /> copy and paste, @RT, forward, share, <embed><br />CU<br />
Examples: Posting, Cutting, Pasting, Tagging is Easy-Peasy!<br />Good judgment develops over time. The internet on its own...
Connect, collaborate <br />and network<br />Build community/<br />learn together<br />Access a wide range <br />of people/...
Discussion<br />
Social Media: First Nations and Inuit<br />
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  • Given it’s prominence in the press, maybe Facebook is something we’re all well aware of that this stage……but how many of you also blog? Tweet? Have a cell phone or mobile device? Do you use location aps? Ever bought anything online? How about a Netflix account? iTunes? Amazon? Many of these are optimized for collecting data about you and creating a profile that allows companies to tailor their advertising toward your interests? Do you love the convenience or does this occasionally concern you?We do have a digital identity, some of which we control and some of which is controlled by others. If I searched your name online right now, what might I find out about you?
  • Participants find a partner and search each other’s names online.
  • We interviewed students on campus and asked them what we’d find out about them online. This video is a good reflection of the typical responses we get in UBC student workshops… [click to play]
  • This is what comes up when I Google my name:The top entry is for an Australian soccer player named Joshua Rose.The second one is for a recording artist from Wisconsin.There are several entries for singer-song writers named Josh Rose.There is a digital creative director at an ad agency in Los Angeles named Josh Rose.Only the very last entry was actually created by me when I sent a tweet and a friend shared it with his network.Because of how many Josh Rose’s there are in the world, my own online identity is not very prominent which can be both good and bad. So, overall, nothing awful or incriminating that I don’t want others to find. But what about people that gain unexpected notoriety?
  • CamilleCacnio is a UBC biology student. She was caight on video (later posted on Youtube) walking out of a formalwear store during the riot carrying two pairs of pants. She was identified online. She lost her job. Online, people have suggested that the charity she was volunteering for not be given any money. Similarly, UBC donors have been urged to give elsewhere if she isn’t expelled.UBC decided not to take any disciniplanary action. Each student has many identities; the fact that a rioter may be enrolled at a school is incidentatel to what happened.
  • The way that many of these people have been identified is through crowdsourcing. This refers to outsourcing a task, traditionally performed by a single organization, person, government entity, to a large, undefined group of people or community – hence “crowd”.After the riots, there were several websites set up devoted to identifying people in the pictures for use by the police.Identifytherioters.comand vancityriotcriminals.comPeople who knew those pictured disclosed their identity online and to the police often by linking a Facebook profile to the person pictured. Is this ethical?On the one hand, it’s seemingly effective as many of the people pictured taking parts in the riots have been identified. On the other hand, it raises questions about citizen surveillance, vigilantism, online harassment. One editorial following the riots pointed out that “What social media is for – or what it can be for, if we use it to its fullest potential – is to create community. And there is nothing that will erode community faster, both online and off, than creating a society of mutual surveillance.”So we use the example of the Vancouver Hockey riots because it’s timely and it illustrates how our online identities can be shaped. It isn’t meant to scare people. Because there are so many things that social media allow us to do. But at the same time, it’s good to stop and think occasionally about the implications of our digital tattoos as well. Turn it over to Trish.
  • While recent national survey data are lacking, local and regional statistics leave no question regarding the proclivity of Aboriginal youth for social media.The latest Statistics Canada data on Internet use by off-reserve Aboriginal people goes back to 2001, at which time those of Aboriginal ancestry off-reserve were deemed “just as likely to use the Internet as non-Aboriginal people, with 72 percent logging in at least several times a week.”A “second digital divide” among aboriginal Internet users. “This term acknowledges that there can be a divide between users themselves, based on whether they are frequent Internet users, are confident of their skills, use the technology effectively, or view the Internet as valuable…”Native Facebook, whose creators are based in Winnipeg, has almost 37,000 members.
  • A 2007 survey of more than 1000 First Nations users of MyK-Net, a north western Ontario network of interlinked homepages that has served as a vehicle for social networking since the late 90s, revealed that 92 percent had their own homepage and that many updated it once-to-several times a day (36.6%) or several times a week (21.3%).
  • A study on Inuktitut language in Nunavik (Northern Quebec) showed that in 2007 more than 96% of the young people interviewed used social media
  • Some other useful resources you can access via these slides include…
  • Native youth

    1. 1. Highly Visible and Hard to Remove<br />Trish Rosseel<br />Josh Rose<br />digital.tattoo@ubc.ca<br />
    2. 2.
