and the way the way the world learns.
CLASSROOMS
WALLS
without
Changing the Way the World Learns
INCREMENTAL
IMPROVING
EXISTING
Process & Services
INNOVAT
ION
INNOVAT
IONORIGINAL
IDEASThat have value
IMPLEMENT
ING
Used by a significant number of people
DISRUPTIVE
THE NEW
Learning
AGENT
S
&
DISRUPTIVE
THE NEW AGEN
OF LEARNING
Framing a dialogue about
new roles and functions
for supporting learning
in a new environment.
Learning
Activators
Learning
Analytics
Participatory
Learning
Transliteracy
Deep Learning
Design
Changing the Way the World Learns
Bridging
THE
GENERA TION
GA P
Reaching across history to include pre-digital media
social skills
cultural
competencies
TRANSLITER
ACY
NEW
WAYS OF
KNOWING
innovative
skills & practices
moving across
media & modes
of creation
CHALLEN
GES
new ways of communicating
ASSUMPTIONS
about the
language
of learning
DOMINANCE
of text-based
learning,
INNOVAT...
TEACHING
TRANSLITERATE
TRANSLITERATE
DISJUNCTURE
Between
Text-based
and
Changing the Way the World Learns
RECONCILING
The Language of School & Youth
MEDIA
LITERA
CY
RESEAR
CH
SKILLS
DECISIV
E
LITERA
CY
INFORMAT
ION
ETHICS
Open
A...
RESEARCH
SKILLS
Fluency
Digital
Information
for finding digital information
RESEARCH SKILLS
SKILLS to use
specialized TOOLS
What
information
am I looking for?
How good is the
Information? Where will I find
the information?
How will I
get there?
H...
Web 2.0 Internet Information Has Changed
RESEARCH SKILLS
ABILITY TO SEARCH
for correct information
KNOWING HOW TO ACCESS& ...
ResearchSkills
Critical Thinking Problem Solving
Analysis Dissemination
RESEARCH SKILLS
Imagination
Creativity
Logical Rea...
pulling together information
AGGREGATION
CONSOLIDATING
multiple social
networking profiles
.
TO A SINGLE LOCATION
into an ...
CURATION
extracting
WEB FOUND KNOWLEDGE
bringing value
& order
to the learning
RESEARCH SKILLS
MEDIA
LITERACY
MEDI
Aadequately prepare
students to engage
in meaningful
DIALOGUEacross
multiple media
PLATFORMS
LITERACY
MEDIA LITERACYMEDIALITERACY
The VALUE of
DISTINGUISHES THE INDIVIDUAL
as a self motivated learner
who is capable in organi...
MEDIA LITERACY
understanding
the differencesbetween
open source& open access
skills of inquiry & self-expression
MEDIALITE...
LEARNING
asset communities
built around shared experiences
MEDIA LITERACYOPEN ACCESSUSING DIGITAL MEDIA
Selecting tools fo...
MEDIA LITERACY
OPEN SOURCEREMIXING DIGITAL MEDIA
LEARNING
communities
built around CREATIVE CHANGES
and RE-USE of digital ...
Collective Intelligence
new ways of understanding
ideas, knowledge, people, &
perspectives.
Collective OPEN
AUTHORSHIP
Nee...
INFORMATION
ETHICS
INFORMATION ETHICSOPYRIGHT
FAIR USE
BEST PRACTICES
interpreting
the copyright
doctrine
UNDERSTANDING RESPONSIBILITIES
use,...
INFORMATION ETHICS
OPYRIGHT
THE DIGITAL FOOTPRINT
INFORMATION ETHICSSECURITY
PRIVACY
a digital reputation starts the 1ST day you publish digital conte...
SECURITY & PRIVACY
DECICIVE
LITERACY
21ST CENTURY SKILLS DECISIVE LITERACY
infusing 21st century skills into education
Master Core Content
Think Critically
Lea...
DECISIVE LITERACY
LEARNING
STRATAGIES
APPROACHTOLEARNING
usinginformation
LEARNINGSTRATAGIES
TEST knowledge through EXPERIENCE
EXPEDITION FOR LEARNING
CLARIFY EXPERIENCE
MAKING A CHOICE between AL...
