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    Tech Plan Tech Plan Document Transcript

    • Chappaqua Central School District Technology Plan 2007–2010 Prepared by Darleen M. Nicolosi Director of Instructional Technology April 23, 2007
    • TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Acknowledgements............................................................................................ 3 District Technology Planning Team.................................................................. 4 Executive Summary .......................................................................................... 5 Planning Process ............................................................................................... 6 District Technology Vision ................................................................................ 7 Current Status .................................................................................................. 8 Goals and Objectives ....................................................................................... 19 Implementation Strategies ............................................................................. 22 Appendices....................................................................................................... 38 A. Network Diagrams ....................................................................................39 B. Blackboard Overview ................................................................................46 C. Application Software Inventory................................................................47 D. K-12 Software Evaluation –How to get new software.............................53 D. Acceptable Use Policy: K–4.......................................................................58 E. Acceptable Use Policy: 5–12......................................................................62 Page 2 of 65
    • ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Chappaqua Central School District Board of Education Janet Benton Board President Jay Shapiro Board Vice President Susan Habermann Board Member Robert Gursha Board Member Jeffrey Mester Board Member Education Center Administration Dr. David A. Fleishman Superintendent Dr. Lyn McKay Assistant Superintendent Thomas Cardellichio Assistant Superintendent John Chow Assistant Superintendent Dr. Jerry Wishner Director of Special Education Brook Pechenko, Susan Lambert, Dr. Lynn Lubow CPSE/CSE Chair Steve Young Director of Athletics Building Administration Andrew Selesnick Principal, Horace Greeley High School Martin Fitzgerald Principal, Robert E. Bell Middle School Donna Raskin Principal, Seven Bridges Middle School Dr. Michael Kirsch Principal, Douglas Grafflin Elementary School Eric Byrne Principal, Roaring Brook Elementary School James Skoog Principal, Westorchard Elementary School Michele Glenn Assistant Principal, Horace Greeley High School Michael Taylor Assistant Principal, Horace Greeley High School Mark Bayer Assistant Principal, Horace Greeley High School Timothy Doyle Assistant Principal, Robert E. Bell Middle School Frank Zamperlin Assistant Principal, Seven Bridges Middle School Debbie Alspach Assistant Principal, Douglas Grafflin Elementary School Amy Fishkin Assistant Principal, Roaring Brook Elementary School Cathleen Winter Assistant Principal, Westorchard Elementary School Technology Department Darleen Nicolosi Director of Instructional Technology Gunnar Andersen Network Administrator John Louch Network Administrator Howard Giebel Support Specialist Vincent DiBenedetto Support Specialist John Gorman Database Manager Edgar Rubinshteyn Programmer Analyst Joy Guido Senior Office Assistant Lisa Ribushofski Office Assistant Page 3 of 65
    • DISTRICT TECHNOLOGY PLANNING TEAM Debbie Alspach Gunnar Andersen Rachel Ruggeri Deborah August Sally Cochran Fred Ende Anita Faria Howard Giebel Felice Gittelman John Louch Chris Louth Deborah Logan Darleen Nicolosi Suzi Novak Robert Oddo James Skoog Page 4 of 65
    • EXECUTIVE SUMMARY American education is at a crossroads. As educators work to transform schools into places that effectively prepare students to live, learn and work in a global, knowledge-based environment, they are faced with the incompatibility of an industrial age model attempting to meet the educational requirements of today’s information based society. The digital age requires high academic standards, technological fluency, communication skills, interpersonal skills, information literacy, and independence in learning and critical thinking abilities. These requirements reflect the need for educators to rethink current practices and acknowledge that technology is both a tool and a catalyst for creating pedagogical change. Technology has been shown to accelerate, enrich and deepen basic skills, but it also has the ability to enhance the development of basic skills and apply them in today’s digital age through problem solving, collaboration, analysis, evaluation and design. A strategic plan is therefore essential for successfully maximizing the potential of technology and integrating it into the educational environment to coincide with the requirements, challenges and demands of the 21st century. Additionally, educators need to define what it means to be educated in the context of a digital, knowledge-based society, as well as establish new measures for assessing progress toward success in today’s world. The following technology plan is a proactive visionary tool for the development of a planned integration of technology into new and existing curricula. This document will lay out a plan for assessing existing facilities, integrating current technology effectively and developing new facilities and programs throughout the Chappaqua Central School District. The Chappaqua Central School District consists of three K–4 elementary schools, two 5–8 middle schools and one 9–12 high school, with student enrollment totaling approximately 4,200 students. Page 5 of 65
    • PLANNING PROCESS A district technology committee was established in the fall of 2003, with representatives from various schools, charged with the mission of creating, revising and continually updating the district’s three year strategic technology plan. The committee is chaired by the Director of Instructional Technology, and addresses the learning and teaching needs of the students, as well as the technical infrastructure required to support those needs. Page 6 of 65
    • District Technology Vision DISTRICT TECHNOLOGY VISION The technology vision of the Chappaqua Central School District is to ensure that technology has a positive impact on learning by integrating it into the curricula throughout the district to meet existing goals and ideals, as well as in support of future initiatives. This can be accomplished by providing all staff members with the tools, information, policies and procedures for encouraging and fostering technology use. This vision will be reached by focusing on the following: Curriculum which integrates the use of various technology tools to help all students succeed in the 21st century. Professional Development guidelines that provide examples of best practices, turnkey training, modeling, collaboration, sustained ongoing support, differentiated instruction, action research, and “cutting-edge” technology use. Data Management strategies that use data to inform practice, manage information for accountability, chart progress, communicate with others in the school, district, home and community, and enhance instruction for students. An Infrastructure that adequately supports a growing district population and effectively utilizes new networking tools, current hardware and software, and human resources. Funding and Budgetary models that allow for current technology tools to be procured while providing future students and faculty with the monies to constantly remain up-to-date. Evaluative and Monitoring methods that help all members of the district determine the effectiveness of the technology plan and district technology use while also providing a basis to strive for greater digital equity. Page 7 of 65 CCSD Technology Plan 2007–2010 L:Tech Staff2007 Tech PlanTech Plan 2007-10 Revision 2.doc
    • CURRENT STATUS An overview of the current state of technology with recommendations for improvement. Network Infrastructure The Chappaqua Central School District’s network supports connectivity between seven buildings. Six megabit Internet service is provided over a fiber line connected to our Internet service provider. Since the fiber is capable of gigabit speeds, the Internet bandwidth can be increased without additional lines being run. Additional security is provided by a Cisco PIX firewall. A gigabit Ethernet backbone connects switching closets within each building. In 2006 the Wide Area Network (WAN) connecting the 7 buildings was upgraded to gigabit fiber. Numerous application servers are in operation at the high school, including servers for e-mail, Blackboard, content filtering, backups, web serving, the student management system, systems management and Citrix. Each remote site presently consists of one file/print server. The current backup strategy includes a central backup device at the high school and offsite tape storage. A weekly full backup runs every Friday with daily differentials. Tapes are rotated out and archived with every full tape stored for two months and every other full backup permanently archived. Archived tapes are stored in a fire proof safe at the high school for 2 months. After that time they are permanently stored in an offsite data storage facility. Servers are ordered with dual network cards and a remote management card in case of failure. Switches are ordered with expansion capabilities and a lifetime next-day replacement warranty, resulting in a cost reduction, as this was previously an added expense. Wireless laptop carts are used in grades 5–12. The wireless standard used in these systems is 802.11a, which provides a shared 54mbps connection to the network. The district is currently a Microsoft environment that consists of two network domains. This design suffers an administrative and hardware burden as more resources are required to support it. The district plans to eliminate the ADMIN domain, leaving a single domain. The district has replaced the old Winschool Student management System with Infinite Campus, a centralized database system with a web interface. Software In addition to the Microsoft Office Suite, which is installed district-wide, there are over 120 software applications installed throughout the district. The software categories are as follows: Page 8 of 65
    • Current Status Administrative Applications: Finance Manager: An integrated array of financial programs designed specifically for school districts, Finance Manager provides accounting, payroll, budget, requisition and human resources management. TransFinder: Designed for school districts to manage bus routes, TransFinder plans and reports on bus routes and schedules. Infinite Campus - Student Management System: A student database that provides for the following functions: student registration, enrollment, personal information, photos, medical and legal information, demographics, scheduling, attendance, grading, and discipline. SMS provides reports on all of these areas. Special Education Applications: Special education software includes administrative programs such as IEPDirect, a web-based solution for managing New York State special education student information and Woodcock-Johnson testing programs. Instructional software includes Aurora, Boardmaker, Edmark Reading, Lexia, Switch Games, Writing with Symbols, Away we Ride, Co-writer, Earobics, 5-Finger Typist and Picture This. Web Server: The district maintains a web server which hosts the district web site, a distinct web site for each school and an Intranet. The Intranet contains information for faculty and staff, including information and forms from the Human Resources and Benefits departments. It also has links to applications that produce labels and reports on student demographics, grades and attendance. Other staff applications include the sports database; emergency phone broadcast system and administration of the In-Service course database. Instructional Software: Blackboard: A web based system; Blackboard provides content management and sharing, online assessments, student tracking, assignment and portfolio management, and virtual collaboration. The instructional software supports a wide variety of disciplines. Many departments have software specifically for their area, such as the Sibelius, Finale, Musition, Aurelia, Music Ace and Cakewalk applications used by the Music departments, or the ArcView, Probeware, LoggerPro, and TI Connect software used by Science. See appendix C for a complete list of instructional software. Page 9 of 65 CCSD Technology Plan 2007–2010 L:Tech Staff2007 Tech PlanTech Plan 2007-10 Revision 2.doc
