200 million reasons to be on LinkedIn
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200 million reasons to be on LinkedIn

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In an age of algorithms who you are is in part determined by your digital footprint, which means that if you network for business then you will need to do so online. ...

In an age of algorithms who you are is in part determined by your digital footprint, which means that if you network for business then you will need to do so online.

Why? Because while business is in some ways the same as it ever was (based on mutually beneficial relationships) social media has turned the way we form those relationships on its head.

You may look around and think that you (or your peers) don’t use social media and are still doing fine but this is not looking in the right direction.

Professionals need to look ahead and adapt the way they connect and communicate to keep up with this change.

One way they are doing so is on LinkedIn. Often referred to as the ‘new networking for business’ LinkedIn is not so new really, at 10 years old and with 200 million members around the world, four million in Australia.

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200 million reasons to be on LinkedIn 200 million reasons to be on LinkedIn Presentation Transcript

  • 200 million reasons to be on Linked In (& what to do when you get there) @dionnelew dionnekasianlew.com
  • In today’s age of algorithms, who you are is in part determined by your digital footprint.
  • That means that if you network for business then you will need to do so online.
  • Why?
  • Because while business is in some ways the same as it ever was, based on mutually beneficial relationships...
  • … social media has turned the way we form those relationships on its head.
  • You may look around and think that you or your peers don’t use social media and are still doing fine…
  • … but that is not looking in the right direction.
  • Almost two billion people use social media right now and that trend shows no signs of abating with predictions it will reach 2.55 billion by 2017.
  • Professionals need to look ahead & adapt the way they connect and communicate to keep up with this change.
  • One way they are doing so is on LinkedIn.
  • Often referred to as the ‘new networking for business’ LinkedIn is not so new really, at 10 years old and with 200 million members around the world.
  • But just signing up and doing nothing is like going to a networking lunch and standing in the corner.
  • You’ve got to know what to do once you are there.
  • Naturally how you use LinkedIn depends on what you want to achieve.
  • Businesses can use it to raise funds, for recruitment, job search or networking, amongst other things.
  • Whatever your goal, executives tend to have similar questions about what to do when starting out.
  • These sound familiar?
  • Should I use a photograph?
  • Yes.
  • People like to deal with people.
  • Use a recent high quality photograph.
  • Remember digital does not replace real life connection it extends it.
  • Do I have to give endorsements back?
  • No.
  • If you do, only endorse people for skills you know they have. If you mistakenly endorse someone don’t worry, you can withdraw it.
  • Pod Legal reminds us that displaying fake endorsements could get you in trouble with the law.
  • Should I give recommendations?
  • As in real life, so online.
  • Your recommendations go to your reputation so use them judiciously.
  • But where they are deserved, go ahead.
  • What do I say about myself?
  • Your 120–character headline is prime real estate so differentiate yourself.
  • There are lots of ‘senior executives’ out there.
  • Be the “not-for-profit CEO who successfully delivered a 500% increase in diabetes funding in two years.”
  • Do I share my employment history?
  • Your history provides legitimacy in particular if it comes with credible recommendations.
  • But you do not need to write War and Peace.
  • Who should I connect with?
  • As in real life…
  • … you need to build strategic connections with influencers, colleagues and potential business interests.
  • But algorithms also work out your interests and throw unknowns in your path.
  • I LOVE this.
  • But how open you are to it will depend on your personality.
  • Only connecting if there’s a potential business outcome feels a bit like pyramid selling to me.
  • I’ve met up with many people just because I found them interesting.
  • It’s enriching and I’ve made many amazing contacts as a result…
  • But that’s me … (you have to be you)
  • Should I join groups?
  • That depends…
  • Groups bring together people with strong interests and can be great for exchanging views.
  • However, some people just post links to their own content and don’t add to the community.
  • ME, ME, ME …
  • As a result, the value varies greatly.
  • If you are time poor, which most executives are, try niche groups with members who are seriously interested in a topic.
  • Can I outsource my LinkedIn engagement?
  • Would you send your assistant to a cocktail party to talk on your behalf?
  • virtual connection is a personal connection that has not yet made its way into A life (IRL). real
  • By all means get a consultant to set up, brand or teach you LinkedIn or someone to manage the administration & tactics.
  • But engagement is about the real YOU.
  • But how will I find the time?
  • Allocate an hour a week to reading but arrange for the material to be shared across the week by using scheduling tools like Bufferapp, Sprout Social or Hoot Suite.
  • You probably already read after hours and pass on articles, it’s no different.
  • The reality is that networking takes time.
  • …whether it’s having lunch or playing golf or engaging online.
  • But you do it because it’s worthwhile.
  • www.dionnekasianlew.com E: dionne@dionnekasianlew.com T: @dionnelew