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Digital Tattoo: What's Yours?
Digital Tattoo: What's Yours?
Digital Tattoo: What's Yours?
Digital Tattoo: What's Yours?
Digital Tattoo: What's Yours?
Digital Tattoo: What's Yours?
Digital Tattoo: What's Yours?
Digital Tattoo: What's Yours?
Digital Tattoo: What's Yours?
Digital Tattoo: What's Yours?
Digital Tattoo: What's Yours?
Digital Tattoo: What's Yours?
Digital Tattoo: What's Yours?
Digital Tattoo: What's Yours?
Digital Tattoo: What's Yours?
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Digital Tattoo: What's Yours?

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This was a workshop presented to a class of grade 9 students in the Vancouver School Board. The materials were developed in consultation with the classroom teacher, with the intention that she would …

This was a workshop presented to a class of grade 9 students in the Vancouver School Board. The materials were developed in consultation with the classroom teacher, with the intention that she would be able to use them with several classes. The case studies and questions were used to stimulate small group discussion. The students also completed a short online survey about their own online behavior, prior to the workshop and results were shared with the class.

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  • Definition This may be helpful as an addition to the definition (a little broader context): Danah Boyd, Harvard Fellow and Researcher at Microsoft describes some key properties and dynamics that alter the way we interact with one another. These features include: persistence (what you put out on the internet stays there), replicability (the cut and paste phenomenon), searchability (you can be found), scalability (what you say to one reaches many) and (de)locatabilty (we’re both mobile – not connected to a single space- and findable – by virtue of our portable devices). These properties and the alteration of social dynamics to include invisible audiences, collapsed contexts and the blurring of public and private spaces means that we are dealing with a new, ever changing landscape of communication and relationship. As Danah Boyd states:   “ One of the key challenges is learning how to adapt to an environment in which these properties and dynamics play a key role.”   boyd, danah. 2009. "Social Media is Here to Stay... Now What?" Microsoft Research Tech Fest, Redmond, Washington, February 26. Retrieved March 10, 2009: http://www.danah.org/papers/talks/MSRTechFest2009.html
  • Definition This may be helpful as an addition to the definition (a little broader context): 1. Persistence. What you say sticks around. This is great for asynchronicity, not so great when everything you've ever said has gone down on your permanent record. The bits-wise nature of social media means that a great deal of content produced through social media is persistent by default. 2. Replicability. You can copy and paste a conversation from one medium to another, adding to the persistent nature of it. This is great for being able to share information, but it is also at the crux of rumor-spreading. Worse: while you can replicate a conversation, it's much easier to alter what's been said than to confirm that it's an accurate portrayal of the original conversation. This is the cornerstone of bullying. 3. Searchability. My mother would've loved to scream search into the air and figure out where I'd run off with friends. She couldn't; I'm quite thankful. But with social media, it's quite easy to track someone down or to find someone as a result of searching for content. Search changes the landscape, making information available at our fingertips. This is great in some circumstances, but when trying to avoid those who hold power over you, it may be less than ideal. 4. Scalability. Social media scales things in new ways. Conversations that were intended for just a friend or two might spiral out of control and scale to the entire school or, if it is especially embarrassing, the whole world. Of course, just because something can scale doesn't mean that it will. Politicians and marketers have learned this one the hard way. And what does scale is often totally humiliating. This was learned by the kid with the light saber. Of course, for those who have been watching the Interwebz these days, you might have been pleased to watch the Susan Boyle meme take off. It's nice to have moments where the world seems kind and self-reflective, isn't it? 5. (de)locatability. With the mobile, you are dislocated from any particular point in space, but at the same time, location-based technologies make location much more relevant. This paradox means that we are simultaneously more and less connected to physical space.
  • Work in pairs (5 mins). Identify all of the places where you have contributed or created content online. Debrief with larger group (5 min) (capture this).
  • Introduce the tutorial: context that it aims to help students make informed choices about create/contributing online content in personal, academic and professional realms  more on this later in cases Aimed at new university students however, it has a broader use among people who are using the internet and maybe haven’t thought a lot about their digital identities.
  • Sample page: approach is to introduce some questions – have people consider an example or case study than some points to follow up with and a self quiz. Bookmarks with url on it for your later exploration
  • Groups of three (3 cases for discussion) Considering the case you were told about, discuss the questions and any issues that this raises for you. Write down your answer to: where should you draw the line with free speech in an online environment? What did your group come up with? Share with the class. Key Points from Article: Teen was banned from taking a position in student government at her high school because she called some school officials “douchebags” on her social networking page. Student was labelled “cyberbully” whose writings threatened to disrupt operations at the school. National Crime prevention Council define cyberbullying as ” use “the Internet, cell phones, or other devices ... to send or post text or images intended to hurt or embarrass another person.” The issue of cyberbullying became the focus of a national debate last year, after Lori Drew, 49, was prosecuted in connection with the suicide of 13-year-old Megan Meier. Drew and an employee of her small business assumed a false identity, that of a 16-year-old boy. After winning Megan’s trust, they began sending her venomous messages through her MySpace account. However, where do laws about harrassment/cyberbullying infringe on rights of free speech? What do you think?
  • Groups of three (3 cases for discussion) Considering the case you were told about, discuss the questions and any issues that this raises for you. Write down your answer to: why do you think people do sexting? Why don’t they? Take turns to share your answers with your group. What did your group come up with? Share with the class. Key points from article: Based on a study from a US National Campaign to prevent teen pregancy found that 20% of surveyed teens sent suggestive photos (slightly more girls than boys) and 39% of surveyed teens sent suggestive texts (slightly more boys than girls) Images can be classified as child porn by law – potentially putting anyone who is distributing these images at risk for prosecution When images meant for one person get into the hands of others – results can be public humiliation that can be very hard to recover from and (in one case) was found to be the cause of a young girl’s suicide. While we don’t have Canadian stats yet, the general impression is that this practice is becoming more common. Why?
  • Groups of three (3 cases for discussion) Considering the case you were told about, discuss the questions and any issues that this raises for you. Write down your answer to: what do you think this student learned in developing this site? What might be some concerns with showing your talents on YouTube? Advantages? Share with the class. Key points from article: This teen created a channel for himself on YouTube to share "how to" videos related to electronics, physics, etc. Although much of what he does involves building "weapons" of some kind - he really does this for fun - not any malicious intent. Youtube approached him when they saw how many hits he was getting and asked him if he wanted to earn some money. He now earns 150-200 USD per month. The revenue comes from advertisers. Youtube recently said they now had 1 billion videos viewed in a year. It's a bit of a double edged sword here. Is this an example of using YouTube for good? profit? what are the downsides?
  • Groups of three (3 cases for discussion) Considering the case you were told about, discuss the questions and any issues that this raises for you. Write down your answer to: What do you think you learn when playing games online? What attitude do you think schools/parents should have to online time? Share with the class. Key points from article: Researcher from California suggests that kids use the internet (social networking and gaming sites to socialize, relax and learn. Virtual environments (including texts and chat) have become public hangouts for teens. Barring teens from internet use “could leave them ignorant of how to interact, not only in their youth, but also potentially in their professional lives.” A few kids learn (through gaming) how to code, fix bugs and and edit videos. Kids can be incredibly creative.
  • Groups of three (3 cases for discussion) Considering the case you were told about, discuss the questions and any issues that this raises for you. Identify one key issue that you think is the most relevant given your perspective right now. Share with the class. Key Points from Article: Paul Pritchard gets citizen journalism award for video he shot of distraught Dziekanski before tasering led to his death. He feels guilty because he could have gone and tried to talk to Dziekanski instead of shooting a video.
  • Group of 3 Considering the case you were told about, discuss the questions and any issues that this raises for you. Write down your answer to: why do you think kids want to be online? What do you think they should know before they join social networks? Take turns to share your answers with your group. What did your group come up with? Share with the class. Key points from article: More young teems are joining social networks Scientists worry that it damages brains and relationships and may contribute to internet addiction as adults. Others feel it is an opportunity to teach children about how to be safe online and limit networks to people they know. Parents feel it is important to monitor young kids pages. What do you think?
  • Transcript