    • Current Status Access to Technology The Chappaqua Central School District has over 1600 PCs and approximately 200 laptops throughout its seven building school district. Currently, every PC and laptop has been standardized on Windows XP SP2. The three K–4 elementary schools (Douglas S. Grafflin, Roaring Brook and Westorchard) all have one computer lab housing 28 Dell computers. All labs are provided with one large screen color projector to support instruction, one large color printer, one black and white printer and an image scanner. In addition to the network and instructional software, all computer labs are configured to utilize a program called Net-Op. This program allows the instructor to remote control any computer’s desktop, project that image on the projector screen, or have the teacher’s desktop image manifest itself on any and all of the computers in the room. This software has allowed for uniquely innovative approaches in large group instruction. The labs are also equipped with smart card readers, which allow teachers to upload digital pictures from their cameras and incorporate them into daily lesson plans. Grades 1–4 incorporate a 5 cluster classroom computer model. One computer is situated at the front of the room, connected to a presentation monitor, while the remaining four computers are set up in the back with a network printer. Kindergarten classrooms contain two computers, and a color printer which both PCs can utilize. Directly next to each lab are the library media centers which contain eight computers, a network printer, and an online card catalog system for student research. The two 5–8 middle schools (Robert E. Bell and Seven Bridges) have two computer labs housing 28 Pentium IV Dell computers, a large screen color projector to support instruction, one large color printer, one black and white printer and an image scanner. In addition to the large computer labs, labs have also been set up to support the instructional requirements of the middle technology program. A technology lab is located in each building with 26 computers and specialized software to support the middle school curriculum. Additionally, 8 computers are installed in each of the middle school art labs with access to color printing. Wireless mobile laptop carts with five laptops are also utilized in the middle schools. These carts are circulated throughout the buildings to support the curricular infusion of technology, and are configured to execute all of software titles available on the desktop PCs. The middle schools each have a library media center equipped with 16 computers available for research/class work. The middle schools also employ the 5 cluster classroom computer model, with a teacher station connected to a large screen presentation monitor situated in the front of the room, and four PCs set up in the rear of the room for student use. The only inconsistency to this falls in the foreign language, music and special education classrooms. Special education rooms generally are set up with one to four computers, while music has one Page 10 of 65 CCSD Technology Plan 2007–2010
    • Current Status teacher station connected to a large screen presentation monitor. Excluding the special education and music rooms which have a myriad of customized software available to address their curriculum requirements, all of the other computers offer the same software available to anyone with network access. Chappaqua’s 9–12 high school (Horace Greeley) has three computer labs. Two are located next to each other, each consisting of 28 Dell computers, sharing 4 black and white printers, and one color printer. The third lab has 24 PCs and one black and white printer. Each lab has one computer with Net-Op installed for instructional purposes, and two labs have projectors. Additionally there are two mini-labs and several clustered classrooms throughout the campus. One mini-lab is located directly across the hall from the high school’s main computer lab. It is generally utilized for any demand overflow from the main lab as well as several after school programs. The other mini-lab is the art lab. This lab accommodates 17 computers, one presentation monitor, and access to both black and white and color printing. In addition, the science department has two 16 unit wireless laptop carts, used for science research and physics. The L.I.F.E. school, a specialized high school program enrolling approximately 43–45 students, has a wireless laptop cart with 25 computers configured for use on the school network. The high school library media center has 20 computers. Two off these are located on kiosks for quick access to the library catalog and online databases. The Education Center, which houses district administration, consists of 37 computers and 27 printers, each with the Microsoft Office Suite installed, as well as administrative applications for students, finance, special education and transportation. A conference room, configured with a computer and a smartboard is available for presentations. The district maintains a centralized, online, technical support help desk. Faculty and staff can submit repair reports or work orders to the technology office online. The report is stamped and given a number, so that faculty and staff can track the status of the request online. Every school’s customized web home page provides a hyperlink directing them to the online support page. Year round software maintenance is routinely performed for security updates, which include the continual threat of computer viruses, vulnerabilities in Microsoft source code as well as unwanted access from internal and external sources. Additionally, application software updates are periodically pushed out from a central server, eliminating the need for technicians to travel around the district. Hardware images are created for implementing major upgrades to operating systems. Also, as technological needs increase, a structured upgrade process is necessary to maintain acceptable levels of hardware performance, therefore desktops and laptops are on a five year replacement cycle. Page 11 of 65 CCSD Technology Plan 2007–2010 L:Tech Staff2007 Tech PlanTech Plan 2007-10 Revision 2.doc
    • Current Status CHAPPAQUA CENTRAL SCHOOL DISTRICT HARDWARE INVENTORY Building Desktop Computers Laptops Printers Douglas S. Grafflin 205 1 46 Roaring Brook 182 2 46 Westorchard 182 1 42 Robert E. Bell 364 9 63 Seven Bridges 325 24 54 Horace Greeley 348 123 74 Education Center 37 8 27 Pole Barn 7 0 1 1,650 168 352 Curriculum Integrating technology into the curriculum means viewing technology as an instructional tool for delivering subject matter in the curriculum already in place. It involves students constructing their own learning while using both hardware and software tools in instructional environments that emphasize collaborative learning, inquiry-based learning and an overall emphasis on student-centered approaches for both teacher and student. Technology integration can transform teaching and learning, but understanding the pedagogical possibilities is paramount to successful integration. To assist the instructional staff with integration, the Chappaqua Central School District has developed K–12 technology and information literacy competencies based upon standards defined by the International Society of Technology in Education. The competencies are centered on the basic belief that student achievement is best enhanced when students first master basic operations and concepts of technology, understand ethical and responsible use, and then begin to use technology as a productivity tool for communication, research, problem-solving and decision-making. These competencies will enable the instructional staff to effectively integrate technology into the curriculum by providing guidelines and benchmarks for instructional delivery. Teacher Uses of Technology District Wide Teacher technology use varies, as illustrated below from data derived from the Net Day 2006 Teacher Survey, a national survey conducted yearly with a high level of confidence. Approximately 15 % (78 respondents) of the teaching staff completed the survey. Nationally, over 300,000 teachers participated in the survey. In general, teachers in the district are at or above their peers nationally in technology knowledge, integration and innovation. The vast majority believe that Page 12 of 65 CCSD Technology Plan 2007–2010
    • Current Status technology has improved their effectiveness as a teacher (72%), by improving student engagement (60%), allowing the creation of richer lesson plans (64%) and aiding in differentiation (62%). Almost all teachers use e-mail daily, and over 30% maintain a class website. Most teachers have communicated with parents using e-mail (80%), while 30% have communicated by e-mail with students. A few teachers are using blogs, wikis and podcasting. Word processing, recording grades, researching and preparing lessons are tasks that are performed most frequently (58%). Most teachers believe that technology has enhanced student performance and achievement (85%), specifically in the areas of engagement in learning (65%), collaboration/teamwork, critical thinking and problem solving and learning concepts and skills (all around 40%). The technology services that teachers believe have the greatest potential to improve student success at school are having computers in classrooms for student use (55%) and having assistive technology for students with special needs (46%). Approximately one-third of respondents also included services such as a school website, televisions/projectors and DVD’s in classrooms, laptops for students to use at school, tools that help parents and teachers communicate and digital curriculum that augments textbooks and print curriculum. Most teachers (74%) believe that the school is doing a good job preparing students for success in the 21st century. Skills cited as important for the future are thinking critically, good work ethic, and problem solving. More than half the respondents believed that students need good technology skills in order to be successful in school, including college and graduate work, find a job, be well- informed, and to keep in touch with family and friends. Obstacles in using technology include not having enough computers (38%), lack of time in the school day (56%) and not enough professional development (70%). Teachers would like more professional development, through learning teams and district-provided training primarily focused on integrating technology into their curriculum (47%). The technology issues that concern a majority of teachers surveyed included online bullying, privacy and security, safety from online predators, access to inappropriate websites, and students spending too much time using computers. Comparing students in the United States with students internationally, teachers believe that our students need to improve communication skills (61%), have more experience solving complex problems and thinking through new ideas (60%), improve creative thinking (53%) and be able to learn new skills independently (51%). Most teachers (85%) believed that the math and science curriculums in the district helped students learn critical thinking and problem solving skills. The majority of teachers feel that interactive whiteboards in every classroom (51%) and embedded professional development time (53%) are the most important future goals of the district. Page 13 of 65 CCSD Technology Plan 2007–2010 L:Tech Staff2007 Tech PlanTech Plan 2007-10 Revision 2.doc
