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Values missionvision

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  • Welcome back! This presentation is Values, Mission, and Vision.
    Handouts of the charts have been distributed, so it would be a good idea to make notes of key points and discussion items right on your handouts.
    You can feel free to ask questions at any time. I’ll also reserve some time at the end of the presentation to answer questions.
    Before we get going, though, let me explain my totem.
    I’m a Bobwhite, as you can plainly see. I took my Wood Badge course in 1988 at the Pine Hill Scout Reservation in South Jersey. Our course number was NE-IV-44 and there were 7 of us in the patrol, represented by the 7 ruffled feathers. We each personalized our totem by adding our initials.
  • As a result of this session, you will:
    Understand what is meant by values, mission, and vision
    Review the values, mission, and vision of Scouting
    Consider values, mission, and vision, in the context of leadership
    Learn about the Wood Badge Ticket
    Begin writing your own Wood Badge Ticket based upon your personal values, vision and mission
  • In the 1300s at Cambridge University in England, a chapel was constructed for one of the colleges. The vaulted roof supported huge beams fashioned out of old-growth oak.
    Seven hundred years later, the beams had deteriorated to the point that the roof was in danger of collapsing. The building required extensive renovation, including replacing the beams. But where, in our time, could those repairing the building find giant oak trees of such an age and quality as had been available to the original builders?
    The answer lay right outside the door of the chapel. The original builders of the chapel had known that at some point far in the future, the structure would need new oak beams, and so they had planted acorns in the churchyard. Over the centuries, a grove of oak trees had grown to full maturity.
    The mission of those chapel builders – to ensure the survival of the chapel – extended hundreds of years into the future.
    Their vision – planting the acorns as a means of achieving the mission – was a step-by-step process that required planning and organization.
    Their mission and their vision were built upon their values – a solid foundation that gave direction and meaning to those things they set out to achieve.
  • In your own words, what is the definition of values?
    (Use flipchart to record responses)
  • Values … are core beliefs or desires that guide or motivate our attitudes and actions
  • (Use flipchart to record responses)
  • Values can take a variety of forms. For example:
    Principles or standards
    “Service Above Self” (Rotary Club International)
    “Be Prepared”
    “Do A Good Turn Daily” ...
    Personal Qualities
    Honesty
    Communication
    Being Organized
  • Character Traits
    Loyalty, enthusiasm, openness to others
    Codes of Ethics
    Hippocratic Oath
    Ten Commandments
    BSA’s Outdoor Code ...
    Goals
    Living a healthy life
    Caring for others
    Earlier today you gave thought to Scouting’s aims, ideals, and methods -- the AIMs of this organization. The expressions of Scouting’s ideals are articulated most clearly in the Scout Oath and the Scout Law. You find them posted in the room.
  • The Scout Oath and The Scout Law are statements of Scouting’s Values
    Before arriving at this course, you were asked to complete a pre-course assignment, answering twenty questions about yourself. Your answers can help you understand what your values are.
    Look again at Question 20: What are the most important values I use to guide and motivate my actions.
    (Copies of the instructions and 20 questions are in your participant notebook to review and complete if you have not done so already)
  • (read statement)
    Harvey and Lucia are the authors of “Walk the Talk” books
  • (Use flipchart to record responses)
  • A mission is a brief statement that reflects the core values of an organization.
    A mission communicates an organization’s long-term objectives
    – it tells us why the organization exists.
  • A mission statement clearly and concisely identifies the task or change that a person or group is to perform.
    A Mission Statement …
    Serves as a communication tool for an organization
    Aligns people with a purpose; it fosters commitment and unity
    Defines directions for change and growth
    Serves as an evaluation tool to help measure activities and programs
  • Here are some sample Mission Statements.
    “To establish Starbucks as the premier purveyor of the finest coffee in the world while maintaining our uncompromising principles as we grow” – Starbucks Coffee
    “To solve unsolved problems innovatively” – 3M
    “To offer all the fine customers in our territories all of their household needs in a manner in which they continue to think of us fondly” – Wal-Mart
  • Mission Statements often supported by lists of Corporate Values.
    Here are the values espoused by the Merck corporation.
  • Mission Statements often supported by lists of Corporate Values.
