Digital Tattoo for Student Teachers

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Presentation to student teachers in UBC's Teacher Education Program.

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  • So what do we know about tattoos? They can be a creative expression of ourselves as individuals… They can be beautiful…
  • … and they can look, feel or mean different things in different contexts (or be viewed outside of their intended context). Tattoos require a lot of careful consideration before they’re acquired, we like to use the expression…
  • Definition This may be helpful as an addition to the definition (a little broader context): Danah Boyd, Harvard Fellow and Researcher at Microsoft describes some key properties and dynamics that alter the way we interact with one another. These features include: persistence (what you put out on the internet stays there), replicability (the cut and paste phenomenon), searchability (you can be found), scalability (what you say to one reaches many) and (de)locatabilty (we’re both mobile – not connected to a single space- and findable – by virtue of our portable devices). These properties and the alteration of social dynamics to include invisible audiences, collapsed contexts and the blurring of public and private spaces means that we are dealing with a new, ever changing landscape of communication and relationship. As Danah Boyd states:   “ One of the key challenges is learning how to adapt to an environment in which these properties and dynamics play a key role.”   boyd, danah. 2009. "Social Media is Here to Stay... Now What?" Microsoft Research Tech Fest, Redmond, Washington, February 26. Retrieved March 10, 2009: http://www.danah.org/papers/talks/MSRTechFest2009.html
  • Definition This may be helpful as an addition to the definition (a little broader context): Danah Boyd, Harvard Fellow and Researcher at Microsoft describes some key properties and dynamics that alter the way we interact with one another. These features include: persistence (what you put out on the internet stays there), replicability (the cut and paste phenomenon), searchability (you can be found), scalability (what you say to one reaches many) and (de)locatabilty (we’re both mobile – not connected to a single space- and findable – by virtue of our portable devices). These properties and the alteration of social dynamics to include invisible audiences, collapsed contexts and the blurring of public and private spaces means that we are dealing with a new, ever changing landscape of communication and relationship. As Danah Boyd states:   “ One of the key challenges is learning how to adapt to an environment in which these properties and dynamics play a key role.”   boyd, danah. 2009. "Social Media is Here to Stay... Now What?" Microsoft Research Tech Fest, Redmond, Washington, February 26. Retrieved March 10, 2009: http://www.danah.org/papers/talks/MSRTechFest2009.html
  • Definition This may be helpful as an addition to the definition (a little broader context): Danah Boyd, Harvard Fellow and Researcher at Microsoft describes some key properties and dynamics that alter the way we interact with one another. These features include: persistence (what you put out on the internet stays there), replicability (the cut and paste phenomenon), searchability (you can be found), scalability (what you say to one reaches many) and (de)locatabilty (we’re both mobile – not connected to a single space- and findable – by virtue of our portable devices). These properties and the alteration of social dynamics to include invisible audiences, collapsed contexts and the blurring of public and private spaces means that we are dealing with a new, ever changing landscape of communication and relationship. As Danah Boyd states:   “ One of the key challenges is learning how to adapt to an environment in which these properties and dynamics play a key role.”   boyd, danah. 2009. "Social Media is Here to Stay... Now What?" Microsoft Research Tech Fest, Redmond, Washington, February 26. Retrieved March 10, 2009: http://www.danah.org/papers/talks/MSRTechFest2009.html
  • Danah Boyd, Harvard Fellow and Researcher at Microsoft describes some key properties and dynamics that alter the way we interact with one another. These features include: persistence (what you put out on the internet stays there) replicability (the cut and paste phenomenon): We should be aware that our online content is permanent. This is not only due to caching but because…all content in a digital space can be moved freely around the Web. This "cut and paste" culture allows rapid and widespread sharing of information, and it also means that photos, emails, IMs, comments, and more can be taken out of context and used in ways that the author didn't intend. searchability (you can be found): scalability (what you say to one reaches many): People need to know that “being online is essentially being in public.” regardless of the passwords, email accounts and privacy settings we think are protecting us. Take protective measures, yes, but consider whether you ultimately want to share information publicly before posting anything, anywhere… (de)locatabilty (we’re both mobile – not connected to a single space- and findable – by virtue of our portable devices). These properties and the alteration of social dynamics to include invisible audiences, collapsed contexts and the blurring of public and private spaces means that we are dealing with a new, ever changing landscape of communication and relationship. As Danah Boyd states:   “ One of the key challenges is learning how to adapt to an environment in which these properties and dynamics play a key role.” Anonymity: We don’t know who is viewing the information we share online and what their intentions are for using that information. Unfortunately, this illusion of anonymity leads some people to behave and interact online in ways they wouldn’t face-to-face. Eg. We’ve all heard disturbing stories of cyberbullying, (share story with time), we’ve seen some stats on sexting… and though the media focuses its attention on them, we also know these behaviours aren’t limited to young adults. So we definitely need to ask “who” are we interacting with when we choose to participate and contribute online.   boyd, danah. 2009. "Social Media is Here to Stay... Now What?" Microsoft Research Tech Fest, Redmond, Washington, February 26. Retrieved March 10, 2009: http://www.danah.org/papers/talks/MSRTechFest2009.html
  • Our presentation today, highlights 3 perspectives on digital identity: the educator’s, the individual’s and the profession of teaching itself. We’ve chosen a selection of case studies to hightlight some of the issues and we’ll engage in snippets of discussion around each one. Looking at digital identity from these 3 perspectives raises particular issues, questions and general food for thought around perceptions of truth, personal freedom, professional responsibility and the boundaries between personal, social, work and professional spaces.