    • Current Status Elementary Primarily, teachers use technology to generate instructional materials and communicate information. E-mail and word processing are utilized more than any other available technology. There are small pockets of use in varying degrees with technologies that include presentation software, graphic organizers, web publishing, digital imaging, Internet resources, and multimedia production. Teachers are generating report cards, lesson plans, instructional materials, organizational tools and share these on our network drives. The sharing of resources on network drives continues to expand. Interactive whiteboards have been introduced in a few elementary classrooms, one computer lab and two library media centers. The Technology Integration Teachers offer training, support and resources. There is tremendous enthusiasm for this technology. Videoconferencing occurs regularly at a pilot school, where the equipment was installed in December, 2006. The decision for the initial placement of the equipment was made in conjunction with the building administrators. The Technology Integration Teachers offer training, support and resources. Lab Aides have also been trained so that they can supply on-site assistance to teachers when they are videoconferencing. Videoconferencing workshops conducted by the Technology Integration Teachers help teachers select appropriate partners, set-up effective environments and learn basic videoconferencing skills. Teachers are supported throughout their videoconferencing work in the following ways: VC partners are located and arrangements for the videoconferencing session are made for the teacher planning rubrics and evaluation tools are supplied, and technicians are available throughout the process to assist with hardware and connectivity issues. Scanners, digital cameras, microscope probes and other peripheral devices are also used to create electronic and paper products and projects. Assistive Technology devices are used to generate writing pieces and communicate ideas. Students are comfortable using a word processing tool and tutorial programs to create documents and practice skills. Students also have supervised access to the Internet where they conduct research, watch instructional videos and simulations, and gather information. All students are given grade-appropriate instruction on how to navigate the desktop, access disk drives, view the contents of folders, print and launch applications. Although several software applications are used across the grades, including the Microsoft Office suite of productivity tools, the following highlight a few applications used to address particular curricula areas: • In kindergarten classes, students learn the alphabet, and make electronic books with Wiggleworks, a K–2 literacy program. Graphs are replicated in a program called the Graph Club. Page 14 of 65 CCSD Technology Plan 2007–2010
    • Current Status • First graders use Kidspiration, a graphic organizer, as a pre-writing tool to organize and sort words and concepts. Wiggleworks and the Graph Club are also used at this level. • Second grade students access CD-ROM encyclopedias for research, electronic mapping tools to create maps and write directions, and Math Keys to learn and practice math concepts and skills. • Third grade students begin formal keyboarding instruction and also use PowerPoint to present research and information that they have gathered from electronic and paper resources. • Fourth grade students use Excel to enter collected data from a science experiment and graph it to look for trends and patterns. Students are also learning how to create animations and produce digital movies. Teachers have carefully designed web searches for students to access relevant information about what they are studying. Middle Schools In discussions with teachers, most described incorporating presentation software into their daily teaching routines. Whether for “Do-Now” activities, daily agendas, slideshows or student presentations, quite a few teachers felt that presentation software, and the use of a large classroom monitor were staple parts of their instruction. They also indicated this was an area that required the greatest aid. Many teachers also use the Internet for student-based research, furthering their own knowledge, as well as maintaining (or designing) web pages. While web design was not prevalent in the instructional strategies, it is important to note that many teachers now have individual and team web pages that list everything from homework assignments, to class links, and important team dates. Additionally, newer tools are being infused into the curriculum by many teachers. Science teachers at the middle level are experimenting with the use of a variety of digital probes for project-based learning opportunities. A number of teachers currently use distance learning tools such as Blackboard in their instruction, a tool which also plays a role in instruction at the high school level. Math teachers have incorporated the use of Geometer’s Sketchpad, as well as using interdisciplinary sites like Brainpop.com for concept supplements. Forms of high- tech assistive technology devices are also in use. Interactive whiteboards have been installed in all 5 – 8 math and science classrooms. Intensive curriculum based training has been ongoing, during the school day, in the summer, and through learning teams and professional development sessions after school. All of the teachers using the interactive whiteboards are extremely enthusiastic about this tool, and have worked extensively to redesign their materials to use the enhanced learning features and interactivity of the whiteboards. Page 15 of 65 CCSD Technology Plan 2007–2010 L:Tech Staff2007 Tech PlanTech Plan 2007-10 Revision 2.doc
    • Current Status Videoconferencing equipment is now in place in both middle schools. Teachers are making use of this communication and distance learning tool, particularly in the area of world languages. High School Technology use by students includes a wide range, including: word processing and editing of student writing, Blackboard on-line learning, online research in most disciplines, student presentations, laptop-based data analysis in science classes with probes, digital calculators in math and advanced programming courses, use of PhotoShop in Art and for various student publications, use of digital editing software, and laptops to support individual, performance-based learning in L.I.F.E., including digital portfolios. Within the high school environment, students take a great deal of responsibility for their own time and learning and students naturally choose to use tools necessary for their learning. Further, since students are not restricted as to when, where, or for what they can use resources such as e-mail and the Internet, they have naturally developed a familiarity with using these tools within the context of their educational work.” Interactive Whiteboards have been installed in most math and science classrooms in the high school and are being used effectively by the teachers. Videoconferencing at the high school has also been introduced to students, particularly in the area of world languages and the arts, and continues to evolve. In terms of future directions, “At the secondary level, concern shifts to students’ ability to ethically use technology and to critically review technologically mediated information.” In addition, there is the suggestion that a vision for the future needs to include students and faculty using technology to truly transform the district’s teaching and learning environment. Here, the initial emphasis is more on how teachers might use technologies to support reformed pedagogies such as collaborative learning, inquiry-based learning, and an overall emphasis on student-centered environments. One specific approach to achieve this vision is to deepen professional development offerings to feature study and sharing of effective and innovative practices. Web 2.0 computing is being used in the most innovative technology curriculums, including podcasting, blogs, and wikis. Currently, the district technology planning committee and the Greeley Technology Competency Committee are engaged in outlining achievable goals to advance effective technology integration in line with the results from the NetDay 2006 survey. Assistive Technology Representatives from the Special Education Department and the Technology Department regularly met to address the technology needs of students with disabilities. With guidance from the Director of Special Education, an assistive technology committee was formed in the fall of 2000. The committee is comprised of representatives of regular and special education K–12 teachers, Page 16 of 65 CCSD Technology Plan 2007–2010
    • Current Status occupational therapists, speech pathologists, and technology. One of the accomplishments of this committee was to develop an AT referral procedure. The technology department supports the special education department in a variety of ways including providing greater computer access e.g., the control panel to adapt keyboard access to individual students, technology support for AT trainings, and a developing database of district-wide hardware and software. In addition, software such as Boardmaker, Lexia, Aurora and Co-Writer are networked AT supports. A “Lo-Tech” kit for graphomotor difficulties is also housed at each of the elementary and middle schools. Professional Development Instructional technology support is available through in-service courses and workshops, summer institutes, project/curriculum work; teacher designed learning teams, as well as ongoing support from the instructional technology specialists and district technology staff. Staffing The technology staff consists of a Director of Instructional Technology, two network administrators, two hardware support specialists, a database manager, a programmer analyst, seven lab aides, two technology integration teachers, and two clerical assistants. The Director of Instructional Technology is responsible for guiding the development and implementation of the district's technology plan; providing oversight of technical, administrative and building-based support teams; and collaborating with instructional specialists, staff developers, and faculty in the integration of technology and professional development opportunities. The network administrators provide support for the network infrastructure, while the two hardware support specialists address on-site troubleshooting, investigation, and hardware and software repair. The database manager addresses the district’s data requirements along with the programmer analyst and the clerical assistants provide administrative support for the technology department. Each building has a computer lab aide responsible for providing building-based instructional support with a focus on effective use and operation of the computer lab, and first level technical support such as account set-up and security. A district lab aide provides additional support for each building. Two technology integration teachers serve the district. As a team, they work with the Director to develop and support the teaching staff in the effective integration of technology throughout the district as well as plan in-service courses and support learning teams. Although some of their work overlaps, in general, one of the specialists concentrates on the elementary schools and support of district- wide videoconferencing and the other specialist focuses on the middle schools and high school along with supporting interactive whiteboard use district-wide. Page 17 of 65 CCSD Technology Plan 2007–2010 L:Tech Staff2007 Tech PlanTech Plan 2007-10 Revision 2.doc
    • Current Status Data Management The district’s data management objective is to centralize and integrate district data, eliminate redundancy and develop strategies that use data to inform practice, manage information for accountability, chart progress, communicate with others in the school, district, home and community and enhance instruction for students. Additionally, as administrative applications evolve, the district will continue to explore the integration of administrative applications. The district has completed a major upgrade of its student management system during the 2006-07 school year. This upgrade provided a centralized database with web-based access and enhanced functionality. Subsequent phases will be defined which will include web-based portal access and an auto-dialer for attendance notifications. The district is also working with our local Regional Information Center to ensure that we are in compliance with the State Education Department’s data warehousing reporting and repository requirements. As timely district communication is essential to staff members and the community, the school-to-home communication methods has been expanded to include: e-mail notifications, web site enhancements, and an emergency Phone Alert System. Ongoing expansion of our internal Intranet will provide district staff with relevant district/school information. Budgeting and Spending Plan The district adheres to the Total Cost of Ownership model which maximizes technology investments by analyzing and focusing on direct and indirect costs of technology investments. The Chappaqua Central School district has a carefully planned technology budget that accounts for scheduled software upgrades and hardware replacements. Additionally, budget line items account for professional development, equipment, supplies, software licensing, repairs and service contracts. The successful implementation of this technology plan requires alignment with the technology budget and an annual review of the spending requirements to ensure that the goals and objectives of this plan are achievable. Page 18 of 65 CCSD Technology Plan 2007–2010