DECISIVE LITERACY
KNOWLEDGEBEHAVIORS
Selecting PROPER Learning STRATEGIES
think about a task
meet shared goals
engage in s...
DECISIVE LITERACY
KNOWLEDGEBEHAVIORS
Life and Career Skills
• Flexibility & Adaptability
• Initiative & Self-Direction
• S...
DECISIVE LITERACY
KNOWLEDGEBEHAVIORS
develop positive attitudes and beliefs
STRONG ACADEMIC MINDSET
engagement
positive
at...
DEVELOPING
AGrowthMindset
CULTUREFORLEARNING
Changing the Way the World Learns
TEACHERS AS DESIGNERS OF LEARNING
DECISIVE LITERACY
skill sets needed for
independent literacy
& application
academic vocabulary development
DEEPLEARNINGPUR...
DECISIVE LITERACYDEEPLEARNING
Changing the Way the World Learns
INPUT
Stimulus
OUTPUT
Response
FOCUS ON OBSERVABLEBEHAVIOR
Teaching & Learning Behavior
is a managed process of strengthen...
Effect Size
Feedback 0.73
Teacher-Student Relationships 0.72
Mastery Learning 0.58
Challenge of Goals 0.56
Peer Tutoring 0...
SINGLE most INFLUENCE on
ACHIEVEMENT is FEEDBACK
• Quality feedback is needed
• Feedback is to be valued
• Growth Mindsets...
FACILITATED
meta-cognitive
DEVELOPMENT
ELABORATIVE
Collaborative
EXTENDED
LEARNING
LEARNING
Application
FOCUSONOBSERVABLE LEARNING
Teaching & Learning Partnership
learning outcomes shift from teacher to le...
Changing the Way the World Learns
ASSESSMENT & LEARNING ANALYTICS
the driver of the teaching and learning process
MEASURESprogress
of individual goals
force...
ZONE PROXIMAL DEVELOPMENTLEVELOFCHALLENGE
LEVEL OF COMPETENCE
What the learner can currently
achieve independently
What th...
META COGNITIVE
Synthesizing learning data
ALLOWS teachers to make
COMPLEX DECISIONS on HOW TO
CONSTRUCT meta cognitive
INT...
@digitalsandbox1
CLASSROOMS
WALLS
without
Disruptive Innovations in Education
Disruptive Innovations in Education
Disruptive Innovations in Education
Disruptive Innovations in Education
Disruptive Innovations in Education
Disruptive Innovations in Education
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Disruptive Innovations in Education

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Since 1960 and throughout the 90's education has witnessed incremental changes in public policy that has ranged from improved practices to big government presidential initiatives starting with Johnston, Regan, Clinton, Bush, and Obama. What may be missing in these incremental changes to improve education are the disruptive technology innovations that have occurred over time when education policy makers were conversing on the ideas of accountability through federal support structures. These were the disruptive innovations that were occurring within society; the technology innovations responsible for the first transistor radio, home computer, and internet. The same disruptive innovations creating a global telecommunication network that encouraged imagination and began to customize individual learning from Web 1.0 (read and write web) to the construction of Web 2.0 (social networks) of share and share alike resources.

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  • There are several areas where new learning agents can develop skills and practices that will contribute to developing a robust set of narratives about teaching and learning. The first agent is Transliteracy, the ability to understand and communicate—to be "literate"—across all communications platforms, from sign language and speaking, to reading and writing, to the mass media, to digital communication and social networking. Unfortunately until those dialogues become reality in practice their will be a continued friction between the participatory culture and traditional education institutions. Mimi Ito, in Living and Learning with New Media (2009) summarizes these dialogue by stating that, "Participation in the digital age means more than being able to access serious online information and culture. Youth could benefit from educators being more open to forms of experimentation and social exploration that are generally not characteristic of educational institutions." (p2). These statements support the importance of Transliteracy
    http://education-2020.wikispaces.com/Disruptive+Innovation
  • Transliteracy can be a bridge between teachers and students because it doesn’t pit one medium against another. It is also a necessary strategy for developing young adults who can participate in a broader civic and economic society that “talks” in more languages than the written word. Additionally, use of the term digital native often neglects class differences associated with the digital divide and the participation gap associated with the social and cultural participatory practices afforded in new digital media.