  • What are the advantages to creating a blog like MsRoy’s? Disadvantages/drawbacks/cautions? Also, please have a look at this example of an e-portfolio developed by a teacher candidate from 2009: http://efolio.educ.ubc.ca/sroy/category/04-role-of-parents-and-home/   At this link she is reflecting on Standard 4.  She provides a link--"Artifact #5"--to her own, personal blog on Wordpress.com. Click on that, and you find a blog she developed for the students/parents in her practicum. What do you think? Benefits? Drawbacks? Considerations?
  • Quote from Mr. H: The biggest challenge is letting go. Being teachers we like the spotlight on us and what WE can do. Using technology becomes valuable when you set the task to the students in a simple way and just let them find new and different ways to complete it. Do not give them a roadmap for success. Make them find the signposts on the way to being successful. This is how they find new ways to complete assignments, teach other students what they have learned and become producers of information.
  • Clearly, this teacher has taken the approach that (if students are already using these sites) let’s capitalize on their potential for learning and (at the same time) help students see how these tools work from the back end (so they can understand a little more about what it means to create content responsibly.
  • Stacy Snyder, then a 25-year-old teacher in training at Conestoga Valley High School in Lancaster, Pa., posted a photo on her MySpace page that showed her at a party wearing a pirate hat and drinking from a plastic cup, with the caption “Drunken Pirate.” After discovering the page, her supervisor at the high school told her the photo was “unprofessional,” and the dean of Millersville University School of Education, where Snyder was enrolled, said she was promoting drinking in virtual view of her under-age students. As a result, days before Snyder’s scheduled graduation, the university denied her a teaching degree. Snyder sued, arguing that the university had violated her First Amendment rights by penalizing her for her (perfectly legal) after-hours behavior. But in 2008, a federal district judge rejected the claim, saying that because Snyder was a public employee whose photo didn’t relate to matters of public concern, her “Drunken Pirate” post was not protected speech. Stacy’s story is just one example of a challenge that faces all of us – in some way – how best to live our lives in an age where the Internet holds a public record of everything and forgets nothing.
  • “ a humane society values privacy, because it allows people to cultivate different aspects of their personalities in different contexts; and at the moment, the enforced merging of identities that used to be separate is leaving many casualties in its wake. Stacy Snyder couldn’t reconcile her “aspiring-teacher self” with her “having-a-few-drinks self”: even the impression, correct or not, that she had a drink in a pirate hat at an off-campus party was enough to derail her teaching career. “ Societal Forgetting important for forgiveness – we learn and adjust our behavior based on our mistakes. If we live in fear of making mistakes, we don’t learn/ grow as human beings. This may be something we are losing living in an age where everything is recorded and much of that is published in some form. Reputation bankruptcy concept introduced to us – if you don’t like what’s out there – you declare reputation bankruptcy and have a company like Reputation Defender to fix it – asking websites to remove offending info and (a skill you can learn) bombarding the internet with positive or neutral information. Technological Solutions: Expiration dates could be implemented more broadly in various ways. Researchers at the University of Washington , for example, are developing a technology called Vanish that makes electronic data “self-destruct” after a specified period of time. Instead of relying on Google, Facebook or Hotmail to delete the data that is stored “in the cloud” — in other words, on their distributed servers — Vanish encrypts the data and then “shatters” the encryption key. Forgiveness: privacy controls not enough – you can control what you put out there (to some extent) but you can’t control what others put out there about you. Maybe (as we are flooded with information about each other) we’ll get to a saturation point where we’ll start to learn – again- how to forgive – how not to judge without a fuller context.