    • GOALS AND OBJECTIVES Goal 1: Service Improvement and Network Upgrades I. Software Upgrades (p.22) a. Vista evaluation and upgrade b. Office 2007 evaluation and upgrade c. Blackboard upgrade II. Hardware maintenance (p.22) a. Replace old switches b. Replace old printers c. Scheduled PC replacements d. Scheduled server replacements III. Network (p.23) a. Network access control b. Public hot spots c. Accommodate Macs on the network d. Rewiring classrooms e. Replacing mini-hubs f. Domain consolidation g. Annual bandwidth analysis/assessment Goal 2: Curriculum — Provide an integrated technological environment that will advance teaching and learning and provide students with tools to help them succeed in the 21st century (p.25) I. School based technology committee objectives: (p.25) a. Infuse technology competencies into the curriculum b. Technology resource awareness/communication c. Building instructional support d. Research, explore and propose new technologies e. Technology infusion into curricular goals and district initiatives f. Pursue and propose the development of discipline specific projects in regard to district initiatives and new technologies g. Software evaluation process h. Evaluate the impact of infrastructure on teaching and learning i. Determine the effectiveness of mobile technologies j. Evaluate lab effectiveness k. Determine effectiveness of classroom computer models l. Integrate student tech competencies into classroom practice (p.26) Page 19 of 65
    • Goals and Objectives m. Fully develop the K-12 technology competencies and integrate them into the district’s curriculum mapping and information literacy initiatives (p.27) n. School-based technology committees refine and revise the competencies at their level o. District-wide technology committee adopts final revisions p. Enhance Middle level technology curriculum (p.27) Goal 3: Professional Development – To continually provide teachers, students, administrators, support staff and other members of the community with relevant technology-related professional development with a focus toward improving student achievement. I. Encourage school based technology committees to pursue and propose the development of discipline specific training in regard to the delivery of instruction for district initiatives and new technologies (p.28) II. Expand professional development program (p.29) III. Accommodate the varying skill level of teachers IV. Provide in-service opportunities which allow for collaboration with colleagues V. Expand the number of teacher-to-teacher training opportunities VI. Increase focus on unit design and imbedding technology within the curriculum VII. Ensure staff training opportunities coincide with student competencies VIII. Address new district faculty and staff training requirements IX. Increase lab assistant collaboration (p.29) X. Support sessions XI. Technology Training/Certification (p.29) a. Ensure that the technology staff and facilitators are up to date with the latest technologies and certifications in their respective areas XII. Technology Department Staff development (p.30) XIII. Staff meeting updates a. Collaboration with school based technology committees b. Administrative council updates XIV. District Application-specific training for faculty, staff and administrators a. Student Management System b. Data Warehouse Goal 4: Data Management – Integrate, centralize and provide appropriate data and information to district staff and the community Page 20 of 65 CCSD Technology Plan 2007–2010
    • Goals and Objectives I. Continued development of a Data Warehouse to support curricular analysis, program effectiveness and district administrative functions (p.31) II. Additional upgrade phases of the student management system to provide: (p.31) a. Portal b. Auto-dialer for attendance notifications II. Expand school-to-home communication methods (p.31) III. Explore additional ways to use community e-mail notification system IV. Web site enhancements V. Phone alert system analysis VI. Explore the integration of district administrative applications (p.31) a. Human resources b. Finance Manager c. TransFinder d. Student Management System VII. Intranet expansion (p.25) VIII. Increase resource availability IX. Online staff database Goal 5: Monitoring and Evaluation - An evaluation process will be developed to measure ongoing progress of goals and objectives, as well an appropriate and timely evaluation, update and revision of the technology plan. I. Technology plan, along with its goals and objectives will be periodically monitored, evaluated and updated by the Director of Instructional Technology and appropriate staff members. Reconvening of the district technology planning committee members will also occur periodically. (p.25) Goal 6: Alignment of a spending plan that coincides with technology acquisitions and maximizes technology investments I. Successful implementation of this technology plan requires alignment with the technology budget and an annual review of the spending requirements to ensure that the goals and objectives of this plan are achievable. Continued adherence to the Total Cost of Ownership model, which is planning for the life cycle costs for technology, including capital, administration and operation, and end user operation will allow the district to continue to maximize technology investments. (p.35) Page 21 of 65 CCSD Technology Plan 2007–2010 L:Tech Staff2007 Tech PlanTech Plan 2007-10 Revision 2.doc
    • IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGIES Goal 1: Service Improvement and Network Upgrades Objective I: Software Upgrades The district should analyze new software and deploy it as needed. Microsoft Vista and Office 2007 should be installed in test environments to determine the usefulness of the software in school environment and if it will be cost effective to upgrade. Blackboard software will be upgraded to the Enterprise version. Year 1 (2007–08) Blackboard Enterprise upgrade The Enterprise version of Blackboard has several advantages including the ability to manage podcasts and integration with Active Directory. Year 2 (2008–09) Vista and Office 2007 Load the software in targeted locations where they will be most effective. Objective II: Hardware maintenance The district should continue its current practice of scheduled replacements of PCs, laptops and servers. PCs and laptops are retired from service after 5 years. In order to ensure network availability, servers are not kept when support contracts are no longer available. Servers are retired after their support contracts run out – usually 4 years. Printers are not retired on a set schedule; they are replaced when they are broken beyond repair. Many printers have reached the point where they are not capable of handling the graphics frequently encountered in modern computing. The district should study the capabilities of the printers and the classroom needs and create a schedule for replacing some printers that no longer meet educational needs. The network switches to which individual PCs are connected are combination of Hewlett Packard and Marconi. The warranties for the Marconi switches have expired and it is not fiscally prudent to purchase support contracts for them. The district should replace these switches with Hewlett Packard switches. The Hewlett Packard switches come with lifetime warranties, eliminating the expensive support contracts. Concentrating the new switches at Horace Greeley will have the added Page 22 of 65
    • Implementation Strategies Goal 1: Service Improvement and Network Upgrades benefit of allowing the use of Layer 3 switching throughout the Greeley campus. Year 1 (2007–08) Network switch replacements Replace the older Marconi switches. Hardware Replacements Year 2/3 (2008–10) Hardware Replacements III: Network Maintenance The district should use McAfee’s NAC to implement Network Access Control. Up until now the district network has been protected from intrusion by not allowing people to plug any device into the network. NAC will enforce this rule, automatically turning off ports where unauthorized devices are detected. Although individual servers on the network are protected from unauthorized intruders by domain policies and anti-virus software, intruders could cause trouble by creating excessive network traffic or by denial of service attacks. Public hot spots, where wireless devices owned by students and faculty may access the Internet, should be installed in selected locations for people who prefer to use their own devices. Allowing students to use their own laptops could also free up computers in the labs. The hot spots should be subject to the same Internet filtering as the rest of the network, but the district network should be partitioned from the public network by the use of VLANs and Layer 3 routing. Although most software is available in both Windows and Mac versions, there are a few instances where applications work better on Macs. By the use of NAC and Apple management utilities, the network should be able to accommodate Macs. Together these utilities will let the Technology Department monitor the network usage of the Macs and check for inappropriate or unlicensed software. Currently small hubs are being used in many classrooms where a direct run to a switch closet should be used. The district should continue to work on replacing hubs on an ongoing basis and use them only as stopgap measures as they cause problems when using high bandwidth applications. Over the next three years, classrooms should be gradually rewired with direct runs. Windows domain consolidation should continue, ending with a single domain model. The EC domain has been eliminated, but restrictions on password policies have delayed the removal of the ADMIN domain. A Page 23 of 65 CCSD Technology Plan 2007–2010 L:Tech Staff2007 Tech PlanTech Plan 2007-10 Revision 2.doc
    • Implementation Strategies Goal 1: Service Improvement and Network Upgrades typical Microsoft single domain allows only a single password policy. It is the district security policy that administrators and teachers should have stricter password policies than students. It would also be helpful to differentiate older students and younger students in password policies. The District should install password policy software that will allow multiple password policies on a single domain. This software will allow the elimination of the ADMIN domain and the consequent relief from the administrative and hardware costs associated with it. There should be an annual reassessment of Internet use to determine if the district needs to increase its available bandwidth. Year 1 (2007–08) Hot spot at Horace Greeley and Password Policy software Safe Internet access will be provided in the Student Commons. This installation will be studied as a model for hot spots in other schools. Password policy software installed on the network will allow stricter security for staff and older students while not burdening the elementary students with complex passwords. Year 2 (2008–09) More hot spots and domain consolidation The Greeley hot spot created in Year 1 of the plan will be replicated in common areas at other schools. McAfee NAC will be implemented. The ADMIN domain will be eliminated. One server supporting the domain will be retired. Page 24 of 65 CCSD Technology Plan 2007–2010
