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Iste 2012 presentation 3a
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Iste 2012 presentation 3a

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ISTE 2012 Presentation

ISTE 2012 Presentation

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  • Learn about a PD model of blended learning and inquiry and discover how this transformative process can foster creativity and innovation and affect student engagement and achievement. ADD QR CODE WIKI (shortened address)
  • Learn about a PD model of blended learning and inquiry and discover how this transformative process can foster creativity and innovation and affect student engagement and achievement.
  • Some misconceptions about Canada -live in igloos – only in the winter -winter all year long – only for 8 months -last Wednesday it felt like 111 F -celsuis and metric system vs. imperial and Fahrenheit -”eh” – only comes out when we travel –look for the maple leaf -great singers of all types, many of whom love the heat of Vegas – Celine Dion, Shania Twain, Michael Buble, Beiber and Drake
  • York Region District School Board 3rd largest school board in Canada 120,000 students 11,000 staff (senior administration, administrators, support staff, clerical staff, teachers, custodians) 170 elementary schools (mostly JK-8); 31 secondary schools 18,000+ students are ELLs (~15%)
  • York Region District School Board 3rd largest school board in Canada 120,000 students 11,000 staff (senior administration, administrators, support staff, clerical staff, teachers, custodians) 170 elementary schools (mostly JK-8); 31 secondary schools 18,000+ students are ELLs (~15%)
  • Re. FDK - over 1/2 schools offering in fall 2012 Re. wireless – since January 2010 KSAs (adapted ISTE - NETS) Consultant Team -portfolios with many elements – all support literacy -professional learning communities Full Day Every Day Kindergarten All buildings are fully wireless Digital Literacy as identified district-wide goal BYOD - staff and students Knowledge, Skills and Attitudes (KSAs) Consultant Team 40 Elementary, Secondary and K-12 Teachers and Administrators Superintendent of Curriculum and Instructional Services
  • Out of context – broader thinking re. collaborative inquiry a.k.a. action research, teacher inquiry Knowledge creation Not one-size fits all learning Personalized Responsive Inquiry-based Growth mindset Incorporate timelines and blended learning opportunities into graphic (operational) 7 Characteristics of Collaborative Inquiry (mindset)
  • Relevant Student learning guides inquiry. Student learning is the anchor for the teacher inquiry process – students’ learning processes and the products of their learning form the essential material of the inquiry. Collaborative Teacher inquiry is a shared process. Although the mandate to reach every student seems simple, achieving this goal is complex. When educators work together to inquire about their students’ learning and engagement, they embrace this complexity as an opportunity for further understanding rather than something to simplify. Reflective Actions are informed by reflection. When teachers make pedagogical decisions, they necessarily reflect on students’ engagement and learning resulting from their past decisions – setting aside moments for reflection provides opportunities for teachers to share their reflections and make their thinking both more intentional and explicit. Iterative Progressive understanding grows from cycles of inquiry. The reflective process is most powerful when it cycles back, reviews and builds on each successive inquiry. Such iterative reflective work is facilitated by regular and consistent analysis of what is being learned and how. Reasoned Analysis drives deep learning. Inductive Reasoning We engage in inductive reasoning when discussing whether or not the evidence of the specific student thinking and learning is enough to draw conclusions about a general theme of what has been learned. Deductive Reasoning We engage in deductive reasoning when we consider how a widely accepted practice can be applied in a specific instance of particular students in a classroom. Abductive Reasoning We engage in abductive reasoning when we form and test a hypothesis. For example, we begin with the supposition that if student interests are incorporated into the program, then student ability to generate robust question skills will improve. We test out this hypothesis through classroom actions that incorporate student interests and examine student conversation and actions generated as a result. Adaptive Inquiry shapes practice and practice shapes inquiry. Collaborative inquiry requires thinking to be dynamic and creative as professionals seek ways to meet the needs of students. Teachers participating in collaborative inquiry continually adapt and apply knowledge and pedagogical approaches in response to their work in the classroom. Reciprocal Theory and practice connect dynamically