    Here are the values espoused by the Disney corporation.
  • This is the Mission Statement of the Boy Scouts of America.
  • Again, in your own words, what is a vision?
    (Use flipchart to record responses)
  • A vision is a picture of future success.
    A vision forms when we think far enough ahead to realize there will be important challenges that we can prepare for now.
    Your vision should be
    … your dream!
    “Blue Sky”
  • “Nothing happens unless first a dream.”
    – Carl Sandburg
    Part of your assignment prior to coming to this Wood Badge course was to think about your own vision of future success, especially as it relates to your primary leadership position in Scouting.
    Question 18: In five years, what role do I see for myself in Scouting?
    Likewise, earlier today during the discussion of the AIMS of Scouting, you were asked to think of young people who are currently involved with Scouting and to imagine them years in the future.
    That’s how vision begins – thinking about what we can offer young people today through Scouting that will have a positive impact upon their lives in a decade, in twenty years, in thirty years or more.
    That’s a vision that challenges each of us to do something of value for the future. Through Scouting, that vision encourages each of us to plant acorns.
  • Show video clips with separate slide for each
  • (play video) John F. Kennedy: “We choose to go to the moon.”
    (He challenged Americans to reach the moon within the decade of the 1960s.)
  • (play video) Martin Luther King: “I have a dream.”
    (He envisioned a nation where children would be judged by the content of their character rather than the color of their skin.)
  • (play audio) Margaret Thatcher: “I cannot manage the past. There are other people in my government who manage the present. It is my unique responsibility as the leader to shine the spotlight on the future and marshal the support of countrymen to create the future.”
    (She understood that vision is a tool of leadership)
  • (play video) Baden-Powell: (He saw the need to provide young people with opportunities to grow into the best possible adults.)
    Baden-Powell served as a general during the Boer War, a campaign that was a dismal failure for the British military. Returning to England from Africa after the war, Baden-Powell began searching for ways to provide the British Army with young men who were better prepared, both in character and ability, to serve their country. Through his books and the establishment of the Boy Scout movement, he felt he was succeeding in fulfilling that vision.
    The first World Jamboree took place in 1920. Baden-Powell was invited, but was initially not enthused. But he went anyway, and while he was there, his vision changed. Why? What happened in recent English history? World War I, a war that had taken the lives of hundreds of thousands of soldiers on both sides of the lines.
    At the World Jamboree, Baden-Powell saw boys from many nations living together in harmony. His vision for the future of Scouting evolved, and for the rest of his life he put his heart and soul into promoting the world brotherhood of Scouting.
    In 1937 there was a World Jamboree in the Netherlands. Just before it opened, one nation sent word that its boys would not be attending. That nation was Germany. Scouting had been disbanded in Germany, and many of its members had joined the Hitler Youth.
    Baden-Powell died in 1941, greatly disappointed that he had not realized the fulfillment of his vision of a world brotherhood of Scouts living in peace.
    Did Baden-Powell’s vision die with him? No, of course it didn’t. To this day we continue to work toward that dream.
  • Here are the criteria for a meaningful vision:
    A vision engages the heart and the spirit. “I have a dream!”
    A vision leads toward a worthwhile objective. “We will go to the moon.”
    A vision provides an effort with meaning. “My troop will have an exciting outdoor program within 18 months.”
    A vision is simple.
    A vision is attainable.
    A vision can change. Baden-Powell’s vision changed from
    … seeing young men prepared in character and ability to server their country.
    to
    … a world brotherhood of Scouts living in peace.
    Effective leaders have the capability to create a compelling vision, but they must also be able to translate that vision into reality.
  • This is the vision of the Boy Scouts of America.
  • Values -- Core beliefs or desires that guide or motivate our attitudes and our actions.
    Mission – Encapsulates the values and articulates the overall, long-term objective..
    Vision – A picture of success and the related plan of action.
    Ask the question: “What is the challenge of expressing Values, Vision, and Mission.”
    (Wait for responses)
    Articulating personal values, missions, and visions is not an easy task. It requires lots of thought, some personal examination, and perhaps getting feedback from others.
  • A vision without a mission is just a dream …
    A mission without a vision just passes the time …
    A vision with action can change the world.
