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Introduction to Mercurial
 

Introduction to Mercurial

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A short talk on Mercurial i gave at Barcamp Scotland 2008

A short talk on Mercurial i gave at Barcamp Scotland 2008

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    Introduction to Mercurial Introduction to Mercurial Presentation Transcript

    • Barcamp Scotland 2008 Introduction to Mercurial How to improve your source control. Tane Piper digitalspaghetti@gmail.com http://digitalspaghetti.me.uk http://twitter.com/tanepiper February 2nd, 2008 Tane Piper digitalspaghetti@gmail.com Introduction to Mercurial
    • Introduction What Is Covered? A (Short) History of Source Control Tane Piper digitalspaghetti@gmail.com Introduction to Mercurial
    • Introduction What Is Covered? A (Short) History of Source Control Distributed Source Control Tane Piper digitalspaghetti@gmail.com Introduction to Mercurial
    • Introduction What Is Covered? A (Short) History of Source Control Distributed Source Control Mercurial itself Tane Piper digitalspaghetti@gmail.com Introduction to Mercurial
    • Introduction What Is Covered? A (Short) History of Source Control Distributed Source Control Mercurial itself How to import your project Tane Piper digitalspaghetti@gmail.com Introduction to Mercurial
    • Introduction What Is Covered? A (Short) History of Source Control Distributed Source Control Mercurial itself How to import your project Download from http://tinyurl.com/2spv4h Tane Piper digitalspaghetti@gmail.com Introduction to Mercurial
    • A (Short) History of Source Control I SCCS (Source Code Control System) Marc Rochkind wrote at Bell Labs, in the early 1970s. Tane Piper digitalspaghetti@gmail.com Introduction to Mercurial
    • A (Short) History of Source Control I SCCS (Source Code Control System) Marc Rochkind wrote at Bell Labs, in the early 1970s. SCCS operated on individual files and every author had access to a shared workspace on a single system. Tane Piper digitalspaghetti@gmail.com Introduction to Mercurial
    • A (Short) History of Source Control I SCCS (Source Code Control System) Marc Rochkind wrote at Bell Labs, in the early 1970s. SCCS operated on individual files and every author had access to a shared workspace on a single system. It was common for people to lock files, and later forget to unlock them, preventing anyone else from modifying those files without the help of an administrator. Tane Piper digitalspaghetti@gmail.com Introduction to Mercurial
    • A (Short) History of Source Control II Dick Grune developed CVS (Concurrent Versions System). Tane Piper digitalspaghetti@gmail.com Introduction to Mercurial
    • A (Short) History of Source Control II Dick Grune developed CVS (Concurrent Versions System). CVS let developers work simultaneously and somewhat independently in their own personal workspaces. Tane Piper digitalspaghetti@gmail.com Introduction to Mercurial
    • A (Short) History of Source Control II Dick Grune developed CVS (Concurrent Versions System). CVS let developers work simultaneously and somewhat independently in their own personal workspaces. They had to merge their edits prior to committing changes to the central repository. Tane Piper digitalspaghetti@gmail.com Introduction to Mercurial
    • A (Short) History of Source Control III In 2001 Jim Blandy and Karl Fogel developed Subversion. Tane Piper digitalspaghetti@gmail.com Introduction to Mercurial
    • A (Short) History of Source Control III In 2001 Jim Blandy and Karl Fogel developed Subversion. Subversion, does not stray from CVS’s centralised client/server model. Tane Piper digitalspaghetti@gmail.com Introduction to Mercurial
    • A (Short) History of Source Control III In 2001 Jim Blandy and Karl Fogel developed Subversion. Subversion, does not stray from CVS’s centralised client/server model. Added features such as multi-file atomic commits and better namespace management. Tane Piper digitalspaghetti@gmail.com Introduction to Mercurial
    • A (Short) History of Source Control III In 2001 Jim Blandy and Karl Fogel developed Subversion. Subversion, does not stray from CVS’s centralised client/server model. Added features such as multi-file atomic commits and better namespace management. At the same time Graydon Hoare was working on Monotone. Tane Piper digitalspaghetti@gmail.com Introduction to Mercurial
