A Mindset for School Improvement

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to make long term changes on a large-scale we must be a part of a systematic change where all parts of the planning process is focused on the whole instead of in fragmentation.

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  • WHAT IS SCHOOL CULTURE AND CAN IT BE DEVELOPED? A school’s culture is one of the most difficult to describe and yet one of the most important elements in its success or failure in educating its students.
  • Culture is made up from values, attitudes, beliefs, and customs. When a vision taps into the sum of all four of these perceptions then change has an opportunity to thrive through focused leadership.
  • can most nearly be described as the sum of all perceptions and emotions attached to the school, both good and bad, held by students, faculty, administrators, parents, and the community at large.
  • Climate refers to the emotional atmosphere we generate around us; some people refer to climate as the “context” of school.Climate involves the perception of stakeholders concerning the fairness, openness, friendliness, the ethos of caring, and sense of welcome of the school.Climate includes the level of orderliness of the school and the degree of satisfaction experienced within its organizational structure.
  • First Driving Question: What do we know about school improvement?
  • First Driving Question: What do we know about school improvement?We knew that to make long term changes on a large-scale we must be a part of a systematic change where all parts of the planning process is focused on the whole instead of in fragmentation. (Michael Fullan)
  • Third Driving Question: What would be a key element in developing a culture of success?
  • Second Driving Question: What do we know about student learning?
  • Third Driving Question: What would be a key element in developing a culture of success?Individually and collectively we had to understand the difference between a fixed mindset and a growth mindset . (Carol Dweck)
  • Schools who hold Fixed Mindset beliefs think that “they are the way they are”, but that doesn’t mean that they have less of a desire for a positive self-image than anyone else.
  • A school can be influenced through the external forces that create a climate for a fixed mindset. A fixed mindset climate or perception that makes teachers believe in their basic qualities, like their intelligence or talent, are simply fixed traits. These fixed mindset external forces usually spend time documenting school improvement initiatives instead of developing individual talent.
  • These external forces may unknowingly strive to make others believe that the lack of talent will drive individual efforts to create success. Unknowingly these external forces affect a fixed climate mindset by using data to initiate a need for improvement.
  • I am wrong You are Right (You’re incorrect that is why my idea is better.)You’re Right I Need to Improve Blame it On Students not MeOptimist Without a Cause
  • I am wrong You are Right (You’re incorrect that is why my idea is better.)You’re Right I Need to Improve Blame it On Students not MeOptimist Without a Cause
  • I am wrong You are Right (You’re incorrect that is why my idea is better.)You’re Right I Need to Improve Blame it On Students not MeOptimist Without a Cause
  • I am wrong You are Right (You’re incorrect that is why my idea is better.)You’re Right I Need to Improve Blame it On Students not MeOptimist Without a Cause
  • Fixed & Growth Mindsets: There are also differences in classes where teachers believe that achievement (and intelligence) is difficult to change because it is fixed and innate compared to teachers who believe achievement (and intelligence) is changeable (Carol Dweck 2006).
  • Schools who have a Growth Mindset believe in continual school improvement. Individuals within the school work as a team to solve problems and school improvement is based on reliable data that drives professional development. This leads to the desire to continually improve through clearly articulated goals.
  • Schools who have a Growth Mindset believe in continual school improvement. Individuals within the school work as a team to solve problems and school improvement is based on reliable data that drives professional development. This leads to the desire to continually improve through clearly articulated goals.
  • There are differences in schools where teachers aim to select talent for different pathways (such as schools with tracking) compared with those where achievement cultures aim to develop talent in each child.
  • First, we had to embrace challenges, because we knew that students would benefit from our efforts in helping them reach their full potential.
  • The culture and climate of a school had been affected by factors from disciplinary problems and classroom rowdiness to educator pessimism or student apathy.
  • Teachers began to believe that their role is that of a change agent – that all students can learn and progress, that achievement for all is changeable and not fixed. What we found to be powerful and effective is that every day we strived to demonstrate to all students that teachers care about their learning.
  • Recognizing obstacles meant looking at how the school was viewed by the community.
  • We established a building leadership team (BLT) and site council to solve problems for school improvement that was based on reliable data that would drive professional development and student centered learning. The building leadership team provided the guidance and desired direction to continually improve through establishment of clearly articulated student centered goals.
  • How Did We Approach the Obstacles (Student Advocacy)We strived every day to develop a warmer socio-emotional climate in our classrooms, fostering student effort and thus engagement for all students. This required that teachers entered the classroom with certain conceptions about progress, relationships and students.
  • Effort is seen not as something useless to be avoid but as necessary to grow and master useful skills.
  • STUDENT IMPROVEMENTSBy holding daily team meetings centered on student improvements and setbacks, teachers and staff were able to compare notes on what was working when it came to at risk students and where improvement was needed.
  • As a school we successfully made a stand against violence, gang related behavior and bullying by initiating a “a school wide behavioral gang and bully intervention plan. This gave the students and teachers the opportunity to unite in an effort to improve their school. Rules and expectations were taught, modeled, and coached by all teachers in a schoolRules were consistently and ethically enforced by all adults on campus all of the timeStudent behavior was positively normed when the staff worked together to create an ethos of fairness
  • Criticism was viewed as a mindset for development and was integrated within the school improvement process. Collaboratively we recognized our own need for improvement through reflective data and nothing was taken personally. Negative feedback was not perceived as being directly targeted at the school but associated as a device to demonstrate our abilities.
  • How Did We Approach Criticism Create an enthusiasm among staff to work together.Identify, prioritize, and selected an issue to address using a whole group process.Gain consensus among staff for the interpretation of the selected issue.Identify specific practices to teach, coach, model, and enforce the issue.Determine desired outcomes and ways we would note progress.
  • We must recognized that every word sends a message.
  • To celebrate our ongoing success we sent out a message that everyone was important and that no one would be left behind. Our focus was on the success of others which became our source of inspiration
  • We made a commitment to positive interaction by recognizing that every word and action by teachers sent to a student sends a message of growth.We created positive relationships with our students through the continuous recognition of their appropriate behaviors.Overtly we taught each student what is expected of them in every classroom situation.
  • A Mindset for School Improvement

