Sneaking Scala through the Back Door

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Presented at CodeMash 2014. Not everyone works for a company like Netflix -- a company where developers can bring in new technologies and languages through the front door via Freedom and Responsibility. This presentation is an update from my OSCON presentation, reflecting some additional thoughts

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  • Know when to stop. Consider how important it is to you. Were your arguments valid? Were they heard? Were there good counterpoints?
  • If all else fails
  • Invite the audience to relate stories.
  • Sneaking Scala through the Back Door

    1. 1. Sneaking Scala through the Back Door Dianne Marsh CodeMash 2014
    2. 2. Try the Front Door
    3. 3. DO Know the “Why”
    4. 4. DO Be specific: team, application, big gest concerns
    5. 5. DO Present from audience’s point of view
    6. 6. DON’T Use buzzwords
    7. 7. DO Emphasize high value points
    8. 8. DO Represent success stories
    9. 9. Typesafe Customers
    10. 10. Records AWS History Open Source Scala Edda Freedom & Responsibility
    11. 11. Killer Apps • Play for web (Scala and Java) • Akka for concurrency • Object-oriented + mathematical modeling = good fit for Scala
    12. 12. Domains • Business Intelligence • Social apps • Border security • eCommerce • Anti-spam • Advertising
    13. 13. Companies say ... • Rapid development and productivity • Asynchronous stateless scalabilty • Massive configurability for peak load • Reduces time to market • DSL reduces load on devs
    14. 14. DO Anticipate objections
    15. 15. About Hiring … • “Easy to find very good Java engineers and excite them with new technologies” • “Look for smart, energetic engineers eager to learn” • “No prior knowledge of Java, productive 2-3 weeks into project” • “Quickly productive with Scala” • “Reduces time to market”
    16. 16. DO Use Scala for new development
    17. 17. DO Leverage existing Java code
    18. 18. DON’T Convert all legacy code immediately* *(maybe never)
    19. 19. DO Use Scala as a Better Java
    20. 20. DO Use Scala for nonproduction code
    21. 21. DON’T Refer to code written before 2.9
    22. 22. DON’T Make your code too terse
    23. 23. DON’T val nums = 3 until 1000 val somenums = nums filter (x => (x % 3 == 0 || x % 5 ==0)) (0/:somenums)(_+_)
    24. 24. “When your Scala looks like unhappy emoticons, you’ve gone too far.” -- Jason Swartz, Netflix
    25. 25. DO Discuss developer productivity
    26. 26. DO Draw from team’s experience
    27. 27. DO Use Scala to attract candidates
    28. 28. DO Try ScalaTest
    29. 29. DON’T Stress about functional perfection
    30. 30. DO Try Typesafe Activator
    31. 31. DON’T Start with Scalaz
    32. 32. DO Learn about parallel collections
    33. 33. DO Leverage TypeSafe’s support
    34. 34. DON’T Be a language zealot
    35. 35. DO Know when to fold
    36. 36. MAYBE Ease into functional with Guava
    37. 37. DO Get feedback from others
    38. 38. Contact Info @dmarsh dmarsh@netflix.com (We are hiring)
    39. 39. Additional References • • • • • • Making a persuasive argument: http://sixminutes.dlugan.com/logos-examples-speaking/ Atomic Scala at http://atomicscala.com Learn Scala with the Koans at http://scalakoans.org Integrate testing with Scalatest: http://www.scalatest.org/ Case studies: http://typesafe.com/company/casestudies Futures and promises in 2.10: https://speakerdeck.com/heathermiller/futures-and-promisesin-scala-2-dot-10

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