Linking e-learning tools with experiential knowledge production in  Higher Education teaching-learning processes: The case of open  source LMS
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Linking e-learning tools with experiential knowledge production in Higher Education teaching-learning processes: The case of open source LMS

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Despite requirements for constant innovation in Higher Education, the application of ...

Despite requirements for constant innovation in Higher Education, the application of
knowledge management constitutes a recent research field in this sector while a wide range of e-learning
tools - like open source learning management systems (LMS) - constitute a basic part of universities
infrastructures at present. As knowledge derived from direct experiences is one of the most important
sources for innovations, this paper presents two approaches for experiential knowledge production in the
Higher Education teaching-learning processes: (1) the managerial production approach and (2) the open
production approach. In accordance with these approaches, the paper also describes how Moodle and Sakai -
two of the most widely used open source LMS - support experiential knowledge production and concludes
that: (1) these LMS don’t have first class constructs to manage experiential knowledge production related
concepts; (2) experiential knowledge related constructs can be represented through existing artifacts included
in these LMS but this approach presents many limitations to support explicit connections between these
constructs and; (3) LMS can extend current capabilities of tags or similar artifacts to represent high level
meaning structures that link content from different LMS tools.

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Linking e-learning tools with experiential knowledge production in Higher Education teaching-learning processes: The case of open source LMS Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Linking e-learning tools with experiential knowledge production in Higher Education teaching-learning processes: The case of open source LMS MSc. Didiosky Benítez-Erice Prof. Dr. Frederik Questier Prof. Dr. Dalgys Luján-Pérez Prof. Dr. Chang Zhu Departamento de Tecnología Educativa Department of Educational SciencesUniversidad Central “Marta Abreu” de Las Villas (UCLV) Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB) Santa Clara, Cuba Brussels, Belgium
  • 2. Are they connected today? Students’ Experiences Higher Education Open Innovation Source LMS
  • 3. Research Questions1. How students’ experiential knowledge is produced in Higher Education teaching-learning process?2. To what extent do open source learning management systems support such production?
  • 4. Experiential KnowledgeRefer to things perceived from concrete experiences,things tacitly (or implicitly) learned or acquired aftera period of reflection on experiences (Eraut 1994;Storkerson 2009).
  • 5. The nature of students´ experiential knowledge Apprehension of Learning Tasks • Participants • Situation In the light of • Used Practices Comprehension of the new information • Process Teaching-Learning Experience • Practical Use of Concepts • Self Types of Teaching-Learning experiences: Attention to a ₋ Course Teaching-Learning ₋ Area of study Experience ₋ Academic year ₋ Subject ₋ Topic ₋ Lesson (or equivalents) ₋ Task
  • 6. Managerial Approach Students accumulate Students involve in joint Students build experientialexperiential knowledge activities and knowledge claims inby doing learning tasks share personal experiences cooperation with others Teachers justify the value of produced experiential knowledge claims based on The Organizational Knowledge Creation Theory (Nonaka and Takeuchi, 1995)
  • 7. Open Approach Students use existing Students involve inexperiences to accomplish * Include problem claim formulation, problem-solving tasks to close learning tasks knowledge claim formulation and its experiential gaps (*) validation. Stakeholders eliminate errors in produced experiential knowledge claims based on The New Knowledge Management (Firestrone & McElroy, 2003)
  • 8. Moodle (2.2) support forstudents´experiential knowledge Problem and knowledge claims Sharing personal knowledge Knowledge claims evaluation formulation• Chat (message) • Chat (message + chat reports) • Blogs (comments)• Blogs (entry) • Forum (topic + replies) • Assignments (grade or feedback)• Wiki (page) • Wiki (page + history) • Wiki (comments)• Notes (note) • Blogs (entry + comments) • Forum (ratings)• Assignments (response) Connecting claims • Wiki (page links) • Tags (blog post tags)
  • 9. Sakai (CLE 2.7) support for students´experiential knowledge Problem and knowledge claims Sharing personal knowledge formulation Knowledge claims evaluation • Blogs (entry + comments)• Blogs (entry) • Chat Room (message + history) • Blogs (comments)• Chat Room (message) • Forum (topic + threads + replies) • Forum (grade or comments)• Mailtool (email) • Portfolios (content + comments) • Portfolios (comments)• Wiki (page) • Wiki (page + history) • Wiki (comments)• Messages (message)• Podcasts (audio or video files)• Portfolios (content) Connecting claims • Wiki (page links)
  • 10. Conclusions1. These LMS (Moodle and Sakai) don’t have a first class construct to manage experiential knowledge production related concepts.2. Experiential knowledge related constructs can be represented through existing artifacts included in these LMS but this approach presents various limitations to support explicit connections between these constructs.3. Wikis provide full support to experiential knowledge production in these LMS.4. LMS can extent current capabilities of tags or similar artifacts to represent high level meaning structures that link content created with different LMS tools.
  • 11. Merci! Thanks! This presentation can be found athttp://www.slideshare.net/didioskybe
  • 12. Credit of Pictures• Santa Clara University• Vrije Universiteit Brussel• Image from Horia Varlan• Image and Logo from Moodle• Image and Logo from Sakai