    • A (Short) History of Source Control III In 2001 Jim Blandy and Karl Fogel developed Subversion. Subversion, does not stray from CVS’s centralised client/server model. Added features such as multi-file atomic commits and better namespace management. At the same time Graydon Hoare was working on Monotone. Featured cryptographic hashes as identifiers, and has an integral notion of ”trust” for code from different sources. Tane Piper digitalspaghetti@gmail.com Introduction to Mercurial
    • Distributed Version Control What is Distributed Version Control? Tane Piper digitalspaghetti@gmail.com Introduction to Mercurial
    • Distributed Version Control (DVCS) Both git and Mercurial were announced in April 2005 to replace the withdrawal of free BitKeeper VC software, which was used to control the Linux kernel. Tane Piper digitalspaghetti@gmail.com Introduction to Mercurial
    • Distributed Version Control (DVCS) Both git and Mercurial were announced in April 2005 to replace the withdrawal of free BitKeeper VC software, which was used to control the Linux kernel. git developed by Linus Torvalds to manage the Linux kernel. Tane Piper digitalspaghetti@gmail.com Introduction to Mercurial
    • Distributed Version Control (DVCS) Both git and Mercurial were announced in April 2005 to replace the withdrawal of free BitKeeper VC software, which was used to control the Linux kernel. git developed by Linus Torvalds to manage the Linux kernel. Mercurial was also developed for kernel, but git won out. Tane Piper digitalspaghetti@gmail.com Introduction to Mercurial
    • An Example of the DVCS Model Figure: An example of the Mercurial distributed model. Tane Piper digitalspaghetti@gmail.com Introduction to Mercurial
    • Simple description of the DVCS model No repository is king - no ”central” repository except for one agreed in a social fashion. Tane Piper digitalspaghetti@gmail.com Introduction to Mercurial
    • Simple description of the DVCS model No repository is king - no ”central” repository except for one agreed in a social fashion. Can be thought of as ”the bittorrent of the DVCS world”, compaired to CVS/SVN model which is akin to a FTP. Tane Piper digitalspaghetti@gmail.com Introduction to Mercurial
    • Simple description of the DVCS model No repository is king - no ”central” repository except for one agreed in a social fashion. Can be thought of as ”the bittorrent of the DVCS world”, compaired to CVS/SVN model which is akin to a FTP. Cloning repositories locally allows for more experimentation. Tane Piper digitalspaghetti@gmail.com Introduction to Mercurial
    • Simple description of the DVCS model No repository is king - no ”central” repository except for one agreed in a social fashion. Can be thought of as ”the bittorrent of the DVCS world”, compaired to CVS/SVN model which is akin to a FTP. Cloning repositories locally allows for more experimentation. As simple to set up as typing ’hg init’. Tane Piper digitalspaghetti@gmail.com Introduction to Mercurial
    • Mercurial Itself Excellent support on Windows / Unix / MacOSX Tane Piper digitalspaghetti@gmail.com Introduction to Mercurial
    • Mercurial Itself Excellent support on Windows / Unix / MacOSX Tools such as TortoiseHG for Windows, QCT, Push Me Pull You, etc make usage easy. Tane Piper digitalspaghetti@gmail.com Introduction to Mercurial
    • Mercurial Itself Excellent support on Windows / Unix / MacOSX Tools such as TortoiseHG for Windows, QCT, Push Me Pull You, etc make usage easy. Functionality can be added through an extension API with hooks (e.g. pre and post commit). Tane Piper digitalspaghetti@gmail.com Introduction to Mercurial
    • Mercurial Itself Excellent support on Windows / Unix / MacOSX Tools such as TortoiseHG for Windows, QCT, Push Me Pull You, etc make usage easy. Functionality can be added through an extension API with hooks (e.g. pre and post commit). Doesn’t pollute the namespace - keeps everything in one ’.hg’ directory. Tane Piper digitalspaghetti@gmail.com Introduction to Mercurial
    • Mercurial Itself Excellent support on Windows / Unix / MacOSX Tools such as TortoiseHG for Windows, QCT, Push Me Pull You, etc make usage easy. Functionality can be added through an extension API with hooks (e.g. pre and post commit). Doesn’t pollute the namespace - keeps everything in one ’.hg’ directory. Provides it’s own web interface - hgweb (hgwebdir for a collection of repositories). Tane Piper digitalspaghetti@gmail.com Introduction to Mercurial
    • Mercurial Commands I ’hg init <name>’ - This initialises the local repository. You can do this command within the root folder too. Tane Piper digitalspaghetti@gmail.com Introduction to Mercurial
