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Bromley Google Earth CPD
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Bromley Google Earth CPD

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  • Intro to Google Earth earth.google.com separate application to download 3D world making and sharing kml/kmz import GPS and other data
  • Intro to Google Maps maps.google.co.uk web based service 2D not 3D My Maps collaborate, embed, share, etc easier to use for pupils to add content
  • There are different levels of using Google Maps and Google Earth in the classroom. They range from the very simple using these geo products as a virtual atlas to organising enquiry based local studies into issues such as crime or the school environment. The presentation will take the audience through the different levels of what’s possible.
  • Use Google Earth to browse or search for a place relevant to the lesson. Examples: History – site of battle / event Geography – case study English – setting for a play or novel Maths – real world example of e.g. geometry
  • Use the Layers in Google Earth to explore a whole range of information. Interesting layers include historical maps, UN map of the changing environment and ancient Rome in 3D
  • The next stage on from viewing the map and viewing other people’s information is to start to produce your own. Teachers can add a variety of different items such as placemarks, paths and polygons. Teachers can also insert a range of content into the descriptions – video, photos, rich text, internet links
  • The completed maps can then be shared or embedded into a blog or website.
  • Google Earth can start to be used as a 3D gaming/scenario planning environment. Models of wind turbines can be downloaded and pupils have to decide where to place them. Pupils could work on a disaster relief plan for an earthquake affected area. This kind of lesson is ideally suited to subjects such as citizenship, geography and business studies.
  • Project maps can be made identifying issues in the school environment. This map highlighted the worst bins around the school and was shared with school leadership as part of a wider project.
  • Project maps can be made identifying issues in the school environment. This map highlighted the worst bins around the school and was shared with school leadership as part of a wider project.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Google Earth and Google Maps for Geography Keys Stages 3 and 4 Jamie Buchanan-Dunlop Director, Digital Explorer Bromley CPD network Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) 5 February
    • 2. Google Earth
    • 3. Google Maps
    • 4. Progression using Google Geo                                          Out & about                                 Problem solving                       Digital Mapmaking              Geographical Encyclopaedia      Virtual Atlas
    • 5. Virtual Atlas – Google Earth
    • 6. Encyclopaedia – Google Earth
    • 7. Mapmaking – Google My Maps
    • 8. Mapmaking – Google My Maps
    • 9. Problem solving – Google Earth
    • 10. Out & about – Google Maps
    • 11. Skills Sheet: ‘Using the 3D viewer’
      • Navigation Controls
      • Click the north-up button to reset the view so that north is at the top of the screen. Click and drag the ring to rotate your view.
      • Use the Look joystick to look around from a single vantage point, as if you were turning your head. Click an arrow to look in that direction or continue to press down on the mouse button to change your view.
      • Use the Move joystick to move your position from one place to another. Click an arrow to look in that direction.
      • Use the zoom slider to zoom in or out (+ to zoom in, - to zoom out) or click the icons at the end of the slider.
      • Keyboard shortcuts
      • Use the arrow keys to move your position around.
      • Use the SHIFT key + the left and right arrow keys to rotate your view.
      • Use the SHIFT key + the up and down arrow keys to tilt your view.
      • Mouse shortcuts
      • Hold the left mouse button down and drag to change your position.
      • Double click on a location to zoom in.
      • Hold the right mouse button down and drag up and down to zoom (or use the mouse scroll wheel).
      • Hold the right mouse button and drag left and right to rotate your view.
      1 2 3 4
    • 12. Skills Sheet: ‘Finding places’
      • Finding places
      • Searching in Google Earth is like searching using a normal search engine.
      • Type the place you are looking for in the search box (1) and press ENTER.
      • The search result will be displayed as a grey crosshairs (2) both in the viewer and in the search results section.
      • Google Earth likes certain formats for searches. You can use:
      • just the name of the country or major town
      • town and country for smaller towns (e.g. Ushuaia, Argentina)
      • full address (e.g. 1 Kensington Gore, London)
      • postcode (e.g. SW7 2AR)
      • Note: if there are many places of the same name, Google Earth is more likely to select the correct one if you have the browser positioned in the right area.
      1 2 2
    • 13. Skills Sheet: ‘Using layers’
      • Introduction to layers
      • Layers contain additional information created by Google or its content partners.
      • Layers are activated by clicking on the check boxes.
      • A ‘  ’ indicates that a layer is turned on. Click on the ‘  ’ again to turn a layer off.
      • A ‘  ’ indicates that some of the layers in a folder are turned on.