    1. 1.  described as the sum of all perceptions & emotions attached to the school, both good & bad, held by students, faculty, administrators, parents, & the community at large.
    2. 2. What do we know about
    3. 3. We knew that to make long term changeson a large-scale we all must be part of asystematic change where all parts of theplanning process isfocused on thewhole instead of infragmentation.(Michael Fullan)
    4. 4. The biggest effects on student learning occurswhen teachers become learners of their ownlearning and when students become their ownteachers.We found that to obtain mastery of a goalfeedback must be given and sought as teachersand students are engaged in learning. Influences on student learning John
    5. 5. What do we know about
    6. 6. What do we know about
    7. 7. Individually andcollectively understandthe difference betweena fixed mindset and agrowth mindset .(Carol Dweck)
    8. 8. Data Is Not More A climate that Important makes teachers believe in their basic qualities as fixed traits  external forces that spend time documenting schoolThan Developing improvement initiatives instead ofIndividual Talent developing individual talent
    9. 9.  strive to makeDo Not Use Data As others believe that the lack of talent will drive individual efforts to create success  influence a fixed climate mindset by using data toExternal Motivators initiate a need for improvement.
    10. 10. I am wrong you are right
    11. 11. You’re Right I Need to Improve
    12. 12. Blame it onstudents not me
    13. 13. We determined that there aredifferences in classes where teachersbelieve that achievement (andintelligence) is difficult to changebecause it is fixed and innatecompared to teachers who believeachievement (and intelligence) ischangeable (Carol Dweck 2006).
    14. 14. Success Embrace is Challenges Inspiration Criticism RecognizingMeans Change Obstacles It Takes Effort to Grow
    15. 15.  believe in continual Success Embrace school improvement is Challenges Inspiration work as a team to solve problems Improvement is based on reliable data that Criticism Recognizing Means Change Obstacles drives professional development It Takes Effort to Grow
    16. 16. There are differences in schools whereteachers aim to select talent for differentpathways (such as schools with tracking)compared with those where achievementcultures aim to develop talent in eachchild.
    17. 17. Success is Embrace Inspiration Challenges Criticism RecognizingMeans Change Obstacles It Takes Effort to Grow
    18. 18. The culture andclimate of a schoolcan be affected byfactors fromdisciplinary problems and classroomrowdiness to educator pessimism orstudent apathy.
    19. 19.  Believe that all students can learn Believe that achievement for all is changeable Demonstrated to all students that they care about their learning
    20. 20. Success Embrace is Challenges Inspiration CriticismMeans Change Recognizing Obstacles It Takes Effort to Grow
    21. 21. Recognizing obstacles means looking at how the school is viewed by the community
    22. 22. Established a buildingleadership team (BLT)and site council toHELP solve problems forschool improvement thatis based on reliable datathat will driveprofessional developmentand student centeredlearning.
    23. 23.  Develop a warm socio-emotional climate in classrooms Foster student effort Improve conceptions about progress, & student relationships
    24. 24. Success Embrace is Challenges Inspiration Criticism RecognizingMeans Change Obstacles It Takes Effort to Grow
    25. 25.  Center team meetings on student improvement allow teachers and staff to compare notes on what is working when it comes to At Risk Students
    26. 26.  Make a stance against violence, gang related behavior and bullying Rules and expectations are taught, modeled, and coached Rules are consistently and ethically enforced Behavior is positively normed
    27. 27. Success Embrace is Challenges Inspiration Criticism Recognizing ObstaclesMeans Change It Takes Effort to Grow
    28. 28.  Criticism is a mindset for development Criticism is integrated within the school improvement process Establish a means for improvement through reflective data
    29. 29.  Work together Prioritize, and selected an issue Gain consensus among staff for interpretation Identify specific practices to teach Determine desired outcomes
    30. 30. Success Embrace Challengesis Inspiration Criticism RecognizingMeans Change Obstacles It Takes Effort to Grow
    31. 31.  Send out a message that everyone is important No one will be left behind. Focus on the success of others as a source of inspiration
    32. 32.  send a message of growth positive relationship with students continuous recognition of appropriate behaviors Teach each student what is expected
    33. 33. DEFINING SCHOOL CULTUREA Mindset forSchool ImprovementA Mike King Presentationhttps://twitter.com/digitalsandbox1

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