    (Transition to the Wood Badge Ticket)
    Now it’s your turn to begin developing a vision and considering the mission that will allow you to make that vision a reality. That’s at the heart of the Wood Badge ticket. Along the way, you are likely to discover that the values of Scouting form the foundation of your vision and mission.
  • During the Course Overview earlier this afternoon, you learned a little about the Wood Badge ticket. Historically, British soldiers “worked their tickets” -- taking the steps that would help them achieve the goal of reaching home at the end of their military service.
    The Wood Badge Ticket allows each of you to set out a personal vision and mission based on your own values. You will be envisioning an end result and figuring out the steps required to fulfill that vision.
    Writing it out and then “working” your ticket provides a way for each of you to put into practice the leadership skills you are learning during this Wood Badge course, and to transfer those skills to your home units, districts, and councils.
    Your answers on the pre-course assignment, Twenty Questions, will have helped you think through what is important to you, what roles you play in Scouting and in your life, and where you see yourself in the future. That deepened awareness forms a pool of information you can use as you begin to formulate your ticket.
  • A Wood Badge Ticket is:
    A commitment
    A vision of personal improvement
    A vision of how you will lead
    A series of goals
    Your ticket is guided by
    Your Personal Values
    Your Vision
    Your Personal Mission
    (Guidelines for Writing a Wood Badge Ticket)
    A primary purpose of the Wood Badge experience is to provide leadership for Scouting and leadership for America. Your ticket is a commitment to complete a set of goals that will significantly strengthen the BSA program in which you are involved. Additionally, the ticket provides an opportunity for you to practice the leadership skills that will be of value in the many areas of your life, both within and beyond Scouting.
  • Translating your Vision to Reality ...
    1. Prepare a Personal Values Statement
    2. Prepare a Vision Statement
    3. Prepare your Mission - your steps
    Goal -- Do all three by the conclusion of this weekend on Monday afternoon!
    Again Values, Vision, and Mission are defined:
    Values -- Core beliefs or desires that guide or motivate our attitudes and our actions. Our values are set before we even heard of the Scout Oath and Law. State what they are.
    Vision -- Articulates the summit you want to reach.
    Mission -- The means (steps) of reaching that summit you set in your vision. Come up with six or seven steps. Your mission is a specific statement of how you intend to carry out your vision.
  • Your ticket will include five significant goals:
    The goals will be written in support of your current Scouting responsibilities and should be designed to provide maximum positive impact for youth membership.
    At least one of the goals will incorporate some aspect of Diversity. Possibilities include goals that promote diversity in units, districts, and/or councils; that encourage a more diverse BSA membership; and/or that help young people better understand the nature and importance of diversity in Scouting and in America. (This will be discussed in detail on Day Four during the presentation on Valuing People and Leveraging Diversity.)
    If you wish, one goal of the five goals may involve developing and applying a self-assessment tool to measure your progress and effectiveness in relation to the other goals on your ticket. (This will be discussed in detail on Day Five during the presentation on Self-Assessment.)
    This is all written for what? … your primary registered position
    Your goals will provide maximum positive impact for who? … the youth membership
  • The goals written for your ticket should be SMART
    Specific
    Measurable
    Attainable
    Relevant
    Time-Based
  • For each goal, you will also indicate:
    Who
    What
    Where
    When
    How
    Why
    How Verified
  • The Troop Guide assigned to your patrol will give you guidance in the preparation of your ticket. Forms such as this are available for your use. One is found in your participant’s notebook.
    For each goal answer the seven questions: Who, What, Where, When, How, Why, and How Verified.
  • Working Your Ticket ...
    5. You must complete a ticket and obtain approval from your Troop Guide in order to receive a certificate that you completed this two-weekend Wood Badge course. This must be done by noon on May 24.
    6. Upon returning home after this course, a ticket counselor will be assigned to you. The ticket counselor gives final approval to your ticket. The ticket counselor will be familiar with the material currently presented in Wood Badge courses. You will meet with your counselor to finalize your ticket and establish a review plan. You are responsible for tracking down your ticket counselor -- not vice versa.
    In Monmouth Council, ticket counselors will be assigned before the end of the second weekend and be made known to you.