    • Implementation Strategies Goal 2: Curriculum Goal 2: Curriculum Provide an integrated technological environment that will advance teaching and learning and provide students with tools to help them succeed in the 21st century Objective I: School based technology committees and the district level technology committee Year 1 (2007–08) School based technology committees will reconvene in each building in the fall of 2007 to move forward the work of transforming teaching and learning through the use of technology. These committees will meet with the Director of Technology to review the technology plan for the district and to discuss building specific planning. The building level committees will work on some or all of the following: • infusing information literacy and technology competencies into existing curriculum • communicating technology resources to faculty • providing instructional support around technology usage • researching, exploring and proposing new technologies • infusing technology into curricular goals and district initiatives • proposing and pursuing the development of discipline specific projects which support district initiatives and new technologies • evaluating new software • providing leadership, in conjunction with the professional development team, around action research projects relating to technology School based technology committees will create a mechanism to reflect and evaluate work that occurs in year one. The results of this tool will help inform work for future years. The district level team will meet on an ongoing basis to discuss implementation of the district technology plan and to share building level work. Page 25 of 65 CCSD Technology Plan 2007–2010 L:Tech Staff2007 Tech PlanTech Plan 2007-10 Revision 2.doc
    • Implementation Strategies Goal 2: Curriculum Year 2 (2008–09) School based technology committees will continue building specific work. The district level team will continue to meet on an ongoing basis to support the implementation of the technology plan. Year 3 (2009–10) School based technology committees will continue building specific work. The district level team will continue to meet on an ongoing basis to support the implementation of the technology plan. Objective II: Review and revise the Technology Competencies and K- 12 Information Literacy competencies and align with ISTE revisions Year 1 (2007–08) The technology integration with work with building committees to disseminate, review and revise the technology competencies. After these competencies are distributed, school technology committees will present the competencies that are applicable to each building at a faculty meeting in the fall. In an effort to design embedded and authentic assessments of student technology competencies and to demonstrate different ways that the competencies can be embedded in curricula, the school technology committees and building administrators will be charged with the task of identifying existing examples of this type of work being done in each of their buildings. This work will begin early in the 2007-08 school year and be ongoing. Teachers will be asked to share the work that they are doing with their colleagues in faculty meetings. Year 2 (2008–09) The standards for Information Literacy and Technology Competencies will be integrated into the curriculum mapping process. Building technology teams, along with administration, will continue to identify and share examples of best practice in the area of embedded, authentic technology work relating to the competencies. Page 26 of 65 CCSD Technology Plan 2007–2010
    • Implementation Strategies Goal 2: Curriculum Year 3 (2009–10) Building Technology Teams and the district technology committee will meet to reflect on The Information Literacy and Technology Competencies, evaluate the effectiveness of curricular integration and revise the document as necessary. In addition, an ongoing evaluation process will be established in conjunction with curriculum mapping work. Building technology teams, along with administration, will continue to identify and share examples of best practice in the area of embedded, authentic technology work relating to the competencies. Objective III: Enhance Middle Level Technology Curriculum Year 1 (2007–08) Assess/Revise middle level technology program for grades 5 – 8. Units of study will be defined using a systems approach. Year 2 (2008–09) Monitor and revise accordingly. Year 3 (2009–10) Monitor and revise accordingly. Page 27 of 65 CCSD Technology Plan 2007–2010 L:Tech Staff2007 Tech PlanTech Plan 2007-10 Revision 2.doc
    • Implementation Strategies Goal 3: Professional Development Goal 3: Professional Development To continually provide teachers, students, administrators, support staff and other members of the community with relevant technology-related professional development with a focus on improving student achievement. Objective I: Encourage school-based technology committees to pursue and propose the development of discipline specific training in regard to the delivery of instruction for district initiatives and new technologies. Year 1 (2007–08) In order to establish technology connections with district-wide initiatives and information literacy technology competencies, the committees will: • Identify specific training needs and create training sessions • Identify student learning needs and make connections to technology • Share best practices among colleagues • Support the implementation of Information Technology Literacy competencies • Provide models for teachers to connect their work and their own learning goals to the competencies Year 2 (2008-09) Committee work will be ongoing Year 3 (2009-10) Committee work will be ongoing Objective II: Support the interactive whiteboard implementation throughout the district Year 1/2/3 (2007–10) Technology integration teachers will ensure the success of integrating interactive whiteboards throughout the district by delivering research-based professional development models that incorporate collaboration, teacher-to-teacher training opportunities and modeling. Page 28 of 65 CCSD Technology Plan 2007–2010
    • Implementation Strategies Goal 3: Professional Development Objective III: Expand professional development program Year 1/2/3 (2007–10) Through collaboration with district staff and alignment with the district professional development plan, training opportunities will be expanded to: • Accommodate the varying skill levels of teachers • Provide in-service opportunities which allow for collaboration with colleagues • Expand the number of teacher-to-teacher training opportunities • Increase focus on unit design and imbedding technology into the curriculum • Ensure staff training opportunities to coincide with information literacy technology competencies • Address new district faculty and staff training requirements Objective IV: Increase lab assistant collaboration Year 1 (2007–08) Extending the role of lab assistants for individual and small group support will provide resources and support for the integration of technology into the curriculum. Furthermore, facilitating increased awareness on the part of the faculty of the kind of support available from the lab aides will encourage teachers to ask the lab aides for help. Year 2 (2008–09) Ongoing lab assistant collaboration Year 3 (2009–10) Ongoing lab assistant collaboration Objective V: Technology Training/Certification Ensure that Technology Department Staff has appropriate training and recertification Year 1/2/3 (2007–10) The faculty and staff will attend conferences, and technology specialists will provide research to ensure that faculty and staff are Page 29 of 65 CCSD Technology Plan 2007–2010 L:Tech Staff2007 Tech PlanTech Plan 2007-10 Revision 2.doc
    • Implementation Strategies Goal 3: Professional Development aware of new technologies. Technology committees will also post new technology information using various forms of communication via hard copy, e-mail and the share drive. Objective VI: Technology Department Staff Development Year 1/2/3 (2007-10) The Technology Department will update staff on initiatives, policies and relevant information as required. Additionally, the Director of Technology will provide updates to administrators at administrative council meetings. Ongoing collaboration and updates will occur with building committees. Objective VII: District application-specific training for faculty, staff and administrators Year 1 (2007–08) Build technology learning teams in every school in the district. • Identify faculty and staff training needs as they relate to district applications • Faculty and staff will identify and attend appropriate conferences Year 2 (2008–09) Ongoing training needs will be evaluated annually Year 3 (2009–10) Ongoing training needs will be evaluated annually Page 30 of 65 CCSD Technology Plan 2007–2010
    • Implementation Strategies Goal 4: Data Management Goal 4: Data Management Continued alignment of the data warehouse to state and federal reporting requirements as well as district initiatives. Objective I: Data Warehouse Enhancements Year 1 (2007–08) Incorporate Beds data, assessments and district data into the data warehouse Year 2 (2008–09) The data warehouse will be expanded to incorporate additional district data requirements Year 3 (2009–10) Data warehouse expansion. Objective II: Continue to exploit the functionality of the new student management system Year 1 (2007–08) Subsequent phases of our student management system will be defined with additional enhancements. A portal and auto-dialer for attendance notification will be available. Year 2/3 (2008–10) Continued exploitation of the student management system. Objective III: Expand school-to-home communication methods Year 1 (2007–08) School-to-home communication methods will be evaluated. Year 2 (2008–09) Appropriate revisions and enhancement will be made to all communication methods. Year 3 (2009–10) Continue to review, update and revise communication protocols. Page 31 of 65 CCSD Technology Plan 2007–2010 L:Tech Staff2007 Tech PlanTech Plan 2007-10 Revision 2.doc
    • Implementation Strategies Goal 4: Data Management Objective IV: Intranet Expansion Year 1/2/3 (2007–10) Ongoing Expansion Page 32 of 65 CCSD Technology Plan 2007–2010
    • Implementation Strategies Goal 5: Monitoring and Evaluation Goal 5: Monitoring and Evaluation A process will be developed to monitor the implementation of the technology plan, and to study and evaluate the effectiveness of technology to support student learning. Objective I: Develop a monitoring rubric to track the implementation of the technology plan Year 1 (2007–08) The district technology committee will design the technology plan monitoring rubric using available best practice. Objective II: Determine how classroom computers are being used by teachers and students Year 1 (2007–08) Surveys and network reports will provide a mechanism to analyze classroom computer utilization. Year 2 (2008–09) Building committees will collect, collate and analyze utilization survey data. Action plans will be drafted to address identified issues and/or problems. Year 3 (2009–10) Implement, evaluate and revise action plans. Objective III: Determine the effectiveness of mobile technologies Year 1 (2007–08) The Director of Technology and network technicians will collect and analyze laptop log-in data and laptop reliability/accessibility data for the various laptop pods throughout the district. Using this data as a starting point, the district technology committee and appropriate building committees will then acquire additional information as needed by developing and administering a survey for the faculty and staff on the instructional impact of laptops. Page 33 of 65 CCSD Technology Plan 2007–2010 L:Tech Staff2007 Tech PlanTech Plan 2007-10 Revision 2.doc
    • Implementation Strategies Goal 5: Monitoring and Evaluation Year 2/3 (2008–09) The district technology committee will collaborate with the Director of Technology to analyze data collected on laptop usage, develop a rating scale to determine effectiveness, and make recommendations for laptop wireless usage. Objective IV: Evaluate the effectiveness of the computer lab configuration and availability Year 1 (2007–08) The technology integration teachers will draft and distribute a survey to teachers to determine the percentage of teachers using the lab, objective of lab use, lab availability, and whether or not the lab is meeting teachers’ instructional needs. In addition, lab usage will be compiled by the lab aides. Based on results, the building technology committee, in conjunction with the Director of Technology will make lab use configuration recommendations for the 2008–09 school year. Year 2 (2008–09) Lab configurations will be implemented and monitored by the Director of Technology and appropriate staff. Year 3 (2009–10) Ongoing lab monitoring Page 34 of 65 CCSD Technology Plan 2007–2010
