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Course Syllabus

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Digital Frontiers Syllabus Final Copy Digital Frontiers Syllabus Final Copy Document Transcript

  • DIGITAL
FRONTIERS
 Business
Strategies
for
a
New
World
 IDH
3931
 
 Adam
D’Augelli
 Nikolai
De
Leo
 Hough
Graduate
School
of
Business
 Fisher
School
of
Accounting
 561‐706‐3697
 305‐310‐1826
 adaugelli@gmail.com
 nikolaideleo@gmail.com
 
 
 Class
 Office
Hours
 Monday
 1:55
–
2:45
 Monday
 2:45
–
5
PM
 Monday
and
 1:55
–
3:35
 
 
 Wednesday
 Classroom
 Little
119
 Office
 Stuzin
255
 
 Course
Website:
www.digitalfrontiersuf.com
 
 
 To
start
with
a
story
…..
(Borrowed
from
David
Gillespie’s
Digital
Strangelove) 
 Since
the
beginning
of
time,
people
have
been
inherently
social.

They
love
to
interact,
 they
love
to
discuss
and
they
love
to
tell
stories.



 (What
did
you
think
cave
drawings
were?)
 However,
over
time
the
medium
of
communication
has
evolved.

Think
about
it
‐
once
upon
a
 time
even
paper
was
impressive.


 What
has
changed?
The
answer:
Time
 Let’s
talk
Music:
 • The
gramophone
was
invented
in
1880.


 • AM
Radio
was
invented
in
1895.


 • FM
Radio
in
1933.


 Today,
all
of
these
tools
are
basically
obsolete.


 Let’s
talk
Photos:
 • The
camera
was
invented
in
1840.
 • Today,
our
phones
have
high
quality
digital
cameras
built
into
them.
 But
the
Internet
has
only
been
around
really
for
15
years
…

 Think
about
any
technology
–
are
the
same
today
15
years
after
they
were
invented?
Or
even
 40
years
after
they
were
invented?
 Don’t
confuse
growth
for
maturity.

(The
same
can
be
said
about
every
one
of
us!)
 
 At
the
end
of
the
day,
we
are
still
figuring
all
of
this
out.
 That’s
where
this
class
comes
in
….

  • Class
Overview
and
Philosophy
 
 With
the
evolution
of
the
Internet,
the
business
world
is
rapidly
changing.
However,
since
 the
 rules
 are
 changing
 everyday
 ‐
 there
 is
 very
 little
 attention
 paid
 to
 this
 in
 current
 textbooks
 or
 classrooms.
 
 This
 course
 will
 focus
 on
 how
 technology
 is
 changing
 how
 businesses
interact
with
and
influence
consumers. 
 
 Each
week
will
follow
a
similar
format:
 
 Monday:
Guest
Lecture
 Wednesday:
Discussion
about
a
case
study
occurring
today
 
 Through
active
discussion
and
interaction
with
entrepreneurs
developing
tomorrow’s
tools
 ‐
this
course
will
prepare
students
for
business
in
this
new
world.


 
 Due
 to
 the
 nature
 of
 the
 course,
 students
 will
 be
 held
 to
 a
 higher
 professional
 standard.

 Business
 Casual
 is
 required
 for
 every
 guest
 speaker.
 They
 have
 taken
 the
 time
 to
 come
 speak
to
you
and
we
expect
you
to
show
up
looking
presentable.
Grades
will
be
based
on
 involvement
 in
 class
 discussions,
 professionalism,
 and
 tangible
 results
 from
 course
 assignments.


 
 This
class
will
be
fun.

You
will
learn
more
here
than
you
will
in
any
other
business
course.

 However,
you
will
have
to
work
hard.
 
 Assignments:

 1. Blog
Posts:
Each
Friday
(due
by
11:59
p.m.)
students
will
be
responsible
for
a
blog
 post
on
the
course
website.

 2. Case
Study:
In
groups,
students
will
be
responsible
for
leading
a
discussion
 presentation
on
a
case
example
of
a
business
today
using
the
technologies
discussed
 in
class.

 3. Final
Project:
In
groups,
students
will
be
challenged
to
create
and
implement
a
Web
 2.0
marketing
plan
for
a
local
Gainesville
business.
Emphasis
will
be
on
creatively
 applying
a
variety
of
tools
to
accomplish
the
business’s
goals
–
be
it
increased
 mindshare,
awareness
or
sales!
 
 For
further
details
on
all
three
assignments
read
the
separate
assignment
sheets.
 
 We
also
may
assign
short
essays
or
quizzes
on
readings.
 We
may
not
give
lengthy
comments
on
papers;
however,
we
will
give
enough
to
tell
you
 what
to
improve.

If
you
ever
need
more
clarification,
just
ask.

  • Texts:
 
 • What
Would
Google
Do,
Jeff
Jarvis
 • Monk
and
the
Riddle,
Randy
Komisar
 • Wikinomics
–
How
Mass
Collaboration
Changes
Everything,
Don
Tapscott
 • Never
Eat
Alone,
Keith
Ferrazzi
 
 Books
are
available
at
Goering’s
Book
Store,
1717
NW
1st
Avenue
(Behind
Gator
City
and
 Tijuana
Flats),
377‐3703,
though
you
are
welcome
to
shop
around.

 Please
be
aware
that
there
will
be
a
lot
of
reading
in
this
course.
To
encourage
thorough
 and
timely
reading,
we
reserve
the
right
to
give
graded
pop
quizzes
and
essays.
 In
addition,
we
will
assign
short
online
readings.
In
this
class,
we
hope
to
make
you
familiar
 and
comfortable
with
Internet
resources
and
able
to
use
them
more
skillfully
than
the
 average
student.