  • Relevant Student learning guides inquiry. Student learning is the anchor for the teacher inquiry process – students’ learning processes and the products of their learning form the essential material of the inquiry. Collaborative Teacher inquiry is a shared process. Although the mandate to reach every student seems simple, achieving this goal is complex. When educators work together to inquire about their students’ learning and engagement, they embrace this complexity as an opportunity for further understanding rather than something to simplify. Reflective Actions are informed by reflection. When teachers make pedagogical decisions, they necessarily reflect on students’ engagement and learning resulting from their past decisions – setting aside moments for reflection provides opportunities for teachers to share their reflections and make their thinking both more intentional and explicit. Iterative Progressive understanding grows from cycles of inquiry. The reflective process is most powerful when it cycles back, reviews and builds on each successive inquiry. Such iterative reflective work is facilitated by regular and consistent analysis of what is being learned and how. Reasoned Analysis drives deep learning. Inductive Reasoning We engage in inductive reasoning when discussing whether or not the evidence of the specific student thinking and learning is enough to draw conclusions about a general theme of what has been learned. Deductive Reasoning We engage in deductive reasoning when we consider how a widely accepted practice can be applied in a specific instance of particular students in a classroom. Abductive Reasoning We engage in abductive reasoning when we form and test a hypothesis. For example, we begin with the supposition that if student interests are incorporated into the program, then student ability to generate robust question skills will improve. We test out this hypothesis through classroom actions that incorporate student interests and examine student conversation and actions generated as a result. Adaptive Inquiry shapes practice and practice shapes inquiry. Collaborative inquiry requires thinking to be dynamic and creative as professionals seek ways to meet the needs of students. Teachers participating in collaborative inquiry continually adapt and apply knowledge and pedagogical approaches in response to their work in the classroom. Reciprocal Theory and practice connect dynamically
  • Relevant Student learning guides inquiry. Student learning is the anchor for the teacher inquiry process – students’ learning processes and the products of their learning form the essential material of the inquiry. Collaborative Teacher inquiry is a shared process. Although the mandate to reach every student seems simple, achieving this goal is complex. When educators work together to inquire about their students’ learning and engagement, they embrace this complexity as an opportunity for further understanding rather than something to simplify. Reflective Actions are informed by reflection. When teachers make pedagogical decisions, they necessarily reflect on students’ engagement and learning resulting from their past decisions – setting aside moments for reflection provides opportunities for teachers to share their reflections and make their thinking both more intentional and explicit. Iterative Progressive understanding grows from cycles of inquiry. The reflective process is most powerful when it cycles back, reviews and builds on each successive inquiry. Such iterative reflective work is facilitated by regular and consistent analysis of what is being learned and how. Reasoned Analysis drives deep learning. Inductive Reasoning We engage in inductive reasoning when discussing whether or not the evidence of the specific student thinking and learning is enough to draw conclusions about a general theme of what has been learned. Deductive Reasoning We engage in deductive reasoning when we consider how a widely accepted practice can be applied in a specific instance of particular students in a classroom. Abductive Reasoning We engage in abductive reasoning when we form and test a hypothesis. For example, we begin with the supposition that if student interests are incorporated into the program, then student ability to generate robust question skills will improve. We test out this hypothesis through classroom actions that incorporate student interests and examine student conversation and actions generated as a result. Adaptive Inquiry shapes practice and practice shapes inquiry. Collaborative inquiry requires thinking to be dynamic and creative as professionals seek ways to meet the needs of students. Teachers participating in collaborative inquiry continually adapt and apply knowledge and pedagogical approaches in response to their work in the classroom. Reciprocal Theory and practice connect dynamically
