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Digital Book Piracy: Let's Deal With It

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Brian Napack's Digital Book World Presentation

Brian Napack's Digital Book World Presentation
January 26, 2010

Brian Napack
President, Macmillan
http://macmillan.com

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    Digital Book Piracy: Let's Deal With It Digital Book Piracy: Let's Deal With It Presentation Transcript

    • Brian Napack President, Macmillan Digital Book World January 26, 2010 Digital Piracy Let’s deal with it
    • Digital piracy is when a digital copy of your work is taken, given away, or sold without your permission
    • Is digital piracy an issue for the book business?
    • Lehninger: Principles of Biochemistry April 2009 Big market share Winning lots of adoptions Found all over the web for free Sharp sales fall-off What was happening?
    • So piracy is happening
    • But just how bad is it?
    • Sherrilyn Kenyon on Vuze 29 search results
    • Janet Evanovich on eBay 37 eBooks for $10.99
    • New York Times Bestsellers January 24, 2010 Found on ExtraTorrent Found on DownArchive Found on Rapidshare Found on PDF-Search Engine Found on TorrentPump Found on Torrent-Downloads Found on OneBigTorrent Found on Sumotorrent Found on Picktorrent Found on Seedpeer Found on Downarchive
      • Attributor Study – January 2010
      • 9 million pirated book copies were downloaded in three months
      Verso Study – January 2010 28% of eReader owners have used file-sharing sites to download free eBooks 6% have downloaded 10 or more 45% of males 18-34 have downloaded free eBooks from file-sharing sites
    • Piracy is a really big issue for the book business
    • Can we do anything about it?
    • Piracy happens when motivation meets opportunity
      • Love of authors, genres
      • Perceived high prices
      • Lack of availability
      • Restrictive formats
      • Disdain for media co’s
      So piracy is likely to get worse, unless we can address it comprehensively Motivation More digital content More file-sharing sites Broad pirate-title availability Many pirate-ready devices Increasing ease-of-use Lack of consequence Opportunity
      • Target facilitators of piracy
      • Target pirates
      • Pursue legislation and enforcement
      • Create a viable consumer marketplace
      • Protect content in-house
      • Protect content in the marketplace
      • Engage in public education
      Macmillan’s Seven Point Plan
    • Point 1 – Target facilitators of piracy Where are books being pirated? File-hosting sites Peer-to-peer sites Auction and marketplace sites Peer sharing with personal media (email, thumb drives, etc.)
    • Point 1 – Target facilitators of piracy Where are books being pirated? Host Site Share of Piracy rapidshare.com 35.60% 4shared.com 32.70% esnips.com 7.40% uploading.com 3.70% mediafire.com 2.40% hotfile.com 2.10% megaupload.com 2.10% scribd.com 2.00% depositfiles.com 1.50%
    • Point 1 – Target facilitators of piracy Pursue takedowns and actions against sites that offer hosting, downloading, and P2P sharing Hire dedicated anti-piracy staff Employ pirates to monitor sites and perform takedowns Enlist anti-piracy services to perform manual and automated takedowns (Attributor) Work with marketplace and file-sharing sites to institute best practices – filtering, takedowns, graduated response Pursue lawsuits against sites that facilitate piracy
    • Robert Jordan – The Gathering Storm Heavily embargoed with no eBook Takedowns October 27 (Pub Date) – November 6 Takedowns
    • PC Cast – Tempted A title with persistent takedowns
    • Dan Brown – The Lost Symbol A title without takedowns (presumably)
    • Point 1 – Target facilitators of piracy Results so far 12,000 content takedowns in last six months on 297 titles (4.99 million downloads prior to takedown) Monitored titles have far less pirate activity PA launched a piracy portal that facilitates takedowns Certain share-sites instituting graduated response and filtering (e.g. Scrib’d) Successful GEMA, Wiley lawsuits against Rapidshare Numerous other successful suits (e.g. PirateBay, Grokster, Bunnell, Usenet, Fung)
    • Point 2 – Target pirates Pursue actions against individuals and companies that distribute or download pirated content Target individuals and companies that offer pirated titles on marketplace sites (e.g. eBay) Support media industry talks with ISP’s to penalize repeat offenders (e.g. Verizon, Comcast) Promote best practices among online service providers worldwide (e.g. AAP Best Practices) Pursue legal proceedings against individuals and companies that engage in wholesale piracy
    • Point 3 – Pursue legislation and enforcement Partner across IP industries to enact and enforce anti-piracy laws worldwide
      • Partner with music, movie, and software industries
      • Support legislation worldwide – France 3-Strikes, Digital Britain, Taiwan, South Korea
        • Anti-piracy legislation and enforcement being pursued in many other countries
      • Maintain dialogue with US legislators
    • Point 4 – Create a viable consumer marketplace Create easy, affordable, legal ways for people to get and use the eBooks they want on the devices they want Make eBooks available across a broad range of retailers and devices Expand and standardize collection across all platforms Support a consumer-friendly price curve Implement consumer-friendly DRM standards
    • Scans – Picture and OCR Production files Manuscripts No hacked versions of legal eBooks found to date Point 5 – Protect content in-house The most common sources of new books
    • Point 5 – Protect content in-house Ensure that content is secure throughout the publishing process Develop standards for manuscript handling: author, agent, editorial, sub-rights, publicity, composition, printers, etc. Implement in-house workflow security Implement security-solution for distributed manuscripts and review copies
    • Point 6 – Protect content in the market Ensure all copyrighted content available in digital formats is appropriately safeguarded Establish standards for rights management that protect content while not punishing the consumer Sell only through retailers and wholesalers that have appropriate DRM, terms of use, and handling standards Strictly limit free-and-open eBook giveaway programs, substituting online reading in protected environments
    • Point 7 – Engage in Public Education Encourage awareness within the industry and among consumers Develop internal program to educate editors, authors, agents, etc. Work with AAP and other IP industry associations to promote public knowledge and awareness
    • We are optimistic… … but we must all work together People have always been willing to pay for books There is an established retail model for eBooks The tools to fight piracy are better now We can learn from and partner with music, movie, and software industries
    • [email_address] AAP copyright infringement portal: http://www.aap.copyrightinfringementportal.com/ [email_address] Online piracy monitoring vendors: www.attributor.com www.cov.com/london www.baytsp.com www.peermediatech.com www.envisional.com Thank you.
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