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Strip Casting Steel  Dierk  Raabe
 

Strip Casting Steel Dierk Raabe

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Advances in the optimization of thin strip cast austenitic 304 stainless steel microstructures

Advances in the optimization of thin strip cast austenitic 304 stainless steel microstructures

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    Strip Casting Steel  Dierk  Raabe Strip Casting Steel Dierk Raabe Presentation Transcript

    • 1
      Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung, ThyssenKrupp
      Advances in the optimization of thin strip cast austenitic 304 stainless steel microstructures
      D. Raabe1), R. Degenhardt2), R. Sellger2), B. Sander1),
      W. Klos2), M. Sachtleber2), L. Ernenputsch2)
      Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung, Max-Planck-Str. 1, 40237 Düsseldorf, Germany
      2) ThyssenKrupp Nirosta GmbH, 47797 Krefeld, Germany
    • 2
      Overview
      • Introduction
      • Experimental
      • Strip casting microstructure
      • In-line forming strategies
      • Conclusions
    • 3
      Introduction and motivation
    • 4
      Introduction and motivation
    • 5
      Process specific features of strip cast (AISI 304)
      • Higher solidification rate
      • Higher and locally different heat flux
      • Much lower hot reduction
      • Properties of final product: cleaner, better corrosion resistance, weldable, good forming behaviour, lower anisotropy, good surface finish
      • New grades
    • 6
      Overview
      • Introduction
      • Experimental
      • Strip casting microstructure
      • In-line forming strategies
      • Conclusions
    • 7
      3D electron – microscopy, 3D EBSD, texture
    • 8
      Normal
      Rolling
      Principle of measurement
      phase content
      Texture, austentite
      Local misorientation (KAM1)
      IQ and interfaces
      Local misorientation (KAM1)
      Texture, ferrite and martensite
    • 9
      Sheer normal
      Martensite
      (sharp)
      Delta
      (round)
      Rolling
      Details from electron microscopy
      Texture ferrite and martensite
      Phase
    • 10
      Martensite
      (strong distorsion)
      Martensite
      (strong distorsion)
      Details from electron microscopy
      Texture austentite
      Local misorientation (KAM1)
    • 11
      ThyssenKrupp Nirosta, Krefeld Strip Casting Plant
    • 12
      Overview
      • Introduction
      • Experimental
      • Strip casting microstructure
      • In-line forming strategies
      • Conclusions
    • 13
      304, 1.4301 Strip casting microstructure
    • 14
      Overview
      • Introduction
      • Experimental
      • Strip casting microstructure
      • In-line forming strategies
      • Conclusions
    • 15
      Increase in equivalent strain and temperature
      Normal
      Rolling
      In-line forming
    • 16
      In-line forming and final heat treatment
    • 17
      In-line forming and final heat treatment
    • 18
      700
      600
      500
      400
      Stress [N/mm²]
      300
      200
      100
      0,00
      0,00
      10
      20
      30
      40
      50
      60
      70
      80
      Strain [%]
      Mechanical properties, deformation martensite
    • 19
      Mechanical properties, deformation martensite
      Phase discrimination+pattern quality+grain boundaries
    • 20
      Conclusions
      • Austenitic 304 stainless steels can be produced by thin strip casting, in-line hot rolling, and subsequent heat treatment with equivalent mechanical properties and even better microstructure homogeneity than steels produced by the conventional thick slab processing route.
      • The formation of deformation-induced α‘ martensite in austenitic stainless steels produced by the thin strip casting route is similar as in conventionally produced 304 steels.
      • Precise characterization of the different phases, interfaces, and crystallographic textures can be conducted by using a high resolution EBSD method.
    • references
      D. Raabe, M. Hölscher, F. Reher, K. Lücke: Scripta Metall. 29 (1993) 113116, Textures of strip cast Fe-16% Cr
      D. Raabe, M. Hölscher, M. Dubke, H. Pfeifer, H. Hanke, K. Lücke: Steel Research 4 (1993) 359363, Texture development of strip cast ferritic stainless steels
      D. Raabe, K. Lücke: Mater. Sc. Techn. 9 (1993) 302312, Textures of ferritic stainless steels
      D. Raabe: Metal. Mater. Trans. A 26A April (1995) 991998, Microstructure and crystallographic texture of strip cast and hot rolled austenitic stainless steel
      D. Raabe: Mater. Sc. Techn. 11 (1995) 461468, Textures of strip cast and hot rolled ferritic and austenitic stainless steel
      D. Raabe: Acta Mater. 45 (1997) 11371151, Texture and microstructure evolution during cold rolling of a strip cast and of a hot rolled austenitic stainless steel
      D. Raabe, R. Degenhardt, R. Sellger, W. Klos, M. Sachtleber, L. Ernenputsch: Steel Res. Int. 79 (2008) 440-444, Advances in the optimization of thin strip cast austenitic 304 stainless steel microstructures
      21