    • Implementation Strategies Goal 6: Alignment of a spending plan that coincides with technology acquisitions and maximizes technology investments. Goal 6: Alignment of a spending plan that coincides with technology acquisitions and maximizes technology investments. Objective I: Determine best methods to structure budgetary spending for designing a cost-effective budget. TCO model Year 1 (2007–08) During the first year of the plan, the Instructional Technology Director along with the network technicians will evaluate the current district technology budget for potential reductions in current expenditures and determine necessary budget needs for the following year. The approved budget for the year includes the following key items: 2630-200 Equipment (Peripherals/accessories) $219,700 2630-400 Contract Services $864,208 2630-400 Contract State Lease (Hardware) $444,962 2360-460 State Aided Computer Software $195,050 2630-449 Technology Training (Professional Development) $25,000 2630-401 Summer Help $8,000 2630-415 Travel $2,400 2630-450 Supplies $4,000 2630-150 Instructional Staff (Technology Integration Teachers - 2) 188,490 2630-160 Non-instructional Staff (clerical staff - 9) 296,791 Total 2,248,601 Page 35 of 65 CCSD Technology Plan 2007–2010 L:Tech Staff2007 Tech PlanTech Plan 2007-10 Revision 2.doc
    • Implementation Strategies Goal 6: Alignment of a spending plan that coincides with technology acquisitions and maximizes technology investments. Year 2 (2008–09) The current budget will be evaluated for effective budgetary spending. Using data collected by building and district committees, this evaluation will allow more effective spending guidelines and will further promote purchasing as well as hiring of staff based on sound data management. The proposed budget for the year includes the following key items: 2630-200 Equipment (Peripherals/accessories) $219,700 2630-400 Contract Services $874,208 2630-400 Contract State Lease (Hardware) $420,000 2360-460 State Aided Computer Software $195,050 2630-449 Technology Training (Professional Development) $25,000 2630-401 Summer Help $8,000 2630-415 Travel $2,400 2630-450 Supplies $4,000 2630-150 Instructional Staff (Technology integration teachers - 2) $195,000 2630-160 Non-instructional Staff (clerical staff - 9) $304,000 Total $2,247,358 Page 36 of 65 CCSD Technology Plan 2007–2010
    • Implementation Strategies Goal 6: Alignment of a spending plan that coincides with technology acquisitions and maximizes technology investments. Year 3 (2009–10) A summation of spending over the three-year plan will be determined and evaluated. Key areas of need for the next few years will be identified. In addition, data from the second year will be incorporated into spending determinations to make sure that the district technology needs for the following year are considered and met in the most cost-effective method possible. The proposed budget for the year includes the following key items: 2630-200 Equipment (Peripherals/accessories) $219,700 2630-400 Contract Services $880,000 2630-400 Contract State Lease (Hardware) $415,000 2360-460 State Aided Computer Software $195,050 2630-449 Technology Training (Professional Development) $25,000 2630-401 Summer Help $8,000 2630-415 Travel $2,400 2630-450 Supplies $4,000 2630-150 Instructional Staff (Technology integration teachers - 2) $202,000 2630-160 Non-instructional Staff (clerical staff - 9) $314,000 Total $2,265,150 Page 37 of 65 CCSD Technology Plan 2007–2010 L:Tech Staff2007 Tech PlanTech Plan 2007-10 Revision 2.doc
    • APPENDICES A. Network Diagrams 39 B. Blackboard Overview 46 C. Application Software Inventory 47 D. K-12 Software Evaluation –How to get new software 53 D. Acceptable Use Policy: K–4 58 E. Acceptable Use Policy: 5–12 62 Page 38 of 65
    • A. NETWORK DIAGRAMS Page 39 of 65
    • Appendices A. Network Diagrams Page 40 of 65 CCSD Technology Plan 2007–2010
    • Appendices A. Network Diagrams Page 41 of 65 CCSD Technology Plan 2007–2010 L:Tech Staff2007 Tech PlanTech Plan 2007-10 Revision 2.doc
    • Appendices A. Network Diagrams Page 42 of 65 CCSD Technology Plan 2007–2010
    • Appendices A. Network Diagrams Page 43 of 65 CCSD Technology Plan 2007–2010 L:Tech Staff2007 Tech PlanTech Plan 2007-10 Revision 2.doc
    • Appendices A. Network Diagrams Page 44 of 65 CCSD Technology Plan 2007–2010
    • Appendices A. Network Diagrams Page 45 of 65 CCSD Technology Plan 2007–2010 L:Tech Staff2007 Tech PlanTech Plan 2007-10 Revision 2.doc
    • B. BLACKBOARD OVERVIEW Blackboard Overview Blackboard is an integrated eLearning software platform that allows teachers to manage their courses, deliver course materials, streamline the homework process, communicate with students, encourage collaboration among students, create online assessments and post links to information on the Internet. Students have access to Blackboard anywhere and anytime that they connect to the Internet. The Blackboard online course management system enhances class communication, organization and presentation by providing customizable, pre- made web sites. Blackboard course sites enable faculty in the Chappaqua School District to: • Share important class documents, such as a syllabus, handouts, rubrics and lecture notes • Host online discussions and debates • Post a calendar with assignment due dates and exam schedules • Broadcast class announcements • Enhance and differentiate lessons with online videos, interactive notes, PowerPoint slides and more • Give more varied types of assessments • Allows for synchronous and asynchronous communication between teacher- student, student-teacher, teacher-teacher • Provides another forum for teacher to make connections between the real world and the classroom • Provides a place where students in different classes, in different grades and even in different schools can collaborate and work together • Redefines homework • Allow students to check their grades online • Share information with students and staff in extracurricular activities, sports and committees From its introduction in the Chappaqua Schools in January 2002, Blackboard's use continues to evolve. Page 46 of 65
    • C. APPLICATION SOFTWARE INVENTORY CCSD Application Software Inventory Products Subject Grade Level AC-DC Circuits V2.0 Science 9 - 12 Activstats V2.0 Math 9 - 12 Adobe Acrobat 5.0 Publishing K -12 Adobe Illustrator Art 5 - 12 Adobe InDesign Art Adobe Reader Publishing K -12 Adobe Pagemaker Publishing 9 -12 Adobe PhotoShop Art 5 -12 Adobe Photoshop Elements Art K-4 ArcView GIS Science 9 - 12 Athena V7.1 Library K-8 Auralia Music 5 - 12 Aurora 3.0 for Windows Special Education K -12 BASC V 1.1 Science K-2 Basic Circuits Challenge Science 5-8 Fizz & Martina's Math Adventures: Blue Falls Elementary Math K-4 Board Maker with Speaking Dynamically Pro Teacher Tool K-4 Cakewalk Home Studio Music 9 - 12 Career Zone Careers 5-8 Centennia Social Studies 9 - 12 CLEA Exercise - Moons of Jupiter Science 9 - 12 Conversions Plus Technology 9 - 12 DataStudio (Pasco) Science 5-8 DesignCAD 3D Max Technology 5-8 Dollars & Cents CD ROM - First Money Level I Special Education Dollars & Cents CD ROM - Spending Money - Level II Special Education Earobics Special Education K-4 Earth's Water Science K-4 EasyBook Deluxe Publishing Tool K-4 Edmark Reading Program Reading K-4 EM Field Science 9 - 12 Encarta Research K - 12 Fathom Science 9 - 12 Finale Music 5 - 12 Finale PrintMusic Music 5-8 Five Finger Typist Special Education K-4 Flash MX Animation 9 - 12 Food Processor Home Economics 5-8 Geometer's Sketchpad Math 5 - 12 Geometry Inventor Math 9 - 12 Glencoe Accounting Business 9 - 12 Page 47 of 65
    • Appendices C. Application Software Inventory CCSD Application Software Inventory Products Subject Grade Level Golden Book Encyclopedia Research K-4 Graph Club Math K-4 Home Design AS4000 Technology 5-8 Hyperstudio Graphics K-4 Inspiration Graphic Organizer 5 - 12 Interactive Physics Math 9 - 12 KidPix Graphics K-4 Kidspiration Graphic Organizer K-4 Learner Profile Teacher Tool K-4 Lexia Early Reading Reading K-1 Lexia Primary Reading Reading 1-2 Lexia Reading S.O.S. Reading 3-4 Logger Pro / Graphical Analysis Math 9 - 12 Math Keys (All) Math K-4 MathType Math 9 - 12 Microsoft Office XP Productivity Suite 9 - 12 MicroTest III Env. Sci. 6/E Science 9 -12 Music Ace 2 Music K-4 Musition Music 5-8 Neighborhood Map Machine Social Studies K-4 Nepsy Scoring Assistant Guidance K-4 Physics Quizzes Science 9 -12 Psychabilities Guidance 9 -12 Publisher Publishing K -12 Quicktime Multimedia K -12 RealPlayer Multimedia K -12 Science Court Science K-4 Seasons Science K-4 Shockwave Multimedia K -12 Sibelius Music 5-8 Sirs Mandarin Library 9 -12 Starry Night (Edu) Science 5-8 Student Writing Center Writing K-8 Studio LINX Video Editing K-4 Switch Games, Early & Adv. Special Education K-4 Tabletop Jr. Math K-4 Tabletop Sr. Math 5-8 Teacher Font Packs Graphics K -12 Testmaker (Biology) V6.40 Science 9 -12 TCC - Naviance Guidance 9 -12 TI Connect Science 9 -12 TI Graph Link Science 9 -12 Timeliner Social Studies 9 -12 Page 48 of 65 CCSD Technology Plan 2007–2010
    • Appendices C. Application Software Inventory CCSD Application Software Inventory Products Subject Grade Level UltraKey Typing K -12 Virtual TI Lab 9 -12 Visio Graphic Organizer 9 -12 Visual Studio Programming 9 -12 Wait-II Guidance 9 -12 Wiggleworks Reading K-2 WinZip Utility K -12 Wisc-III-Wait-II Scoring Assistant Guidance K-4 Wisc-III-Wait-II Writer Guidance 9 -12 Wizard TestMaker Science 9 -12 Page 49 of 65 CCSD Technology Plan 2007–2010 L:Tech Staff2007 Tech PlanTech Plan 2007-10 Revision 2.doc
    • Appendices C. Application Software Inventory Web-Based Subscription Resources Site Name Site Description American Civil War Reference comprehensive and wide ranging research options on this Library eBook compelling era of American history American Government comprehensive coverage on all aspects of American government from issues facing candidates to the underpinnings of our country's most influential social movements American History people, places, events, trends, statistics, news, culture, government, politics and environmental issues American National Biography profiles of more than 18,000 men and women from all walks of American life, who have influenced American history and culture AP Photo Archives image resource site from The Associated Press. AP Images is the world's largest bank of historical and recent photos Business & Company Resource company profiles and histories, brand information, rankings, Center investment reports, chronologies, periodicals, detailed industry news and information Business Plans handbook eBook collection of actual business plans compiled by entrepreneurs seeking funding for small businesses throughout North America CIAO (Columbia International source for theory and research in international affairs Affairs Online) Columbia Earthscape an interdisciplinary resource that connects earth and environmental sciences with their social, political and economic dimensions CQ Library social issues and Congressional news/analysis EbscoHost extensive periodical and newspaper databases with abstracts and full text Encarta online encyclopedia, dictionary, atlas, and homework help ERIC (Educational Resources index to professional education journals, dissertations, books and Information Center) technical reports Gale Encyclopedia of Alternative four volumes of current, unbiased information on alternative and Medicine eBook complementary medical practices Gale Encyclopedia of Genetic clear, complete information on genetic disorders, including Disorders eBook conditions, tests, procedures, treatments and therapies, in articles that are both comprehensive and easy to understand in language accessible to laypersons Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine comprehensive, in-depth medical guide for information on more eBook than 1,700 medical topics in language accessible to adult laypersons. Page 50 of 65 CCSD Technology Plan 2007–2010