  • Relevant Student learning guides inquiry. Student learning is the anchor for the teacher inquiry process – students’ learning processes and the products of their learning form the essential material of the inquiry. Collaborative Teacher inquiry is a shared process. Although the mandate to reach every student seems simple, achieving this goal is complex. When educators work together to inquire about their students’ learning and engagement, they embrace this complexity as an opportunity for further understanding rather than something to simplify. Reflective Actions are informed by reflection. When teachers make pedagogical decisions, they necessarily reflect on students’ engagement and learning resulting from their past decisions – setting aside moments for reflection provides opportunities for teachers to share their reflections and make their thinking both more intentional and explicit. Iterative Progressive understanding grows from cycles of inquiry. The reflective process is most powerful when it cycles back, reviews and builds on each successive inquiry. Such iterative reflective work is facilitated by regular and consistent analysis of what is being learned and how. Reasoned Analysis drives deep learning. Inductive Reasoning We engage in inductive reasoning when discussing whether or not the evidence of the specific student thinking and learning is enough to draw conclusions about a general theme of what has been learned. Deductive Reasoning We engage in deductive reasoning when we consider how a widely accepted practice can be applied in a specific instance of particular students in a classroom. Abductive Reasoning We engage in abductive reasoning when we form and test a hypothesis. For example, we begin with the supposition that if student interests are incorporated into the program, then student ability to generate robust question skills will improve. We test out this hypothesis through classroom actions that incorporate student interests and examine student conversation and actions generated as a result. Adaptive Inquiry shapes practice and practice shapes inquiry. Collaborative inquiry requires thinking to be dynamic and creative as professionals seek ways to meet the needs of students. Teachers participating in collaborative inquiry continually adapt and apply knowledge and pedagogical approaches in response to their work in the classroom. Reciprocal Theory and practice connect dynamically
  • Relevant Student learning guides inquiry. Student learning is the anchor for the teacher inquiry process – students’ learning processes and the products of their learning form the essential material of the inquiry. Collaborative Teacher inquiry is a shared process. Although the mandate to reach every student seems simple, achieving this goal is complex. When educators work together to inquire about their students’ learning and engagement, they embrace this complexity as an opportunity for further understanding rather than something to simplify. Reflective Actions are informed by reflection. When teachers make pedagogical decisions, they necessarily reflect on students’ engagement and learning resulting from their past decisions – setting aside moments for reflection provides opportunities for teachers to share their reflections and make their thinking both more intentional and explicit. Iterative Progressive understanding grows from cycles of inquiry. The reflective process is most powerful when it cycles back, reviews and builds on each successive inquiry. Such iterative reflective work is facilitated by regular and consistent analysis of what is being learned and how. Reasoned Analysis drives deep learning. Inductive Reasoning We engage in inductive reasoning when discussing whether or not the evidence of the specific student thinking and learning is enough to draw conclusions about a general theme of what has been learned. Deductive Reasoning We engage in deductive reasoning when we consider how a widely accepted practice can be applied in a specific instance of particular students in a classroom. Abductive Reasoning We engage in abductive reasoning when we form and test a hypothesis. For example, we begin with the supposition that if student interests are incorporated into the program, then student ability to generate robust question skills will improve. We test out this hypothesis through classroom actions that incorporate student interests and examine student conversation and actions generated as a result. Adaptive Inquiry shapes practice and practice shapes inquiry. Collaborative inquiry requires thinking to be dynamic and creative as professionals seek ways to meet the needs of students. Teachers participating in collaborative inquiry continually adapt and apply knowledge and pedagogical approaches in response to their work in the classroom. Reciprocal Theory and practice connect dynamically