    • Mercurial Commands I ’hg init <name>’ - This initialises the local repository. You can do this command within the root folder too. ’hg add’ - This will add any files within the directory structure to the local repository. Tane Piper digitalspaghetti@gmail.com Introduction to Mercurial
    • Mercurial Commands I ’hg init <name>’ - This initialises the local repository. You can do this command within the root folder too. ’hg add’ - This will add any files within the directory structure to the local repository. ’hg commit’ - This will commit any changes to your local repository. Tane Piper digitalspaghetti@gmail.com Introduction to Mercurial
    • Mercurial Commands I ’hg init <name>’ - This initialises the local repository. You can do this command within the root folder too. ’hg add’ - This will add any files within the directory structure to the local repository. ’hg commit’ - This will commit any changes to your local repository. ’hg push’ - This will push any changes to your repository. Tane Piper digitalspaghetti@gmail.com Introduction to Mercurial
    • Mercurial Commands II ’hg pull’ - This will pull the content to your local repository from the remote repository set in the config file. Tane Piper digitalspaghetti@gmail.com Introduction to Mercurial
    • Mercurial Commands II ’hg pull’ - This will pull the content to your local repository from the remote repository set in the config file. ’hg update’ - Updates and merges pulls to local repository where no heads are created (i.e. if you have made no local changes since your last pull). Tane Piper digitalspaghetti@gmail.com Introduction to Mercurial
    • Mercurial Commands II ’hg pull’ - This will pull the content to your local repository from the remote repository set in the config file. ’hg update’ - Updates and merges pulls to local repository where no heads are created (i.e. if you have made no local changes since your last pull). ’hg merge’ - This will merge any heads created by pushing/pulling from repositories. Tane Piper digitalspaghetti@gmail.com Introduction to Mercurial
    • Mercurial Commands II ’hg pull’ - This will pull the content to your local repository from the remote repository set in the config file. ’hg update’ - Updates and merges pulls to local repository where no heads are created (i.e. if you have made no local changes since your last pull). ’hg merge’ - This will merge any heads created by pushing/pulling from repositories. ’hg log’ - View a list of changesets. Tane Piper digitalspaghetti@gmail.com Introduction to Mercurial
    • How Mercurial Changesets Work Figure: A example of linear changesets. This is very common in repositories from one developer and once branch. Tane Piper digitalspaghetti@gmail.com Introduction to Mercurial
    • Simultaneous Local Changesets Figure: Two local repositories with different changeset histories. Tane Piper digitalspaghetti@gmail.com Introduction to Mercurial
    • Results of pulling a changeset into your local repository. Figure: Pulling a remote repository’s tip into your local repository creates 2 heads. These need to be merged before you can continue. Tane Piper digitalspaghetti@gmail.com Introduction to Mercurial
    • Results of merging heads. Figure: Merging the two heads together creates a new head. This can now be pushed or pulled to other repositories and merged with other heads. Tane Piper digitalspaghetti@gmail.com Introduction to Mercurial
    • Thank you for listning. Check out more about Mercurial at http://tinyurl.com/3xphcz Tane Piper digitalspaghetti@gmail.com Introduction to Mercurial
    • Thank you for listning. Check out more about Mercurial at http://tinyurl.com/3xphcz SHAMELESS PLUG - Follow the progress of Mercurial Frontend at http://digitalspaghetti.me.uk Tane Piper digitalspaghetti@gmail.com Introduction to Mercurial
    • Thank you for listning. Check out more about Mercurial at http://tinyurl.com/3xphcz SHAMELESS PLUG - Follow the progress of Mercurial Frontend at http://digitalspaghetti.me.uk Comments welcome at digitalspaghetti@gmail.com Tane Piper digitalspaghetti@gmail.com Introduction to Mercurial
    • Thank you for listning. Check out more about Mercurial at http://tinyurl.com/3xphcz SHAMELESS PLUG - Follow the progress of Mercurial Frontend at http://digitalspaghetti.me.uk Comments welcome at digitalspaghetti@gmail.com You can download these slides from http://hg.digitalspaghetti.me.uk/hgtalk Tane Piper digitalspaghetti@gmail.com Introduction to Mercurial