    • Appendices C. Application Software Inventory Web-Based Subscription Resources Site Name Site Description Granger's World of Poetry poem search by title or topic, poetry glossary, poet biography searches Grolier Online three general encyclopedias and a science encyclopedia Grove Art Online comprehensive resource for visual arts from prehistory to present Health Reference Center a multi-source reference for health and wellness research (Academic) Hoover's Online comprehensive guide to business information InfoTrac Custom newspaper full-text newspaper database that lets you search newspapers electronically by title, headline, date, author, section or other assigned fields InfoTrac Jr. index to magazines and newspapers with full text articles Lit Finder includes quot;Essay Finderquot;, quot;Story Finderquot; and quot;Poem Finderquot; literary search engines MAPS 101 over 4,000 easy-to-print maps Medline bibliographic database of international biomedical literature National Newspaper Index indexes (1977-present) of NY Times, Wall Street Journal, Christian Science Monitor, LA Times and Washington Post NY State Newspapers a cooperative national effort among the states and the federal government to locate, catalog, and preserve on microfilm newspapers published in the United States from the eighteenth century to the present NY Times full text for the last 90 days only NY Times index only 1986 OmniFile a multi-disciplinary full text database of periodical articles Peterson's College Profiles information on accredited colleges and universities in the U.S. and Canada Peterson's Gradline information on graduate and professional programs in the U.S. and Canada Proquest Direct abstract and full text periodical and newspaper databases including the Christian Science Monitor PsycArticles full-text articles from American Psychological Association journals PsychInfo index to psychology journals, dissertations, books and technical reports Reader's Guide Abstracts index with abstracts of periodical articles, some with full text Page 51 of 65 CCSD Technology Plan 2007–2010 L:Tech Staff2007 Tech PlanTech Plan 2007-10 Revision 2.doc
    • Appendices C. Application Software Inventory Web-Based Subscription Resources Site Name Site Description Turn It In.com online tool for plagiarism prevention Twayne's Author Series content and critical interpretation of over 600 books in three series: US Authors, English Authors, World Authors World Book Online online reference material World Geography explore more than 200 countries-country profiles, history, source documents, maps, statistics, etc Page 52 of 65 CCSD Technology Plan 2007–2010
    • D. K-12 SOFTWARE EVALUATION – HOW TO GET NEW SOFTWARE Software which offers demonstrable benefit to grade level or department will receive preference over individual requests. 1. Preview or evaluation software can be ordered through your department/grade-level. First, put in a technology work order with the name of the potential software to check compatibility with the network, and then arrange with your department to order the software. If the software comes via a trial download rather than on disk, please include that information on the technology work order. Software can sometimes be ordered at no or low-cost for evaluation periods. Please be sure you understand the conditions before the order is placed. If the software is paid by the department or grade level and is subsequently approved by the software committee, the department will be reimbursed by the technology dept. 2. When the preview/evaluation software is received, speak to instructional specialists if installation is needed on a district computer. 3. After initial testing of the software a. Complete software evaluation document b. Arrange with a staff developer for follow-up interview c. Software evaluation committee will let you know when a decision has been made about your request 4. If approved, instructional specialists/staff developers will work with technology to plan installation. Evaluation Deadlines Notes October 1 – January 1 Step 1 Next Year’s This is when you should be evaluating software for Software Preview the coming year February 15 Step 2 Submit the software evaluation form Instructional Specialists July 1–August 30 Step 3 Software approved by the committee is generally installed during the summer October 1–March 1 Current Year Software Software requests under $1,000 will be considered for installation during the current school year, as network conditions permit. Page 53 of 65
    • Appendices D. K-12 Software Evaluation –How to get new software Software Title: ________________________________________________________________ Date: _________________ Name: (Evaluation Participant(s)) ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ Circle either Y or N to show how the software meets this criterion. Check the N/A box ONLY if this criteria is not applicable or relevant. Y/N N/A Pedagogy Additional Comment, if any Y N Objectives are clearly stated Y N Instructional design is based on strong pedagogy Y N Sequencing is appropriate Y N Learner can review content and correct responses Y N Content pacing and response prompts promote learner interaction Y N Presentation branches to harder/easier content based on learner responses Y N Assistance, suggested solutions and other approaches are provided to help learner Y N Items answered incorrectly are repeated later in the program Y N Learners can click on key terms for assistance Y N Content promotes interdisciplinary learning Y N Content reflects adopted curriculum Y N Content is free of racial/ethnic/gender bias Y N Content is age appropriate Y N Content is current and/or reliable Y N Content fully references sources Y N Content is unique (not in print or otherwise accessible in schools (i.e., a website Y N Learners compare/contrast various points of view Page 54 of 65 CCSD Technology Plan 2007–2010
    • Appendices D. K-12 Software Evaluation –How to get new software Circle either Y or N to show how the software meets this criterion. Check the N/A box ONLY if this criteria is not applicable or relevant. Y/N N/A Assessment Y N Pretest or placement for entry features Y N Ability to individualize a path of instruction, overriding program diagnostics as needed Y N Well designed assessment strategies Y N Clear feedback to the student regarding right and wrong answers Y N A variety of methods to chart student progress (reports for student, teacher and/or parent) Y N Record-keeping components for each learner Circle either Y or N to show how the software meets this criterion. Check the N/A box ONLY if this criteria is not applicable or relevant. Y/N N/A Teacher Support Materials Y N Provides lesson plans/guides/templates/homework Y N There are supporting materials or teacher aides available Y N Provides posters, maps, big books, manipulative- Y N Manual was available Print On-line Circle either Y or N to show how the software meets this criterion. Check the N/A box ONLY if this criteria is not applicable or relevant. Y/N N/A Ease of Use & Interactivity Additional Comment, if any Y N Ease of installation Y N Ease of initial use Y N On screen prompts and directions are easily understood Y N The program executes with a minimum amount of wait time Y N The program uses a consistent set of commands for navigation Y N Icons are consistent and offer many choices Y N Help screens are available and easy to use Y N Steps can be retraced Y N Printing is available Y N Saving is available Y N The program can be adapted for multiple skills levels Y N Graphics used in the program support the content objectives Y N Color images help learner Y N Sound(s) is appropriately selected and applied Page 55 of 65 CCSD Technology Plan 2007–2010 L:Tech Staff2007 Tech PlanTech Plan 2007-10 Revision 2.doc
    • Appendices D. K-12 Software Evaluation –How to get new software Y/N N/A Ease of Use & Interactivity Additional Comment, if any Y N Sound: read-aloud text is available Y N Multimedia is appropriately selected and meaningful Y N Correct spelling and grammar are used Circle either Y or N to show how the software meets this criterion. Check the N/A box ONLY if this criteria is not applicable or relevant. Y/N N/A Special Needs Y N Various learning styles are supported Y N Examples are provided to assist learners in evaluating information Y N Addresses a variety of learners’ special needs in specific and useful ways Y N Hearing impaired has text and/or closed caption Y N Partially sighted are able to vary print size or audio enhancement Y N Mouse click and /or keyboard commands for responses Y N Compatible with high tech assistive technology devices Circle either Y or N to show how the software meets this criterion. Check the N/A box ONLY if this criteria is not applicable or relevant. Y/N N/A Online Access Y N Learners can access websites to extend or enhance the activities in the software Y N Provides online resources for varied and meaningful purposes Y N Teachers are able to share resources or online Y N Website available or newsletter or forum is available teachers to exchange ideas and share concerns Y N Additional comments and/or features Page 56 of 65 CCSD Technology Plan 2007–2010
    • What process was used to evaluate the software? Dept/grade-level formal review Dept/grade-level Informal evaluation/ review Other (specify) ______________________________________________________________________ How will this software be used in the curriculum? (Check all that apply) To enhance teacher presentation of material To illustrate, elucidate material in the curriculum As a resource for teacher preparation of lessons To allow students to interact with/practice material in the curriculum As a primary source of material in the curriculum As a resource for students preparing projects, (textbook, etc.) homework How does this software compare with similar programs? What other similar programs have you compared this piece of software with, and what are its advantages? __________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________ We have not compared this program to others which accomplish the same goal because… Not aware of other programs which There is no shareware/freeware program or accomplish the same goal. Internet substitute for this software. Other: _____________________________ Installation When will this product be used? Throughout the year For this/these time period(s): How/where/how many students will use this product? _______ students each semester. Need it on classroom computers Need it on the machines in ____________ _____________________________________ for class purposes at____________ (lab/library/) (specify rooms & name of school) (name of school) We will require a site license for __________ Students will use this in the library or lab for computers (name of school ) research at _________ (name of school). How/where would faculty/staff use this product? ___teacher workstations ___dept office(s) Other school locations: (number) in Room(s)__________ (No. of PCs) in Room(s) _________ (specify) Would take home teacher licenses be needed?(Y/N)______ Does it warrant additional cost of at home licensing (Y/N) _______ What kind of assistance might faculty need? help learning to use the program help planning for implementation/integration of software have someone join as a co-teacher in the class when software is being used Page 57 of 65
    • D. ACCEPTABLE USE POLICY: K–4 Chappaqua Central School District Elementary School Guidelines for Student Computer and Internet Use Acceptable Use of our Computer Network and the Internet 2007/08 The Chappaqua Central School District employs computers as a tool to enhance its mission to teach the skills, knowledge, and behaviors students will need as successful and responsible adults. The district's computers provide unique opportunities to explore and use a varied and exciting set of resources, including computer programs, CDs, and the Internet. In order to make these resources available to everyone, the district expects that people who use the school's computers will do so in a way that is consistent with its educational mission. Specifically, we expect that, when using or accessing the school's computers: ♦ No person will deliberately or willfully cause damage to computer equipment or software or assist others in doing the same. ♦ No person will deliberately access educationally inappropriate materials or show others how to do the same. This is particularly important in light of the fact that the very strength of the Internet, it’s largely unregulated offering of thousands of different places to visit - means that some Internet sites contain sexually explicit or other material which is clearly unrelated to the school's educational mission. ♦ Each person will respect the rights of others to the privacy of the files stored on a computer or a disk and not view those files without the owner's permission or alter or damage such files. ♦ Each person will respect and uphold copyright laws. ♦ Each person will follow any other regulations posted in the computer lab or other room where computers are in use. ♦ Each person will follow the directions of the adult in charge of the computer lab or other room where computers are in use. The Internet The Chappaqua Central School District provides access to the Internet to support education and research. The Internet provides unique resources to students and teachers and offers an opportunity for collaborative work with other users. Any use of Chappaqua’s Internet access must be in support of Page 58 of 65