  • Relevant Student learning guides inquiry. Student learning is the anchor for the teacher inquiry process – students’ learning processes and the products of their learning form the essential material of the inquiry. Collaborative Teacher inquiry is a shared process. Although the mandate to reach every student seems simple, achieving this goal is complex. When educators work together to inquire about their students’ learning and engagement, they embrace this complexity as an opportunity for further understanding rather than something to simplify. Reflective Actions are informed by reflection. When teachers make pedagogical decisions, they necessarily reflect on students’ engagement and learning resulting from their past decisions – setting aside moments for reflection provides opportunities for teachers to share their reflections and make their thinking both more intentional and explicit. Iterative Progressive understanding grows from cycles of inquiry. The reflective process is most powerful when it cycles back, reviews and builds on each successive inquiry. Such iterative reflective work is facilitated by regular and consistent analysis of what is being learned and how. Reasoned Analysis drives deep learning. Inductive Reasoning We engage in inductive reasoning when discussing whether or not the evidence of the specific student thinking and learning is enough to draw conclusions about a general theme of what has been learned. Deductive Reasoning We engage in deductive reasoning when we consider how a widely accepted practice can be applied in a specific instance of particular students in a classroom. Abductive Reasoning We engage in abductive reasoning when we form and test a hypothesis. For example, we begin with the supposition that if student interests are incorporated into the program, then student ability to generate robust question skills will improve. We test out this hypothesis through classroom actions that incorporate student interests and examine student conversation and actions generated as a result. Adaptive Inquiry shapes practice and practice shapes inquiry. Collaborative inquiry requires thinking to be dynamic and creative as professionals seek ways to meet the needs of students. Teachers participating in collaborative inquiry continually adapt and apply knowledge and pedagogical approaches in response to their work in the classroom. Reciprocal Theory and practice connect dynamically
  • Relevant Student learning guides inquiry. Student learning is the anchor for the teacher inquiry process – students’ learning processes and the products of their learning form the essential material of the inquiry. Collaborative Teacher inquiry is a shared process. Although the mandate to reach every student seems simple, achieving this goal is complex. When educators work together to inquire about their students’ learning and engagement, they embrace this complexity as an opportunity for further understanding rather than something to simplify. Reflective Actions are informed by reflection. When teachers make pedagogical decisions, they necessarily reflect on students’ engagement and learning resulting from their past decisions – setting aside moments for reflection provides opportunities for teachers to share their reflections and make their thinking both more intentional and explicit. Iterative Progressive understanding grows from cycles of inquiry. The reflective process is most powerful when it cycles back, reviews and builds on each successive inquiry. Such iterative reflective work is facilitated by regular and consistent analysis of what is being learned and how. Reasoned Analysis drives deep learning. Inductive Reasoning We engage in inductive reasoning when discussing whether or not the evidence of the specific student thinking and learning is enough to draw conclusions about a general theme of what has been learned. Deductive Reasoning We engage in deductive reasoning when we consider how a widely accepted practice can be applied in a specific instance of particular students in a classroom. Abductive Reasoning We engage in abductive reasoning when we form and test a hypothesis. For example, we begin with the supposition that if student interests are incorporated into the program, then student ability to generate robust question skills will improve. We test out this hypothesis through classroom actions that incorporate student interests and examine student conversation and actions generated as a result. Adaptive Inquiry shapes practice and practice shapes inquiry. Collaborative inquiry requires thinking to be dynamic and creative as professionals seek ways to meet the needs of students. Teachers participating in collaborative inquiry continually adapt and apply knowledge and pedagogical approaches in response to their work in the classroom. Reciprocal Theory and practice connect dynamically