  • This story raises the issue of the blurred lines between our personal and professional lives when we are sharing the same online platforms with students (Facebook, Twitter, etc). Some educators feel that teachers should avoid using social media with their students altogether – others (Toronto District School Board) are developing social media guidelines for its teachers.   In light of recent charges against a student teacher in Abbotsford, The Vancouver Board of Education has told its teachers flatly that communicating with students using personal e-mail accounts and being "friends" with students on social networking sites is "unacceptable behaviour."   Just over half of the teachers that responded to a survey by BC College of teachers a couple of years ago – said they refuse friend requests from students. Some say their Facebook connections deepen their understanding of students lives. Registrar of BC College of teachers feel that those connections may make students and teachers vulnerable.
  • Introduce the tutorial: context that it aims to help students make informed choices about create/contributing online content in personal, academic and professional realms  more on this later in cases Goals for the broader project Show the Work section: Link to teacher guidelines for Facebook Employers Dig For Dirt Portfolios: MsRoy’s portfolio: http://efolio.educ.ubc.ca/sroy/category/04-role-of-parents-and-home/
  • Digital Tattoo for Student Teachers

    1. 1. Highly Visible and Hard to Remove EDUC 316 Anne Scholefield Trish Rosseel Cindy Underhill
    2. 3. meaning in context
    3. 4. highly visible TR
    4. 5. ...and hard to remove TR
    5. 6. Do you have a digital tattoo? TR <ul><li>With your laptop/smartphone, choose one of the 3 tools to search yourself. </li></ul><ul><li>Pipl.com </li></ul><ul><li>Spezify.com </li></ul><ul><li>Personas: http://personas.media.mit.edu/personasWeb.html </li></ul>
    6. 7. Dynamics that Change Interaction <ul><li>Persistence: hard to remove </li></ul><ul><li>Replicability: copy/paste, @RT, <embed> </li></ul><ul><li>Searchability: Google, Pipl, FB, LinkIn </li></ul><ul><li>Scalability: potentially vast audience </li></ul><ul><li>(De)locatability </li></ul><ul><li>Anonymity: the illusion of… </li></ul>TR   boyd, danah. 2009. &quot;Social Media is Here to Stay... Now What?&quot;
    7. 8. Digital Ink: 3 Perspectives <ul><li>#1: Educator </li></ul>#3: Profession #2: Individual TR Portfolio Practice
    8. 9. Digital ink...your portfolio <ul><li>Your e-portfolio, blog… </li></ul><ul><li>Why? </li></ul><ul><li>Who? </li></ul><ul><li>Concerns? </li></ul>AS Ms. Roy’s portfolio: http://efolio.educ.ubc.ca/sroy/category/04-role-of-parents-and-home/ 
    9. 10. The Educator: Mr. H <ul><li>Offers a blog as support hub to grade 8 Math students </li></ul><ul><li>Uses a variety of freely available online platforms for students to create and publish. </li></ul><ul><li>Class accounts are used and student blogs are private. </li></ul>cu Mr. H’s support hub: http://sargentparkmathzone.blogspot.com/
    10. 11. The Broader Context: Learning to be Digital Citizens cu Create, share, be anonymous or not
    11. 12. The Broader Context: Teaching Digital Citizenship cu
    12. 13. Consider: your view as an educator <ul><li>In groups of 3, discuss: </li></ul><ul><li>What responsibility does a teacher have to helping students learn to become responsible digital citizens? </li></ul>cu Website: http://bit.ly/acjJi
    13. 14. The Individual: Stacy Snyder <ul><li>2006: student teacher “drinking” called into question. She was denied a teaching degree. </li></ul><ul><li>2008: judge rejected her claim that this violated her First Amendment right to free speech. </li></ul><ul><li>2010: her photo & story lives on in perpetuity. </li></ul>cu