      • Layer folders can be expanded by clicking on the ‘+’ symbol next to a folder.
      • Folders can be minimised by clicking on the ‘-’ symbol.
      1 2 3 4 5
      • Popular layers
      • The layers in Google Earth are updated on a regular basis, so you will need to look at the layers panel in Google Earth for an up-to-date list.
      • Some of the useful layers are:
      • 3D Buildings – shows buildings in 3D in major cities especially in the USA and major landmarks elsewhere
      • Borders and Labels – show national and internal borders and the location and names of towns and cities
      • Weather – shows live cloud, radar and forecast information
      • Gallery – expand this folder to see layers on volcanoes, earthquakes, etc .
      • Global Awareness – expand this folder to see information created by a range of NGOs
      • Places of Interest – expand this folder to see information on hospitals, schools, geographical features, etc.
      • Terrain – switching this layer on shows the world in 3D
    • 14. Skills Sheet: ‘Opening saved placemarks’
      • Opening placemarks
      • Placemark is the name given to the points created in Google Earth. These are saved in files called kml or kmz files. These files can be saved in the same way as any other file in your ‘My Documents’, department shared area or hosted on your VLE.
      • Once you have saved them from the Geography Teaching Today website or other source, follow the steps below to open and view these resources in Google Earth.
      • Go to the ‘File’ menu and click on ‘Open’. This will open a dialogue box where you can browse for the file saved on your computer.
      • The file will appear in the ‘Temporary Places’ area at the bottom of the places panel. You may need to click on the ‘+’ symbol by the folder to see all the content.
      • Make sure that the check box is marked with a ‘  ’ to view the placemarks on the map.
      • To see the content written about one of the placemarks click on the blue writing .
      • Or click on the icon on the map.
      • To zoom in on the placemark, double click on the icon in the places panel.
      • Or double click on the icon on the map.
      1 2 3 4 5 7 6
    • 15. Skills Sheet: ‘Measuring distance’
      • Measuring distance
      • Use the Ruler tool to measure distance.
      • You can measure a straight line distance by clicking on your start point and then your end point.
      • You can also measure a path, by drawing a path (series of points).
      • The distance will be displayed in the dialogue box.
      • You can change the unit of measurement from a selection in the drop-down menu.
      1 2 3 4 5 2
    • 16. Skills Sheet: ‘Creating a placemark’
      • Creating a placemark
      • To create a new placemark, click on the drawing pin icon.
      • A drawing pin with a yellow flashing box around it will appear on the map. You can drag this to your exact location using the cursor and mouse. (Note: zoom in for greater accuracy.)
      • A dialogue box will also appear. Type a name for your placemark.
      • You can also write a description in this area, which will be displayed when you click on the icon.
      • Once you have chosen the location, name and description, click ‘OK’.
      1 2 3 4 5
      • Editing a placemark
      • Once you have created your placemark it will appear in the ‘Temporary Places’ area in the Places panel. You can edit the placemark, including changing its position:
      • Right click on the placemark name in the Places panel
      • Select ‘Properties’ at the bottom of the pop-up menu.
      7 6
    • 17. Skills Sheet: ‘Creating a path’
      • Creating a path
      • To create a new path, click on the path icon.
      • A cross-hairs will appear on your screen. Click on the next part of your path and another point will appear. (Note: use the mouse or keyboard to zoom or pan while you are drawing the path.)
      • You can also draw a continuous line. Simply hold down the left mouse button and the cross-hairs will change to an arrow, allowing you to draw a freehand path.
      • If you make a mistake you can right click and the most recent point will be deleted, or you can left click on a point (it will turn green) and you can alter its position by dragging the point.
      • A dialogue box will also appear. Type a name for your path.
      • You can also write a description in this area, which will be displayed when you click on the name of the path.
      • You can change the colour and thickness of the path using the options under the ‘Style, Color’ tab.
      • Once you have drawn the path and chosen the colour, thickness, name and description, click ‘OK’.
      • Editing a path
      • Once you have created your path it will appear in the ‘Temporary Places’ area in the Places panel. You can edit the path, including changing its position:
      • Right click on the path name in the Places panel
      • Select ‘Properties’ at the bottom of the pop-up menu.
      1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
    • 18. Skills Sheet: ‘Creating a polygon’
      • Creating a polygon
      • To create a new polygon, click on the polygon icon.
      • A cross-hairs will appear on your screen. Draw the outline of your polygon by clicking around the outside of the area. (Note: use the mouse or keyboard to zoom or pan while you are drawing the polygon.)