    The new challenge for education is in information consumption as literacy is redefined through connected learning experiences and in ways that students access the vast warehouses of digital content. This process is what defines transliteracy: the set of skills needed to collaboratively collect information from multiple sources, decipher and reduce shared information into segments of exactness, and reshape information into multimedia products that become new ideas with deeper meaning.

    Transliteracy focuses specifically on “social skills and cultural competencies”39 associated with various media and how they change as one moves across media. Thomas explains transliteracy, that it is important to reach across history to include pre-digital media as part of a dynamic media ecology, thus offering a way to bring the generations together.
  • Deeper learning requires a broader range of conscious learning behaviors from students than traditional schoolwork. They must accept responsibility for expending the time and energy necessary to think about a task, select the proper learning strategies, and judge how well those strategies are working. When students encounter difficulty or setbacks, deeper learning requires that they diagnose the type of difficulty they are facing, select appropriate strategies to resolve the difficulty, and continue forward toward their learning goal. In addition, deeper learning expects students to be able to meet shared goals with others as well as to engage in the self-reflection necessary to continue learning throughout their lives.
  • Life and Career Skills
    Today’s life and work environments require far more than thinking skills and content knowledge. The ability to navigate the complex life and work environments in the globally competitive information age requires students to pay rigorous attention to developing adequate life and career skills, such as:
    • Flexibility and Adaptability
    • Initiative and Self-Direction
    • Social and Cross-Cultural Skills
    • Productivity and Accountability
    • Leadership and Responsibility
  • Deeper learning requires students to develop positive attitudes and beliefs about themselves in relation to academic work. Academic mindsets are the motivational components that influence students’ engagement in learning. In turn, engagement in deeper learning reinforces positive academic mindsets. Students with strong academic mindsets readily put in effort to learn and persist in the face of difficulty. They make use of cognitive, metacognitive, and self-regulatory strategies because they care about learning and are purposeful in doing what is required to succeed.
  • There are differences in schools where teachers aim to select talent for different pathways (such as schools with tracking) compared with those where achievement cultures aim to develop talent in each child.
    The biggest effects on student learning occurs when teachers become learners of their own learning and when students become their own teachers.
  • A Structure for Distributed Learning: Social capital platform design is essential for keeping large decentralized learning communities connected and active. As education leaves institutions
    and locates in exstitutions and becomes integrated in online spaces, social capital will be an important form of trust and reputation holding learning systems and communities together.
  • There are several areas where new learning agents can develop skills and practices that will contribute to developing a robust set of narratives about teaching and learning. Deep learning design is a process that engages students in purposeful real world learning through the construction of complex task, authentic essential questions and specifically designed scaffolding for deep learning opportunities.



    http://education-2020.wikispaces.com/Disruptive+Innovation
  • Digital learning design is a process that engages students in purposeful real world learning through the construction of complex task, authentic essential questions and specifically designed scaffolding for deep learning opportunities.
  • The new standards require that students read more challenging texts and engage in close reading lessons, which rereading is a feature to literacy. In other words content may not be as important in coverage thinking as the need to help students obtain the deep learning skill sets needed for independent literacy and application. The shift toward complex text requires practice, support through purposeful close reading. The complexity of a text is determined by a number of factors, including syntax and vocabulary. To understand complex materials, students need support in developing literacy skills in key academic vocabulary and purposeful reading.
  • Self-directed learning (which i s often the bulk of our learning—we are constantly pursuing subject matter and knowledge which is of personal interest or related to our competence in our work places) is viewed as being too
    loose.44

    Transmission Learning is based on traditional views. The learner i s brought into a system, and through lectures and courses, i s exposed to structured knowledge. This domain i s useful for building core knowledge
    elements of a field or discipline. The model, however, i s expensive to implement (one instructor, twenty students) and i s at odds with how much of our learning happens (social, two-way, ongoing).
  • Disruptive Innovations in Education

    1. 1. and the way the way the world learns. CLASSROOMS WALLS without
    2. 2. Changing the Way the World Learns
    3. 3. INCREMENTAL IMPROVING EXISTING Process & Services INNOVAT ION
    4. 4. INNOVAT IONORIGINAL IDEASThat have value IMPLEMENT ING Used by a significant number of people DISRUPTIVE
    5. 5. THE NEW Learning AGENT S & DISRUPTIVE
    6. 6. THE NEW AGEN OF LEARNING Framing a dialogue about new roles and functions for supporting learning in a new environment.