    • 1. Highly Visible and Hard to Remove Grade 9 Class: Windermere Anne Scholefield Cindy Underhill
    • 2. What is a Digital Tattoo?
      • Your personal information online, including:
        • Text
        • Video
        • Photos
        • Name, address, phone number
        • Sites you visit (or pages within a site)
      • What you post yourself
      • What others post about you
      TR
    • 3. Why is this important?
      • Danah Boyd: studies US teens living and learning with new media. Some key features that alter the way we interact with each other:
      • what you put online stays there
      • it’s easy to cut and paste
      • you can be found
      • what you say to one reaches many
      • we’re mobile and findable (GPS?)
      TR
    • 4. What is Your Digital Footprint?
      • Find a partner
      • Identify all the places where you contribute/create content online
      • Share with the larger group
      TR
    • 5. Digital Tattoo Tutorial TR
    • 6. Digital Tattoo Tutorial: Work TR
    • 7. Case Study #1
      • Should freedom of speech always apply?
      • What about people who are victimized?
      • What are your personal rules for posting online?
    • 8. Case Study #2
      • Do you use your cell phone to share pics/texts about yourself or others?
      • Why do you think people do this?
      • What are the issues?
    • 9. Case Study #3
      • What do you think this person might have learned in creating the site?
      • Are there any disadvantages to sharing your talents online ?
    • 10. Case Study: Alternate
      • What do you think you learn when playing games online?
      • What attitude should schools/parents take towards online time?
    • 11. Case Study: Alternate
      • Do you use your cell phone for taking video or photos?
      • Does this change your behavior in any way?
      • Why do you think this is important?
    • 12. Case Study: Alternate
      • Who should decide when to join a social network? Parents? Kids?
      • Why do kids want to be online?
      • What should kids know before they join a network ?
    • 13. Resources
      • Digital Tattoo
      • Madden, M., Fox, S., Smith, A., & Vitak, J. (2007). Digital Footprints: Online Identity Management and Search in the Age of Transparency . Pew/Internet.
      • Rego, B. (2009). Teachers Guide to Using Facebook .
      • http://melaniemcbride.net/2009/08/27/putting-the-social-justice-in-social-media-pedagogy/
      • Richardson, W. (2008, January). Teaching Civics with Social Web Tools . District Administration , 44 (1), 56-56.
      CU
    • 14. Case Study Links
      • Social networks and kids: How young is too young? CNN Tech (2009) : http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/11/02/kids.social.networks/index.html
      • Rules to Curb Online Bullying Raise Concerns . MSNBC (2009):
        • http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/28629118
      • Kids Gain Valuable Skills From Time Online. San Francisco Chronicle (2008):
        • http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2008/11/19/BUKE147TA1.DTL
      CU
    • 15. Case Study Links
      • Man who shot Dziekanski video gets journalism award. CBC News (2009) : http://www.cbc.ca/canada/british-columbia/story/2009/10/28/bc-taser-video-cjfe.html
      • Safe "sexting?" No such thing, teens warned. Canada.com (2009):
        • http://www.canada.com/life/Safe+sexting+such+thing+teens+warned/1565206/story.html
      • ChuKoNu Productions: YouTube http:// http:// www.youtube.com/user/ChuKoNu1
      CU

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