  • Relevant Student learning guides inquiry. Student learning is the anchor for the teacher inquiry process – students’ learning processes and the products of their learning form the essential material of the inquiry. Collaborative Teacher inquiry is a shared process. Although the mandate to reach every student seems simple, achieving this goal is complex. When educators work together to inquire about their students’ learning and engagement, they embrace this complexity as an opportunity for further understanding rather than something to simplify. Reflective Actions are informed by reflection. When teachers make pedagogical decisions, they necessarily reflect on students’ engagement and learning resulting from their past decisions – setting aside moments for reflection provides opportunities for teachers to share their reflections and make their thinking both more intentional and explicit. Iterative Progressive understanding grows from cycles of inquiry. The reflective process is most powerful when it cycles back, reviews and builds on each successive inquiry. Such iterative reflective work is facilitated by regular and consistent analysis of what is being learned and how. Reasoned Analysis drives deep learning. Inductive Reasoning We engage in inductive reasoning when discussing whether or not the evidence of the specific student thinking and learning is enough to draw conclusions about a general theme of what has been learned. Deductive Reasoning We engage in deductive reasoning when we consider how a widely accepted practice can be applied in a specific instance of particular students in a classroom. Abductive Reasoning We engage in abductive reasoning when we form and test a hypothesis. For example, we begin with the supposition that if student interests are incorporated into the program, then student ability to generate robust question skills will improve. We test out this hypothesis through classroom actions that incorporate student interests and examine student conversation and actions generated as a result. Adaptive Inquiry shapes practice and practice shapes inquiry. Collaborative inquiry requires thinking to be dynamic and creative as professionals seek ways to meet the needs of students. Teachers participating in collaborative inquiry continually adapt and apply knowledge and pedagogical approaches in response to their work in the classroom. Reciprocal Theory and practice connect dynamically
  • Out of context – broader thinking re. collaborative inquiry a.k.a. action research, teacher inquiry Knowledge creation Not one-size fits all learning Personalized Responsive Inquiry-based Growth mindset Incorporate timelines and blended learning opportunities into graphic (operational) 7 Characteristics of Collaborative Inquiry (mindset)
  • Highlight 4 quadrants – transition into “operationalized” view – a specific example
  • Highlight 4 quadrants – transition into “operationalized” view – a specific example
  • Highlight 4 quadrants – transition into “operationalized” view – a specific example
  • Highlight 4 quadrants – transition into “operationalized” view – a specific example
  • Highlight 4 quadrants – transition into “operationalized” view – a specific example
  • Here’s how you operationalize the process Here’s how you might structure the learning MAKE LOOK MORE GENERIC (remove some descriptors under process; align colours with “plan, act and share”)
  • Here’s how you operationalize the process Here’s how you might structure the learning MAKE LOOK MORE GENERIC (remove some descriptors under process; align colours with “plan, act and share”)
  • Here’s how you operationalize the process Here’s how you might structure the learning MAKE LOOK MORE GENERIC (remove some descriptors under process; align colours with “plan, act and share”)
  • Here’s how you operationalize the process Here’s how you might structure the learning MAKE LOOK MORE GENERIC (remove some descriptors under process; align colours with “plan, act and share”)
  • Here’s how you operationalize the process Here’s how you might structure the learning MAKE LOOK MORE GENERIC (remove some descriptors under process; align colours with “plan, act and share”)
  • Examples of projects using the CI cycle and blended learning Learning Commons IBL on-Line community Action Research
  • Using a specific example of the model -describe project
  • *Use action research cycle *have “mouse over” options for evidence: -questions (sample questions) -theory of action (planning) -taking action (classroom pictures) -data collection (Linoit Jersey) -data analysis (target diagram image) -sharing (show me app recordings) http://www.showme.com/sh/?h=IZufL5U
  • 30 minute mark (10:45 a.m.) – Observations, conversations and products in relation to teacher practice and student achievement Engagement Moved professional practice forward Student engagement Broader definition of the role/work of TL Using technology as tool for student and professional learning differentiating PD - beyond the "sit and get" merging of tools in learning (e.g. Adobe Connect and Ning) fosters inquiry dispositions to new learning and new tools is changing Having the TL on the bus increased the chances of sustainability! Having the TL on the bus increased the likelyhood of sustainability.
