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  • Auf folie 14
  • Auf folie 14
  • Three Long Term Trends Eco: Global Networks ( + 50% outsource major fct (HR, Manu., Call Center, …)) Env: Resource Scarcity , Climate Change (-80% Carbon in ind. world) Env: Population growth (6.7 -> 9.2 B people in 2050) Soc: Awareness, Connectivity (23.5% of World use Web; 60% cell phones (15% in ‘02)); Soc: Accountability (1000s of NGOs, Ability to mobilize masses, Reporting peer pressure)
  • Kann man öffentlich zeigen
  • Zwei hilitest: procurement & smart grids
  • Usability Simplicity Low end devices Cultural background Functionality Business processes Use cases Vertical solutions Infrastructure Communication networks Power consumption SOA downsizing TCO HW needs Complexity (implementation, customization etc.) maintenance Business Models Production, deployment and distribution models (licensing, pricing, SaaS etc.) IT related services (maintenance, training etc.) ISVs, partner ecosystem Social acceptance Change management Cultural background
  • Usability Simplicity Low end devices Cultural background Functionality Business processes Use cases Vertical solutions Infrastructure Communication networks Power consumption SOA downsizing TCO HW needs Complexity (implementation, customization etc.) maintenance Business Models Production, deployment and distribution models (licensing, pricing, SaaS etc.) IT related services (maintenance, training etc.) ISVs, partner ecosystem Social acceptance Change management Cultural background
  • * http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bottom_of_the_pyramid ** Gibson S. (2007): Microfranchising: The next step on the development ladder . In: Fairborne et al (ed) (2007): Microfranchising: Creating wealth at the bottom of the pyramid *** Fairtrade Labelling Organizations International (2008): http://www.fairtrade.net/figures.html **** Prahalad, C.K (2004): The Fortune at the Bottom of the Pyramid. (Wharton School Publishing) ***** adapted from: Prahalad, C.K (2004): The Fortune at the Bottom of the Pyramid. (Wharton School Publishing)
  • Kann man öffentlich zeigen

Ict For Sustainable Economies- Dr. Terzidis - Digibiz'09 Ict For Sustainable Economies- Dr. Terzidis - Digibiz'09 Presentation Transcript

  • ICT for Sustainable Economies Guiding Ideas and Examples Dr. Orestis Terzidis Vice President SAP Research Karlsruhe
    • 1. Introduction
    • Smart Grids & More
    • Procurement in Emerging Economies
    Agenda
  • Sustainability The Role of IT
    • If you do not plant a forest today, future generations will harvest no wood.
    • The “Limits of growth” report applied that thinking to global economy and ecology.
    • Can IT make a difference?
  • SAP’s Léo Apotheker on Sustainability
    • “ SAP has made a long term, strategic commitment to sustainability. As a leader in business software, it’s our natural responsibility to both improve our sustainability performance and to enable our costumers to run more sustainable business processes globally – for the sake of the future generations.”
    • CEBIT 2009: The New Reality of Responsible Business
    • http:// www.cebit.de/cgc_keynotes?eventid =KEY31029
  • And some more Statements…
    • “ SAP has a unique opportunity to include sustainability into tomorrow’s best business practices and impact more than 80.000 customers”
    Jim Hagemann Snabe “ We have committed SAP to a journey of becoming more sustainable. We will do our part to secure the future.” Ernie Gunst “ The path to a more sustainable business is to holistically manage economic, environmental and social risks and opportunities.” Peter Graf
  • Sustainable Thinking: Triple Bottom Line © SAP 2009 / Page Natural resources, Climate change, Population growth Awareness, Connectivity, Accountability Global business networks Economic Environ- mental Social
  • Ratio Carbon Footprint SAP and it’s customers [Example: Carbon footprint SAP itself, SAP products, customers in Mio tons CO 2 e] SAP customers’ footprint* (SAP as enabler of sustainable business processes) ~40-45 SAP's own footprint (SAP as exemplar) ~ 0.5 Footprint of SAP's products in use** (SAP as enabler of Green IT) ~4,000-5,000 x 100 x 100 The CO 2 footprint of SAP’s customer base is about 10,000 times larger than that of SAP. * 75% of Fortune 1000 companies; ** Assume avg 1000 users per SAP 50,000 customers; Source: Team ESTIMATE 900
  • Sustainability Map Sustainability Performance Environment, Health and Safety Energy and Carbon Product Safety and Stewardship Sustainable Supply Chain Sustainable Workforce IT Infrastructure Compliance Competitiveness Environmental Compliance Occupational Health Industrial Hygiene & Safety Emergency Management Energy-efficient Assets Energy Management Carbon Management Smart Grids Product Compliance Material & Product Safety Recycling & Re-Use Recall Management Product Footprint Sustainable Design Procurement Traceability Commodity Trade & Risk Management Supply Chain Optimization Labor Compliance & Rights Diversity Talent Management Green IT Availability, Security, Accessibility & Privacy Resource Optimization Assured Reporting Benchmarking & Analytics Strategy & Risk Financial Performance