    • Appendices D. Acceptable Use Policy: K–4 and consistent with these educational objectives. All students who use Chappaqua’s Internet access are expected to read these Guidelines and/or to take part in a discussion of the Guidelines with a teacher. Adherence to the Guidelines is a condition for a student to have the privilege of Internet access. The Internet is a vast, global network, linking computers at universities, schools, laboratories, and other sites. Through the Internet, one can communicate with people all over the world through discussion forums and electronic mail. In addition, many educationally valuable files may be downloaded from the Internet. Because of its enormous size and resources, the Internet's educational potential is boundless. Because of its broad reach, however, the Internet also contains the potential for abuse. These Guidelines are intended to help ensure that students use this valuable resource in a safe and appropriate manner. Student’s Responsibility All student use of the Internet is to be conducted under faculty supervision. It is not possible, nor is it expected that faculty will monitor student use at every moment. Every student is expected to take individual responsibility for his or her appropriate use of the Internet. Student Access Before students in Grades K-4 will be authorized to access the Internet and World Wide Web, they will take part in a discussion of these Guidelines with their teacher. Teachers will be asked to sign a statement indicating that they have had such a discussion with their class. Students will be asked to sign a statement that they understand and agree to abide by the Guidelines. Network Etiquette Students are expected to learn and to abide by generally accepted rules of Internet network etiquette, as well as rules of school decorum. These include common courtesy, politeness, and the avoidance of inappropriate language. Personal Safety The Internet is accessible to the public. Unfortunately, this includes people who want to make contact with students for inappropriate purposes or under false pretenses. Although the Chappaqua School District tries its best to screen the Internet for such inappropriate uses via the use of filtering software, students must be cautious and prudent about supplying personal information and arranging personal meetings. In particular, students should never arrange a personal meeting with a person who was met on-line without their parents' or guardians' knowledge and approval. Students should Page 59 of 65 CCSD Technology Plan 2007–2010 L:Tech Staff2007 Tech PlanTech Plan 2007-10 Revision 2.doc
    • Appendices D. Acceptable Use Policy: K–4 promptly inform their teacher or school administrator of any on-line communication that the student feels is threatening, harassing, or otherwise inappropriate. Internet Access Is a Privilege Internet access through the Chappaqua Central School District is a privilege, not a right. A student's access may be canceled by school officials if this privilege is abused. Students demonstrating inappropriate conduct may be subject to other disciplinary action. Administrators’ Access to Student Files All student e-mail files and other Internet files and records may be accessed and examined by administrators for educational and administrative purposes, including the need to ensure that these Internet Guidelines are being followed. Administrators will also cooperate in providing access to student e-mail and Internet files and records to law enforcement authorities. Students should not assume that uses of the Chappaqua Central School District’s Internet access will be private. Disclaimer of Liability The Chappaqua Central School District disclaims all liability for the content of material that a student may access on the Internet, for any damages suffered in the course of or as a result of the student's Internet use, and for any other consequences of a student's Internet use. Changes in the Guidelines The Chappaqua Central School District reserves the right to change these Guidelines at any time. Revised 7/12/04 Page 60 of 65 CCSD Technology Plan 2007–2010
    • Appendices D. Acceptable Use Policy: K–4 CHAPPAQUA CENTRAL SCHOOL DISTRICT Signature Page For Teachers of Students in Grades K-4: I have discussed the Chappaqua Central School District Guidelines for Computer and Internet Use with my class on _____________ [date] Teacher's Name: __________________________________________ School: ___________________________ Grade: ______________ Signature: _______________________________________________ Today's Date: _______________ ................................................................................................................................ User Agreement and Parent Permission Form - 2007/08 As a user of the Chappaqua Central School District’s computer network, I hereby agree to comply with its Guidelines and rules and to communicate over the network in a responsible fashion, while honoring all relevant laws and restrictions. Student Signature: __________________________________________ As the parent or legal guardian of the minor student signing above, I grant permission for my son or daughter to access networked computer services such as electronic mail and the Internet. I understand that the rules and Acceptable Use Guidelines have been discussed with my child and those individuals and families may be held liable for not adhering to these guidelines. I understand that some materials on the Internet may be objectionable, but I accept responsibility along with my child’s teacher for guidance of Internet use, including setting and conveying standards for my daughter or son to follow when selecting, sharing or exploring information and media. Parent/Guardian Signature: ______________________________ Date: ________ Name of Student: ______________________________________Grade:________ School:___________________________________________________________ Street Address: ____________________________Home Telephone:__________ Page 61 of 65 CCSD Technology Plan 2007–2010 L:Tech Staff2007 Tech PlanTech Plan 2007-10 Revision 2.doc
    • E. ACCEPTABLE USE POLICY: 5–12 Chappaqua Central School District 5–12 Guidelines for Student Computer and Internet Use Acceptable Use of our Computer Network and the Internet 2007/08 The Chappaqua Central School District is pleased to offer access to a wide array of electronic resources on the computer network as a way of enhancing instruction and broadening the educational experience of its student body. In order to make these resources available to everyone, the district expects, in return, that users accessing the networked computers will do so in a way consistent with its educational mission. To gain access, users must agree to follow the school’s Acceptable Use Policy as outlined in this document. For students, a complete copy of the Acceptable Use Policy (AUP) must be signed by a parent or guardian and returned to the school before access to the network will be granted. What is expected? Users are responsible for appropriate behavior on the school’s computer network. General school rules for behavior and communications apply. It is expected that users will comply with district standards and the specific rules set forth below. The use of the network is a privilege, not a right, and may be revoked if abused. The user is personally responsible for all activity that originates from his/her account while accessing and utilizing the school’s computer resources. This means that users should not give their password to others nor should they access the network using another user’s account. Students are advised never to access, keep, or send anything that they would not want their parents or teachers to see. What are the rules? Appropriate Use We expect that when using the school’s computers, students will: ♦ No person will deliberately or willfully cause damage to computer equipment or software or assist others in doing the same. ♦ use the Internet only for educational purposes related to the curriculum ♦ use proper netiquette (appropriate language, keeping home information private, etc.) ♦ respect and uphold copyright laws ♦ be responsible for any activity that occurs on their accounts Page 62 of 65
    • Appendices E. Acceptable Use Policy: 5–12 ♦ be conscientious about using network storage space, periodically deleting unimportant or obsolete files Privacy Users should be aware that network administrators will review logs and may access data stored on the network to maintain system integrity. Illegal copying Users should never download or install any software -- commercial, shareware, or freeware on any computers or network drives, unless they have written permission from the network administrator. Nor should users copy other people’s work or intrude into other people’s files. Succinct Advice These are guidelines to follow to prevent the loss of network privileges at the Chappaqua Central School District: 1. Do not use a computer to harm other people or their work. 2. Do not damage the computer or the network in any way. 3. Do not interfere with the operation of the network by installing or downloading any programs. 4. Do not violate copyright laws. 5. Do not download, view, send, or display offensive messages or pictures. 6. Do not share your password with another person. 7. Do not waste limited resources such as disk space, printing capacity or Internet bandwidth. 8. Do not trespass in another’s folders, work, or files. 9. NOTIFY an adult immediately, if by accident, you encounter materials which violate the rules of appropriate use. 10. BE PREPARED to be held accountable for your actions and for the loss of privileges if the Acceptable Use Policy is violated. Disclaimer of Liability The Chappaqua Central School District disclaims all liability for the content of material that a student may access on the Internet, for any damages suffered in the course of or as a result of the student's Internet use, and for any other consequences of a student's Internet use. Changes in the Guidelines The Chappaqua Central School District reserves the right to change these Guidelines at any time. Page 63 of 65 CCSD Technology Plan 2007–2010 L:Tech Staff2007 Tech PlanTech Plan 2007-10 Revision 2.doc
    • Appendices E. Acceptable Use Policy: 5–12 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- User Agreement and Parent Permission Form - 2007/08 As a user of the Chappaqua Central School District’s computer network, I hereby agree to comply with its Guidelines and rules and to communicate over the network in a responsible fashion, while honoring all relevant laws and restrictions. Student Signature: _________________________________ Date: ___________ Name of Student:__________________________________ Grade: __________ School:__________________________________________ As the parent or legal guardian of the minor student signing above, I grant permission for my son or daughter to access networked computer services such as electronic mail and the Internet. I understand that the rules and Acceptable Use Guidelines have been discussed with my child and those individuals and families may be held liable for not adhering to these guidelines. Parent/Guardian Signature: __________________________ Date: ___________ Street Address: ____________________________Home Telephone: ___________ Page 64 of 65 CCSD Technology Plan 2007–2010
    • Technology Department Address General District Mailing Address Horace Greeley High School PO Box 21 70 Roaring Brook Road Chappaqua NY 10514 Chappaqua, NY 10514 For questions relating to the technology plan, contact: Darleen Nicolosi, Director of Instructional Technology Phone: (914) 861-9481 Fax: (914) 238-3197 E-Mail: darleen.nicolosi@ccsd.ws Plan Review Date: URL for Technology Plan: http://www.ccsd.ws/tech/ Document control 05/04/07 Submission to BOCES for plan approval ______________________________ Page 65 of 65