  • At the 30 MINUTE MARK Slide with triangles: -perhaps include learning goals in centre of each triangle and include the words Observations, Conversations, Products. -could each triangle evolve into a slide with findings? Student Learning Goals: Increased engagement in learning, increased achievement in a specific content area Observations: during the learning: teachers were observing increases in engagement behaviours such as time on-task, learning-focused conversations between students (partners, groups), thoughtful questions from students to teacher and to each other, continuation of the learning outside the classroom and back in again – students continued to make connections after the lesson was “over” Conversations: Teacher – student conversations – importance of teacher instructional language “Talk to me about what you are doing/thinking/seeing” - prompts that nudge students towards uncovering their understanding of concepts, help them make their thinking visible – Products: Evidence of learning that included both products (math posters, presentations, etc) and evidence from observations and conversations -resulted in more AfL – deeper understanding of learners, targeted, responsive teaching Teacher Practice Goals: Could frame the evidence of teacher practice goals into the instructional core Interaction between Content & Student: increased understanding of inquiry as both a task and a mindset to support students in uncovering the curriculum Interaction between Teacher & Student: shift In the role of teacher: teacher as facilitator: listening, prompting, gathering evidence of learning to determine instructional next steps. Interaction between Teacher & Content: teachers need a deep understanding of the curriculum in order to clearly understand what they want students to know and be able to do: impacts listening (what am I listening for?), prompting (what do I ask or say that will cause students to think about their thinking?), gathering evidence (creation of tools to track and document evidence of student learning from observations and conversations) Role of T-L : Supporting collaboration between teachers. -having the T-L as part of the learning team positions the school team to be able to continue the learning when the project money is no longer there. Experience the value of working together firsthand and seek out ways to continue the collaboration -co-learner (our students) -providing support that is responsive to the needs of the teachers (content-based, skills of inquiry, modelling teacher-student interactions that support a culture of inquiry -providing time, space & resources
  • CHANGE IMAGE – MIND MAP – ALL THREE SPEAK TO A SECTION This is what we’ve learned from our breadth of experience (reference other projects) – our inquiry into blended learning collaborative inquiry Facilitator as designers – here are the key elements of the learning that we need to include for a successful PD experience Each element influences or has a relationship to the other Personalization is more important than prescription Knowledge Mobilization -recording sessions for future reference - materials available online before and after session -social networking -available tools – use what you’ve got or leverage what is freely available (Web 2.0, Google Apps, etc.) Team Composition Considerations for timing/dates Cost (release time) Differentiated Support Blended Learning Opportunities (synchronous, asynchronous) Face to face opportunities Timing can be individualized to school teams facilitation of, and participation in, online learning looks and feels different setting up of norms use of chat box and microphone
  • INCORPORATE TOOLS into Slide 13 (Here’s what we did…)
  • Transcript

    • 1. Blended Learning Teacher Inquiry PD Model Colin Harris, Kim Stolys, Melissa Murray York Region DSB, Ontario, Canada
    • 2. Colin HarrisCurriculum Consultant Digital Literacy & Collaborative Inquiry @digitalnative Kim Stolys Curriculum Consultant Collaborative Inquiry & Assessment @kstolys Melissa Murray Curriculum Consultant K-12 School Libraries & Inquiry-Based Learning @cool_mip
    • 3. Academic GoalTo share a model of blended learningcollaborative inquiry Social GoalTo begin a conversation about ideas andstrategies when planning collaborative inquiry
    • 4. QuickTime™ and a H.264 decompressorare needed to see this picture.
    • 5. York Region District School Board3rd largest school board in Canada120,000 students11,000 staff170 elementary schools (mostly JK-8); 31 secondary schools18,000+ students are ELLs (~15%)
    • 6. rd 120,000 Students 3 Largest School Board + 18,000 ELL 11,000 Staff In Canada170 Elementary Schools 31 Secondary
    • 7. Full day every All buildings day wirelessfully KindergartenKSA’sbased on ISTE-NETS 40 Member consultant team BYOD Staff and students
    • 8. Collaborative Inquiry Plan Share Act
    • 9. Relevan t Recipro Collabora cal tive 7 Characteristics ofAdaptiv Teacher Inquiry Reflecti e ve Reasone Iterative d
    • 10. Relevan t Recipro Collabora cal tive Student learning guides the inquiryAdaptiv Reflecti e ve Reasone Iterative d
    • 11. Relevan t Recipro Collabora cal tive Teacher inquiry is a shared processAdaptiv Reflecti e ve Reasone Iterative d
    • 12. Relevan t Recipro Collabora cal tive Actions are informed by reflectionAdaptiv Reflecti e ve Reasone Iterative d