    14. 15. The Broader Context: The Web Means the End of Forgetting <ul><li>Context often lost on the web </li></ul><ul><li>“ Societal forgetting” important. </li></ul><ul><li>Reputation bankruptcy – new “fresh start”. </li></ul><ul><li>Technological solutions: expiration dates for data. </li></ul><ul><li>Forgiveness: explore new ways of living in digital world. </li></ul>cu New York Times: July 21, 2010
    15. 16. Consider: your personal view <ul><li>In groups of 3, discuss: </li></ul><ul><li>How would you defend/discuss/respond to a public view of you that was taken out of context? How would you defend your right to personal freedom? </li></ul><ul><li>Website: http://nyti.ms/dpAcKM </li></ul>cu
    16. 17. The Profession: Teaching <ul><li>Ontario College of teachers social media guidelines. </li></ul><ul><li>Vancouver Board deems “friending” and personal email “unacceptable”. </li></ul><ul><li>Blurred boundaries leave students and teachers vulnerable. </li></ul>AS
    17. 18. Broader Context: BC College of Teachers <ul><li>Standard 2: Educators are role models who act ethically and honestly. </li></ul><ul><li>“ The Supreme Court of Canada has determined that educators are held to a higher standard than other citizens due to their unique role in society.” </li></ul><ul><li>From: BC College of Teachers: http://www.bcct.ca/Standards/QuestionsCaseStudiesContents.aspx# </li></ul>AS
    18. 19. The Broader Context: Policy and Guidelines AS http://socialmediaguidelines.pbworks.com/Faculty-and-Staff-Guidelines The government approach The collective approach the practical approach ?
    19. 20. Consider: your view as part of a larger profession <ul><li>In groups of 3, discuss: </li></ul><ul><li>How do you balance your professional obligation to serve as a role model (standard#2) with your personal life online? </li></ul><ul><li>What role (if any) do you want your professional association to play in helping you with this? </li></ul>AS Website: http://bit.ly/bTUAxo
    20. 21. Design your digital tattoo... TR personal professional part of a profession
    21. 22. Digital Tattoo Tutorial TR
    22. 23. Resources <ul><li>BC College of Teachers: Standards, Questions and Case Studies http://www.bcct.ca/Standards/QuestionsCaseStudiesContents.aspx# </li></ul><ul><li>  boyd, danah. 2009. &quot;Social Media is Here to Stay... Now What?&quot; Microsoft Research Tech Fest, Redmond, Washington, February 26. Retrieved March 10, 2009 : http://www.danah.org/papers/talks/MSRTechFest2009.html </li></ul><ul><li>Digital Tattoo : digitaltattoo.ubc.ca </li></ul><ul><li>Madden, M., Fox, S., Smith, A., & Vitak, J. (2007). Digital Footprints: Online Identity Management and Search in the Age of Transparency . Pew/Internet. </li></ul><ul><li>McBride, Melanie (2010) http://melaniemcbride.net/2009/08/27/putting-the-social-justice-in-social-media-pedagogy/ </li></ul><ul><li>Ontario College’s “Use of Electronic Communication and Social Media”   http://www.oct.ca/publications/PDF/Prof_Adv_Soc_Media_EN.pdf </li></ul><ul><li>Rego, B. (2009). Teachers Guide to Using Facebook . </li></ul><ul><li>Richardson, W. (2008, January). Teaching Civics with Social Web Tools . District Administration , 44 (1), 56-56. </li></ul><ul><li>Rosen, Jeffrey (2010) The Web Means the End of Forgetting , New York Times. </li></ul><ul><li>Quan, Douglas (2010) Facebook Blurs Line Between Teacher and Friend , Vancouver Sun. </li></ul>tr
    23. 24. Resources <ul><li>Class Blogs </li></ul><ul><li>Welcome to Blogging: class intro for elementary students - Sargeant Park Math Zone: http://bit.ly/du9X1k </li></ul><ul><li>Create a Class Blog (2010)-Edublogger: http://bit.ly/7s2CZe </li></ul><ul><li>Sarah Roy’s Class Blog: http://msroy.wordpress.com/ </li></ul><ul><li>Review/re-use this presentation: </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.slideshare.net/digitaltattoo/digital-tattoo-for-teacher-candidates-2011 </li></ul>tr

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