    7. 7. Learning Activators Learning Analytics Participatory Learning Transliteracy Deep Learning Design
    8. 8. Changing the Way the World Learns
    9. 9. Bridging THE GENERA TION GA P Reaching across history to include pre-digital media social skills cultural competencies
    10. 10. TRANSLITER ACY NEW WAYS OF KNOWING innovative skills & practices moving across media & modes of creation
    11. 11. CHALLEN GES new ways of communicating ASSUMPTIONS about the language of learning DOMINANCE of text-based learning, INNOVATI ON
    12. 12. TEACHING TRANSLITERATE TRANSLITERATE DISJUNCTURE Between Text-based and
    13. 13. Changing the Way the World Learns
    14. 14. RECONCILING The Language of School & Youth MEDIA LITERA CY RESEAR CH SKILLS DECISIV E LITERA CY INFORMAT ION ETHICS Open Access Using Digital Media Open Source Remixing Digital Media Information Accessing Aggregation Curation Knowledge Strategies Learning Behaviors Copyright Security Privacy
    15. 15. RESEARCH SKILLS
    16. 16. Fluency Digital Information for finding digital information RESEARCH SKILLS SKILLS to use specialized TOOLS
    17. 17. What information am I looking for? How good is the Information? Where will I find the information? How will I get there? How will I ethically use the information? RESEARCH SKILLS
    18. 18. Web 2.0 Internet Information Has Changed RESEARCH SKILLS ABILITY TO SEARCH for correct information KNOWING HOW TO ACCESS& REDUCEDIGITAL INFORMATION
    19. 19. ResearchSkills Critical Thinking Problem Solving Analysis Dissemination RESEARCH SKILLS Imagination Creativity Logical Reasoning Reflection Data Collection Analysis Imagination Creativity Conceptual Providing Evidence Application New Models
    20. 20. pulling together information AGGREGATION CONSOLIDATING multiple social networking profiles . TO A SINGLE LOCATION into an outline view of a selected topic RESEARCH SKILLS
    21. 21. CURATION extracting WEB FOUND KNOWLEDGE bringing value & order to the learning RESEARCH SKILLS
    22. 22. MEDIA LITERACY
    23. 23. MEDI Aadequately prepare students to engage in meaningful DIALOGUEacross multiple media PLATFORMS LITERACY
    24. 24. MEDIA LITERACYMEDIALITERACY The VALUE of DISTINGUISHES THE INDIVIDUAL as a self motivated learner who is capable in organizing his or her own learning PERSONAL LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS
    25. 25. MEDIA LITERACY understanding the differencesbetween open source& open access skills of inquiry & self-expression MEDIALITERACY
    26. 26. LEARNING asset communities built around shared experiences MEDIA LITERACYOPEN ACCESSUSING DIGITAL MEDIA Selecting tools for content delivery, discussion, & the integration of shared learning experiences.
    27. 27. MEDIA LITERACY OPEN SOURCEREMIXING DIGITAL MEDIA LEARNING communities built around CREATIVE CHANGES and RE-USE of digital resources. Using CREATIVE TOOLS to develop RESOURCES
    28. 28. Collective Intelligence new ways of understanding ideas, knowledge, people, & perspectives. Collective OPEN AUTHORSHIP Need for New Skills Emerge MEDIA LITERACY
    29. 29. INFORMATION ETHICS
    30. 30. INFORMATION ETHICSOPYRIGHT FAIR USE BEST PRACTICES interpreting the copyright doctrine UNDERSTANDING RESPONSIBILITIES use, & build upon a work created CREATIVE COMMONS RIGHT TO SHARE
    31. 31. INFORMATION ETHICS OPYRIGHT
    32. 32. THE DIGITAL FOOTPRINT INFORMATION ETHICSSECURITY PRIVACY a digital reputation starts the 1ST day you publish digital content Security & privacy should be taught & practiced in every connected classroom.