    • 13. Relevan t Recipro Collabora cal tive Progressive understanding grows from cycles ofAdaptiv Reflecti inquiry e ve Reasone Iterative d
    • 14. Relevan t Recipro Collabora cal tive Analysis drives deep learningAdaptiv Reflecti e ve Reasone Iterative d
    • 15. Relevan t Recipro Collabora cal tive Inquiry shapes practice and practice shapesAdaptiv Reflecti inquiry e ve Reasone Iterative d
    • 16. Relevan t Recipro Collabora cal tive Theory and practice connect dynamicallyAdaptiv Reflecti e ve Reasone Iterative d
    • 17. Collaborative Inquiry Plan Share Act
    • 18. Clarifyin g Vision Collaborative Develop ActionSharing Inquiry Plan Cycle Data Analysis
    • 19. Clarifyin g Vision Identify a focus Develop Develop a theory of actionSharing Action Plan Develop a question Connect to existing research Data Analysis
    • 20. Clarifyin g Vision Establish learning goals Establish success criteria DevelopSharing ActionCreate a data-collection plan Plan Take action Data Analysis
    • 21. Clarifyin g Vision Collect achievement data DevelopSharing Action Collect reflective data Plan Analyze data Data Analysis
    • 22. Clarifyin g Vision Summarize research findings DevelopSharing Action Share with others Plan Plan future action Data Analysis
    • 23. Process Facilitation Begin with the end in mind Full-day (central location) Face-to-face Clarifyin g Vision Co-planning, co-teaching, Full-day (school sites) co-debriefing, co-reflecting Face-to-faceSharin Action g Plan Cross-team sharing, reviewing data collection On-line plan Data Analysi Half-day (central location) s Analyzing data Face-to-face Reflective journal On-line Summarizing and Sharing Half-day (central location) Face-to-face
    • 24. Process Facilitation Begin with the end in mind Full-day (central location) Face-to-face Clarifyin g Vision Co-planning, co-teaching, Full-day (school sites) co-debriefing, co-reflecting Face-to-faceSharin Action g Plan Cross-team sharing, reviewing data collection On-line plan Data Analysi Half-day (central location) s Analyzing data Face-to-face Reflective journal On-line Summarizing and Sharing Half-day (central location) Face-to-face
    • 25. Process Facilitation Begin with the end in mind Full-day (central location) Face-to-face Clarifyin g Vision Co-planning, co-teaching, Full-day (school sites) co-debriefing, co-reflecting Face-to-faceSharin Action g Plan Cross-team sharing, reviewing data collection On-line plan Data Analysi Half-day (central location) s Analyzing data Face-to-face Reflective journal On-line Summarizing and Sharing Half-day (central location) Face-to-face
    • 26. Process Facilitation Begin with the end in mind Full-day (central location) Face-to-face Clarifyin g Vision Co-planning, co-teaching, Full-day (school sites) co-debriefing, co-reflecting Face-to-faceSharin Action g Plan Cross-team sharing, reviewing data collection On-line plan Data Analysi Half-day (central location) s Analyzing data Face-to-face Reflective journal On-line Summarizing and Sharing Half-day (central location) Face-to-face
    • 27. Process Facilitation Begin with the end in mind Full-day (central location) Face-to-face Clarifyin g Vision Co-planning, co-teaching, Full-day (school sites) co-debriefing, co-reflecting Face-to-faceSharin Action g Plan Cross-team sharing, reviewing data collection On-line plan Data Analysi Half-day (central location) s Analyzing data Face-to-face Reflective journal On-line Summarizing and Sharing Half-day (central location) Face-to-face
    • 28. IBL Online Communi tyLearnin Action g ResearCommo ch ns
    • 29. Resources Critical Thinking Consortium Inquiry-based learning Schools Learning Commons Boxwood P.S. (East) Jersey P.S. (North) R.L. Graham (North) Oak Ridges P.S. (Central) Question of Inquiry •How can we increase student achievement and engagement through inquiry-based learning? 1.In what ways does collaboration between the teacher-librarian and the classroom teacher support this learning? Observation School teams s (3 teachers/team) L@S teacher Teacher-Librarian (Learning Student Commons pedagogy) Achievement Student EngagementPrevious experience with Teacher Collaborative Inquiry Teacher Practice Conversation Products s
    • 30. Clarifyin g Vision Collaborative Develop ActionSharing Inquiry Plan Cycle Data Analysis
    • 31. StudentAchievement Teacher Practice Facilitator Learning
    • 32. StudentAchievement Teacher Practice Facilitator Learning
    • 33. Designing the Learning Voice Differentia and ted Knowledg Choice Support e Timin Mobilizati g on Trust F2F in the Opportuni Process ties TeamComposit Releas ion e Cost Time
    • 34. Sample tools explored by groups: • iPads • Linoit • Wikis • Evernote • Sharepoint • Google docs • Ning • Adobe Connect • Show Me • Skype
    • 35. Colin HarrisCurriculum Consultant Digital Literacy & Collaborative Inquiry @digitalnative Kim Stolys Curriculum Consultant Collaborative Inquiry & Assessment @kstolys Melissa Murray Curriculum Consultant K-12 School Libraries & Inquiry-Based Learning @cool_mip

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