    • 1. Introduction
    • Smart Grids & More
    • Procurement in Emerging Economies
    Agenda
  • Changing Framework Example Germany
    • EU Directives became German Laws in 2005
    • Production
    • Liberalization
    • Subsidies for Renewable Energy and CHP
    • Exit from Coal an Nuclear
    • Gird
    • “ Natural Monopoly”
    • Regulated by Federal Grid Agency
    • From cost regulation to incentive regulation
    • Retail
    • Liberalization
    • Liberalization of Metering Services
    • Energy Efficiency Directives
  • A Set of New Technologies Creates New Possibilities
    • Production
    • Photovoltaic, Wind, Solar Thermal
    • Micro CHP, Fuel Cells
    • Gird
    • Power electronics, power flow control
    • High voltage DC transmission
    • Retail
    • Smart Metering
    • Power line communication
    • Smart Home
  • The New Environment Creates New Business Models
    • Production
    • Contracting
    • Virtual Power Plants
    • Grid
    • Dynamic Capacity Pricing
    • Retail
    • „ Saving Energy“ as product
    • Price signal & dynamic tarifs
    • From EEX to „eBay for Electricity“
    • Operate Infrastructures for Energy Services
  • Lighthouse Project E-Energy Overview Production Central/De-Central Transport/ Distribution Consumption Usage Procurement Retail/Sales Service (CRM) Integrated Solutions for Technical Operations Business-Level ICT based Solutions/Services Smart Generation Smart Grid Smart Customer TECHNOLOGIES : Using the potential of ICT (Smart Metering, Portals, Embedded Systems) Context and framework conditions (Legal, Security, Socioeconomics) E-Energy Marketplace ICT Solutions for Coupling the Levels E-Energy Operations/Maintenance
  • Goals of Intelligent Energy System Operation
    • Avoid peaks
    • Spread shoulders
    • Reduce consumption
    • Manage fluctuations from renewable energies and de-central production
    -25%
  • ICT is Key for Increasing The Energy Efficiency
    • Applying advanced ICT to the energy sector can save 2,03 billion tons of CO2 emissions per year.
    Yearly CO 2 saving potential through ICT (worldwide, billion tons) The Climate Group 2006
  • Internet of Energy An Open ICT Platform Overlay
    • Today
      • Few conventional large power plants serve many consumers
      • One way power flow: high/medium/low voltage
      • Centralized control paradigm
    • 2015: Consumer evolve into producers
      • More power plants with renewable
      • More de-central production
    • 2 020: Coordination through the IoE
      • Create an open standard-based ICT platform
  • BDI initiativ “ICT for the Energy Markets of the Future”
    • Two years of intense discussion
    • Consultations with
      • Invited experts
      • Federal ministries
      • Regulatory authority for the power grid
      • Research Union
      • Standardization organizations
    • English translation available soon
  • Heading Towards MInimum EMission REGions MEREGIO
    • One out of six „E-Energy“ lighthouses
      • Research project co-funded by the Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology
      • Duration: Jan 2009 – Dec 2012
    • Key issues
      • Development of an E-Energy marketplace as a coordination tool in decentralized (distribution) networks
      • Certification of energy efficient regions
    • Implementation
      • Field test with EnBW customers
      • Interaction between marketplace, business applications and meter data management realized in collaboration with IBM
  • SmartHouses Interacting with The SmartGrid
    • Part of the European ICT4EE efforts
      • EC co-funded research project
      • Duration: Sep 2008 – Feb 2011
    • Key issues
      • SmartHouses’ intelligent participation in a dynamic market-driven SmartGrid enhances energy efficiency
      • Adaptive home appliances and distributed energy sources coordinate operation via ICT
      • Strategies for mass adoption
    • Field trials in three countries
      • The Netherlands
      • Germany
      • Greece
  • Planned Electric Mobility Projects
    • Green Fleet @ SAP
      • Part of SAP‘s company car fleet to be switched to electric cars
      • Powered with 100% renewable energy
      • Fleet management
    • Further research projects are planned with different academic and industrial partners
      • Billing engine for e-mobility services, incl. roaming
      • Vehicle-to-grid incentive solutions
    • 1. Introduction
    • E-Energy & Smart Grids
    • Procurement in Emerging Economies
    Agenda
  • Emerging Economies Will Play a Major Role
    • Rapidly changing policy and business conditions
    • Ramp up of ICT infrastructure in emerging economies
    • Global companies must design solutions for these markets
    • "By 2015, IT engineered for developing economies will drive 20% of disruptive IT innovation worldwide“ (Gartner, 2006).