    33. 33. SECURITY & PRIVACY
    34. 34. DECICIVE LITERACY
    35. 35. 21ST CENTURY SKILLS DECISIVE LITERACY infusing 21st century skills into education Master Core Content Think Critically Learn How to Learn PARTNERSHIP FOR DEEPER LEARNING COMPETENCIES Work Collaboratively Communicate Effectively Academic Mindset
    36. 36. DECISIVE LITERACY LEARNING STRATAGIES APPROACHTOLEARNING usinginformation
    37. 37. LEARNINGSTRATAGIES TEST knowledge through EXPERIENCE EXPEDITION FOR LEARNING CLARIFY EXPERIENCE MAKING A CHOICE between ALTERNATIVES Development of LOGIC & IMAGINATION APPRECIATION FOR CONNECTEDNESS DECISIVE LITERACY
    38. 38. DECISIVE LITERACY KNOWLEDGEBEHAVIORS Selecting PROPER Learning STRATEGIES think about a task meet shared goals engage in self-reflection
    39. 39. DECISIVE LITERACY KNOWLEDGEBEHAVIORS Life and Career Skills • Flexibility & Adaptability • Initiative & Self-Direction • Social & Cross-Cultural Skills • Productivity & Accountability • Leadership & Responsibility abilitytonavigate COMPLEXWORKENVIRONMENTS
    40. 40. DECISIVE LITERACY KNOWLEDGEBEHAVIORS develop positive attitudes and beliefs STRONG ACADEMIC MINDSET engagement positive attitudes beliefs
    41. 41. DEVELOPING AGrowthMindset CULTUREFORLEARNING
    42. 42. Changing the Way the World Learns
    43. 43. TEACHERS AS DESIGNERS OF LEARNING
    44. 44. DECISIVE LITERACY skill sets needed for independent literacy & application academic vocabulary development DEEPLEARNINGPURPOSEFUL READING read challenging texts LITERACY SKILLS
    45. 45. DECISIVE LITERACYDEEPLEARNING
    46. 46. Changing the Way the World Learns
    47. 47. INPUT Stimulus OUTPUT Response FOCUS ON OBSERVABLEBEHAVIOR Teaching & Learning Behavior is a managed process of strengthening responses. Traditional BLACK BOX Education
    48. 48. Effect Size Feedback 0.73 Teacher-Student Relationships 0.72 Mastery Learning 0.58 Challenge of Goals 0.56 Peer Tutoring 0.55 Expectations 0.43 Homework 0.29 Aims & Policies of the School 0.24 Ability Grouping 0.12 INFLUENCESon student learning John Hattie 1999-2009 – research from 180,000 studies covering almost every method of innovation
    49. 49. SINGLE most INFLUENCE on ACHIEVEMENT is FEEDBACK • Quality feedback is needed • Feedback is to be valued • Growth Mindsets welcome feedback • Oral feedback is more effective POWERFUL FEEDBACK is from the STUDENT to the TEACHER
    50. 50. FACILITATED meta-cognitive DEVELOPMENT ELABORATIVE Collaborative EXTENDED LEARNING
    51. 51. LEARNING Application FOCUSONOBSERVABLE LEARNING Teaching & Learning Partnership learning outcomes shift from teacher to learners. STUDENT CENTERED EducationFEEDBACK FEEDBACK STUDENT Learning Goals Student Learning Goals REFLECTIVE STUDENT Learning Goals
    52. 52. Changing the Way the World Learns
    53. 53. ASSESSMENT & LEARNING ANALYTICS the driver of the teaching and learning process MEASURESprogress of individual goals forces important questions about individual learning with reflective statements being applied THE HOW ABOUT KNOWLEDGE
    54. 54. ZONE PROXIMAL DEVELOPMENTLEVELOFCHALLENGE LEVEL OF COMPETENCE What the learner can currently achieve independently What the learner will be able to achieve independently Scaffolding occurs through the support of the more knowing other.
    55. 55. META COGNITIVE Synthesizing learning data ALLOWS teachers to make COMPLEX DECISIONS on HOW TO CONSTRUCT meta cognitive INTERVENTIONS before the term of a goal expires into new knowledge INTERVENTIONS purpose in COLLECTING DATA, information, and knowledge
    56. 56. @digitalsandbox1 CLASSROOMS WALLS without

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