    3. 3. Meaning in context<br />
    4. 4. Highly visible…<br />
    5. 5. …and hard to remove!<br />
    6. 6. What’s your digital tattoo?<br />If Facebook were a country, <br />it would be the third largest in the world, <br />between the United States (~300 million) and India (~1.2 billion)!<br />CU<br />
    7. 7. What’s your digital tattoo?<br />CU<br />
    8. 8. Activity 1:Your Digital Tattoo?<br />Search your name/partner’s name using:<br /><ul><li>Google (select for images, movies, etc. too)
    9. 9. www.pipl.com
    10. 10. www.spezify.com
    11. 11. MIT’s Personas at http://personas.media.mit.edu/</li></ul>Consider your impressions of this person based on what you found online.<br /><ul><li>What did you find?
    12. 12. Was this an accurate representation?
    13. 13. What concerns were raised?</li></ul>CU<br />
    14. 14. UBC Students’ Perspectives…<br />
    15. 15. Josh’s Identity <br />
    16. 16. Brock’s Identity<br />CU<br />
    17. 17. Camille’s Identity<br />
    18. 18. Crowdsourcing<br />
    19. 19. Broad Context<br />Some things haven’t changed…<br />People continue to redefine their personal and professional identities as organizations and technologies change.<br />We still search for social connections and validation. <br />Youth are still exploring and experimenting with risky behavior.<br />What has changed is the fact that there could very well be a <br />permanent record of all of this, one with implications that <br />can't be predicted or controlled. Common Sense Media<br />TR<br />
    20. 20. Online activity takes place <br />before a vast audience<br />Scale<br />TR<br />
    21. 21. The audience can be invisible<br />and anonymous<br />TR<br />
    22. 22. Content is replicable in a world of…<br /> copy and paste, @RT, forward, share, <embed><br />CU<br />
    23. 23. Examples: Posting, Cutting, Pasting, Tagging is Easy-Peasy!<br />Good judgment develops over time. The internet on its own doesn’t reflect process – just product.<br />CU<br />
    24. 24. Connect, collaborate <br />and network<br />Build community/<br />learn together<br />Access a wide range <br />of people/resources<br />
    25. 25. Discussion<br />
    26. 26. Social Media: First Nations and Inuit<br />
    27. 27. Social Media: First Nations and Inuit<br />
    28. 28. Social Media: First Nations and Inuit<br /> A study on Inuktitut language in Nunavik (Northern Quebec) showed that in 2007 more than 96% of the young people interviewed used social media<br />
    29. 29. Resources<br /> boyd, danah. 2009. "Social Media is Here to Stay... Now What?" Microsoft Research Tech Fest, Redmond, Washington, February 26. Retrieved March 10, 2009: http://www.danah.org/papers/talks/MSRTechFest2009.html<br />Rego, B. (2009). Teachers Guide to Using Facebook.<br />Social Media Guideleines: a Collective Approachhttp://socialmediaguidelines.pbworks.com/Faculty-and-Staff-Guidelines<br />Taylor, A. (2011). Social Media as a Tool for Inclusion.<br />Review/re-use this presentation:<br />http://www.slideshare.net/digitaltattoo/<br />tr<br />
    30. 30. For Your Reference...<br />Digital Tattoo<br />Pew Internet Research<br />danah boyd | apophenia<br />This is Me<br />Open Thinking<br />Frontline: Digital Nation: Life on the Virtual Frontier<br />Common Sense Media (for educators)<br />Statistics Canada - Socio-demographic factors influencing use of the Internet) <br />Deal.org<br />Social Network Site Privacy: A Comparative Analysis of Six Sites. The Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada<br />
    31. 31. Photo credits<br /><ul><li>Arm and Ink | Flickr - Photo Sharing! (n.d.). . Retrieved September 24, 2010, from http://www.flickr.com/photos/question_everything/3710548944/
    32. 32. Candy Coloured Tunnel on Flickr - Photo Sharing! (n.d.). . Retrieved May 6, 2010, from http://www.flickr.com/photos/atomicjeep/2327546948/
    33. 33. Liverpool Street station crowd blur on Flickr - Photo Sharing! (n.d.). . Retrieved May 6, 2010, from http://www.flickr.com/photos/victoriapeckham/164175205/
    34. 34. Repeating Shadows on Flickr - Photo Sharing! (n.d.). . Retrieved May 6, 2010, from http://www.flickr.com/photos/nikonvscanon/1474906347/
    35. 35. The art of possibility on Flickr - Photo Sharing! (n.d.). . Retrieved May 6, 2010, from http://www.flickr.com/photos/debaird/178785182/
    36. 36. Inuktitut Stop sign – Wikimedia Commons (2004).. Retrieved July 11, 2011, from http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:IqaluitStop.jpg
    37. 37. Flipping Cars, Lighting Cop Car – Identify the Rioters (2011).. Retrieved July 11, 2011 from http://www.identifyrioters.com/
    38. 38. BMO Bank Destruction – Vancouver 2011 Riot Criminal List (2011).. Retrieved July 11, 2011 from http://vancityriotcriminals.tumblr.com/</li>
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