    0 2 4 6 8 10 Billions 2005 2020 2050 World Population Developing World Developed World
  • Emerging markets Nokia
    • 68 %*
    • *Nokia‘s growth rate 2006 on mobile device market in Africa/Middle East (source: Nokia financial report 2007)
  • Emerging markets Where the Lights are not yet on Brazil China Colombia India Lebanon Africa except Egypt, Morocco, South Africa Mexico Romania Russia Bulgaria Turkey Rest of Latin America Rest of Middle East Countries with predicted growth rates > 15% in 2007-2010
  • BRICS FOCUS Market Size in BRICS BRICS Macro Economics Overview
    • In 2007, BRICS had a population of 2,829bn and a combined GDP of $14,370bn (=trillion)
    • Estimated that BRICS GDP will equal that of G7 countries by 2020
    • Estimated number of SMEs in BRICS - >25m
    • Average contribution of 34% to BRICS GDP
    • Contribution to employment in excess of 60%
    Extracted from various sources
  • Need for Appropriate and Contextual Relevant ICT Products and Services … Although it is clear that there are large differences in assumptions related to the cost, power, and usage, there has been little work on how technology needs in developing regions differ from those of industrialized nations.” (1)
    • The case for Technology in Developing Regions, IEEE Computer Society, June 2005-08-21
    ‘ First World’ technology to date has been a poor fit in these areas, and that there is a need for technology research for developing regions…
  • Dimensions of Targeted Solutions Concept
      • Engineering target point
    Emerging economy Developed economy
  • Examples for Low Cost High Tech solutions Tata Nano One Laptop Per Child
    • Lightweight low end device
    • Black and white screen, dust resistant, built in torch
    • 35€ in India
    • Community features, 5 phone books, cost transparency for shared usage
    • 188$
    • Hardware and software concept
    • NetBook frontrunner
    Nokia 1200
    • $ 1600
    • Indian target market
  • Project C@R Collaboration at Rural Background EU FP6 research project Cooperation SAP – CSIR/Meraka Scope ~ 30 Spaza Shops, 4 Entrepreneurs Best Practices for Rural Africa Viable business models Mechanisms Applying Open Innovation mechanisms based on Living Lab principle Sekhukhune Rural Living Lab South Africa Challenge Business case for small enterprises at the bottom of the pyramid (BoP)
  • Envisioned Impact
    • Sekhukhune Living Lab interventions aim to create impact on operational excellence of small and micro enterprises by to the point efficiency and effectiveness gains:
    • establishment of economies of scale that overcomes the problem of critical size
    • bridging 2nd and 1st economy gaps that cause inaccessibility of profitable markets
    • reduction of transactional costs caused by remoteness, bad infrastructure and limited resources,
    • employment of entrepreneurs providing ICT services that haven’t been accessible in rural areas so far
    Christina Zikhali, Spaza Shop Owner Ishmael Adams, Infopreneur Hansie du Plessis, Sasko Bakeries
  • The Role of the Informal Sector (2 nd economy) in Developing Economies Characteristics of this sector: No access to credit and capital Weak networks Low productivity and efficiency Poor working conditions Inadequate supply and marketing Low level of education and skills Inadequate infrastructure Legal hurdles wrt formalization Harrassment What is the informal economy? Economists: „unobserved economy“ Labor advocates: „ unorganized economy“ Social advocates: „ unprotected economy“ Statistical authorities: „ uncounted economy“ EXCLUSION Informal employment as perc. of non-agicultural employment:
  • Sustainable Business Mechanisms for the “Bottom of the Pyramid” (BOP)
    • In economics, the bottom of the pyramid is the largest, but poorest socio-economic group.
    • In global terms, these are the four billion people who live on less than $2 per day, typically
    • in developing countries.
    • The phrase “bottom of the pyramid” is used in particular by people developing new models
    • of doing business that deliberately target that demographic, often using new technology.*
    Prominent successful examples include: Micro credit Organizations such as the Grammeen Bank in Bangladesh: In 2004, 3164 micro credit institutions serviced some 92 million clients in developing countries** Microfranchising - a specific BOP concept: Fair trade Organizations such as the Fairtrade Labeling Organizations International In 2007, Fair trade certified sales amounted to approx. € 2.3 billion worldwide, a 47% year-to-year increase*** Other examples come from a diverse range of sectors such as: Agriculture, health care, ICT, retail, housing, etc. **** *****
  • Use Case Virtual Buying Cooperatives Infopreneur Spaza Shop Supplier
    • Order placement
      • Mobile Ordering
    • Order Management
      • Order tracking & brokering
      • Analytics
    • Mediator
      • Business enabler
      • Connector between 2nd and 1st economy
    • Order processing
      • Delivery
      • Payment
    Supplier Supplier Microfranchisee Microfranchise 2nd Economy 1st Economy
  • IT Can Make a Difference [Example: Carbon footprint SAP itself, SAP products, customers in Mio tons CO 2 e] SAP customers’ footprint* (SAP as enabler of sustainable business processes) ~40-45 SAP's own footprint (SAP as exemplar) ~ 0.5 Footprint of SAP's products in use** (SAP as enabler of Green IT) ~4,000-5,000 x 100 x 100 The CO 2 footprint of SAP’s customer base is about 10,000 times larger than that of SAP. * 75% of Fortune 1000 companies; ** Assume avg 1000 users per SAP 50,000 customers; Source: Team ESTIMATE 900
  • Thank you
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