      • You can also draw a continuous line. Simply hold down the left mouse button and the cross-hairs will change to an arrow, allowing you to draw a freehand polygon.
      • If you make a mistake you can right click and the most recent point will be deleted, or you can left click on a point (it will turn green) and you can alter its position by dragging the point.
      • A dialogue box will also appear. Type a name for your polygon.
      • You can also write a description in this area, which will be displayed when you click on the name of the polygon.
      • You can change the fill and line colour as well as the opacity of the polygon using the options under the ‘Style, Color’ tab.
      • You can choose to make the polygon 3D by changing its altitude and extending the sides to the ground. (Note: think about using different altitudes to represent different values - see options under the ‘Altitude’ tab.)
      • Once you have drawn the path and chosen the colour, thickness, name and description, click ‘OK’.
      • Editing a polygon
      • Once you have created your polygon it will appear in the ‘Temporary Places’ area in the Places panel. You can edit the polygon, including changing its position:
      • Right click on the polygon name in the Places panel.
      • Select ‘Properties’ at the bottom of the pop-up menu.
      8 9 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
    • 19. Skills Sheet: ‘Advanced placemarks’
      • Advanced placemarks
      • You can format text and add images, video and web links to placemarks.
      • Format text as a title – add <h1> to the start and </h1> to the end of the text you want to change.
      • Add a web link – simply type in the full web address and it will automatically appear as an active link.
      • Add an image – type <img src=“ C:/Documents and Settings/My Documents/mountain.jpg ” width=“ 300 ”> The green text is the file path and name of your image (find this by right clicking on an image in your computer folders and select ‘Open with’ and then ‘Internet Explorer’. Then copy and paste the information from the address bar. The purple text is the width you want the picture in pixels.
      • Add a video – upload your video to a site such as youtube.com or schooltube.com. Then go to your video’s page, copy and paste the embed code (see above for example).
      • Hint: create line breaks between content by typing <br>
      1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 Change icons To change the icon style, colour or size click here.
    • 20. Skills Sheet: ‘Organising, saving & touring placemarks’
      • Organising Placemarks
      • To organise your placemarks, create folders by going to the ‘Add’ menu and selecting ‘Folder’ or press CTRL + SHIFT + N
      • Give your folder a new name.
      • You can add a description if you wish.
      • Click ‘OK’ when you have finished. The folder will appear in the Places panel.
      • To add placemarks to folders you can click on a placemark and drag it into the folder or use the cut and paste commands (highlight a placemark by clicking on it and pressing CTRL + X to cut and then highlight the folder and CTRL + V to paste).
      • Saving Placemarks
      • You can save a placemark like any other file on your computer.
      • Right click on the placemark or folder you wish to save
      • Select ‘Save Place As’
      • This will open a dialogue box similar to other programmes. Select the File name you would like to use. You will also see that there are two choices for ‘Save as type’ – Kml (*.kml) and Kmz (*.kmz). Choose ‘Kmz’ only if you have inserted pictures from your computer or a shared drive into the placemarks. Otherwise choose ‘Kml’.
      1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Playing a tour Once you have put all your placemarks in a folder you can tour them. Simply highlight the folder you wish to tour and press the ‘play’ button indicated. Hint: to show the information popping up during your tour you will need to go to the ‘Tools’ menu and select ‘Options’. The middle tab shows you options for touring. Make sure that the box ‘Show Balloon when tour is paused’ is checked. You can also alter the speed and pause time of the tour.
    • 21. Online resources Classroom resources KS3 - http://www.geographyteachingtoday.org.uk/ks3-resources/curriculum-opportunities/using-google-earth/ Google Earth data - http://www.kmlfactbook.org/ ESRI education – http://www.esriuk.com/schools/index.asp Mapping News - http://www.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/oswebsite/education/mappingnews/ Fieldwork Manuals – http://digitalexplorer.co.uk/resources/manuals
    • 22.
        • Download Google Earth – http://earth.google.com
        • Look at basics from GIS zone - http://mapzone.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/mapzone/giszone/english/
        • Use Google Earth layers
        • Use a Google account to access My Maps
        • Make your own map
        • Read the latest copy of Mapping News
        • Find a KS3 lesson at GTT or Juicy Geography http://www.juicygeography.co.uk/googleearth.htm
      7 things to try next week
    • 23. Have a look at the very helpful videos and guidance at http://maps.google.com/help/maps/mymaps/create.html Google Maps – map making
    • 24. Any questions?
    • 25. Keep in touch Twitter @de_updates Blog digitalexplorer.co.uk/blog Facebook facebook.com/digitalexplorer Email [email_address]