 
 Course
Calendar:
 The
course
calendar
can
be
found
on
the
course
website.
It
will
be
constantly
updated
for
 speakers
and
new
developments
so
do
not
expect
a
static
calendar.

 
 ABOUT
EMAIL:

 
 • Please
choose
one
email
account
(preferably
Gatorlink)
and
use
it
throughout
the
 semester.


 • Send
work
to
us
as
a
Microsoft
Word
or
PDF
attachment
(unless
we
say
otherwise)
 by
the
deadline
we
agree
on
in
class.

 • Please
include
your
name
in
the
name
of
the
Word
file
(e.g.
adaugelliessay1.doc),
so
 we
can
find
it
easily.
 • You
must
put
a
helpful
subject
line
and
an
appropriate,
brief
cover
message
in
the
 body
of
every
email.
(Please
include
your
name
in
the
subject
line)
 
 
 

  • Course
Requirements
 
 Class
participation
will
be
a
major
portion
of
your
grade.


This
class
is
different
from
any
 other
class
at
the
University
of
Florida
because
it
requires
interactive
learning.

Reading
 about
the
speakers
before
they
attend
and
researching
their
industry
would
be
a
good
idea.

 We
want
to
see
students
asking
questions,
answering
questions,
offering
suggestions,
and
 interacting
with
other
students.

 
 You
must
complete
in‐class
work
in
class
on
the
day
we
do
it
and
may
not
make
it
up.
(If
 you
need
to
be
absent,
please
let
us
know
in
advance
or
as
soon
as
you
can,
so
we
can
keep
 you
updated.)

 
 This
course
will
make
all
accommodations
necessary
to
welcome
and
support
students
 with
disabilities,
including
those
mandated
by
the
Americans
With
Disabilities
Act
(ADA)
 and
University
policy.
Please
discuss
with
me
any
personal
circumstances
we
should
be
 aware
of.
Please
consider
this
syllabus
a
promise
of
full
compliance
with
the
University’s
 ADA
guidelines.

 
 Grading.

 
 Reflection
Papers:

 
 
 
 
 20%
of
course
grade
 
 Case
Presentation:
 
 
 
 
 20%
of
course
grade
 
 Final
Project
 
 
 
 
 
 40%
of
course
grade
 
 Participation
 
 
 
 
 
 20%
of
course
grade
 
 For
every
day
late
that
an
assignment
is
turned
in,
it
will
result
in
the
loss
of
a
letter
grade
 on
the
assignment.


 
 In
some
cases,
we
will
allow
students
to
revise
and
resubmit
work
that
is
not
passing
 quality,
as
long
as
you
do
so
quickly.
There
will
be
a
deadline.
“Quickly”
does
not
mean
 “after
the
semester
is
over.”

 
 We
reserve
the
right
not
to
offer
or
accept
a
rewrite
on
any
assignment.
In
some
cases,
the
 best
lesson
is
failure.
 

  • Final
Notes,
Warnings,
Pet
Peeves,
and
Jokes
 

 • Cell
phones:
please
turn
them
off
before
class.

 • If
an
outsider
speaker
is
in
class,
please
treat
them
with
the
utmost
respect.

These
are
 professionals
who
have
taken
their
time
to
help
you
learn
and
grow.

This
means
come
 to
class
prepared,
wearing
business
casual
and
ready
to
ask
questions.


 • In
 class,
 come
 to
 learn.
 
 That
 means:
 No
 laptops,
 text‐messaging,
 reading
 the
 paper
 or
 doing
a
crossword.

You
may
give
the
person
seated
in
front
of
you
a
shoulder
massage,
 as
long
as
you
are
discreet
and
he
or
she
(or
you)
do
not
make
any
noises.

 • Do
not
skip
class
because
you
are
20
minutes
or
an
hour
late.
Come
anyway.
But
if
your
 hair
is
freshly
gelled
and
styled,
I’ll
be
pissed
that
you
didn’t
just
put
on
a
cap
and
come
 on
time.

 • Don’t
be
20
minutes
or
an
hour
late.
If
you
are,
have
a
credible
story.
Nothing
is
sadder
 than
 a
 bad
 liar.
 Good
 liars,
 on
 the
 other
 hand,
 get
 my
 respect.
 A
 bagel
 hot
 dog
 from
 Einstein’s
or
a
burrito
will
usually
gain
forgiveness.
I’m
often
hungry
during
class.
 • Sleeping
 or
 appearing
 to
 sleep
 through
 more
 than
 50%
 of
 class
 counts
 as
 an
 absence.
 And
I
may
draw
a
mustache
on
you.
 • Don’t
take
this
class
if
you’re
not
going
to
read
the
books
fully
and
well.

 • Though
we
do
our
best
to
keep
our
political,
 social,
or
other
views
to
ourselves
unless
 they
are
directly
relevant
to
the
class,
sometimes
they
do
appear.
You
get
no
advantage
 from
 agreeing
 with
 us
 and
 no
 disadvantage
 from
 having
 a
 different
 viewpoint,
 party
 affiliation,
or
whatever.
Our
goal
is
to
help
you
express
and
back
up
your
assertions,
not
 to
impose
our
views
on
you.
I
do
not
lower
grades
for
people
who
disagree
with
me.
I
 only
do
so
if
they
disagree
with
me
on
basic
writing
principles
that
have
stood
the
test
of
 time.
 Moreover,
 I
 ask
 your
 cooperation
 in
 making
 sure
 our
 classroom
 is
 a
 welcoming
 place
for
all
viewpoints.