    For the four other councils represented here, your Training Committee Chairs already have your names and will be assigning your ticket counselors.
  • Working Your Ticket...
    7. You “work your ticket.” The five goals must be completed within 18 months of the end of this course -- November 23, 2005
    8. When you and your counselor agree that you have fulfilled all the items on your ticket, you will receive your Wood Badge certificate, beads, neckerchief, and woggle.
    What happens if your Scouting job changes or you find that one or more of your goals just can’t be “worked?”
  • Summary
    Effective leaders create a compelling vision and translate it into reality.
    Values motivate us - what are yours?
    Your mission is based on the job you do in Scouting.
    The plan to bring it to life … that’s your vision.
    Your Wood Badge Ticket helps turn your vision into reality.
  • As a result of this session, you will:
    Understand what is meant by values, mission, and vision
    Review the values, mission, and vision of Scouting
    Consider values, mission, and vision, in the context of leadership
    Learn about the Wood Badge Ticket
    Begin writing your own Wood Badge Ticket based upon your personal values, vision and mission

Transcript

  • 1. VALUES, Mission, and Vision Denis Longo Scoutmaster, NE-II-159
  • 2. NE-II-159 2 Learning Objectives As a result of this session, you will:  Understand what is meant by values, mission, and vision  Review the values, mission, and vision of Scouting  Consider values, mission, and vision, in the context of leadership  Learn about the Wood Badge Ticket  Begin writing your own Wood Badge Ticket based upon your personal values, mission, and vision
  • 3. NE-II-159 3 A Story of Values, Mission, and Vision
  • 4. NE-II-159 4 Values What is your definition of Values?
  • 5. NE-II-159 5 Values Values … are core beliefs or desires that guide or motivate our attitudes and actions
  • 6. NE-II-159 6 Values Where do we get our Values?
  • 7. NE-II-159 7 Values Values can take a variety of forms. For example:  Principles or standards • “Service Above Self” (Rotary Club International) • “Be Prepared” • “Do A Good Turn Daily” ...  Personal Qualities • Honesty • Communication • Being Organized
  • 8. NE-II-159 8 Values  Character Traits • Loyalty, enthusiasm, openness to others  Codes of Ethics • Hippocratic Oath • Ten Commandments • BSA’s Outdoor Code ...  Goals • Living a healthy life • Caring for others
  • 9. NE-II-159 9 Values The Scout Oath and The Scout Law are statements of Scouting’s Values
  • 10. NE-II-159 10 Values “Acting in accord with our beliefs and values is one of the greatest challenges each of us faces every day. It’s true for individuals in all aspects of life … and equally true for organizations of every kind and size.” Eric Harvey and Alexander Lucia
  • 11. NE-II-159 11 Mission What is a Mission?
  • 12. NE-II-159 12 Mission A mission is a brief statement that reflects the core values of an organization. A mission communicates an organization’s long-term objectives – why the organization exists.
  • 13. NE-II-159 13 Mission Statement A Mission Statement …  Serves as a communication tool for an organization  Aligns people with a purpose; it fosters commitment and unity  Defines directions for change and growth  Acts as an evaluation tool to help measure activities and programs
  • 14. NE-II-159 14 Sample Mission Statements  “To establish Starbucks as the premier purveyor of the finest coffee in the world while maintaining our uncompromising principles as we grow” – Starbucks Coffee  “To solve unsolved problems innovatively” – 3M  “To offer all the fine customers in our territories all of their household needs in a manner in which they continue to think of us fondly” – Wal-Mart
  • 15. NE-II-159 15 Mission Statement Supported by lists of Corporate Values “To preserve and improve human life:  “Corporate social responsibility  “Unequivocal excellence in all aspects of the company  “Science-based innovation  “Honesty and integrity  “Profit, but profit from work that benefits humanity” – Merck
  • 16. NE-II-159 16 Mission Statement Supported by lists of Corporate Values “To make people happy:  “No cynicism  “Nurturing and promulgation of ‘wholesome American values’  “Creativity, dreams, and imagination  “Fanatical attention to consistency and detail  “Preservation and control of the Disney ‘magic’” – Walt Disney
  • 17. NE-II-159 17 Mission Statement “The mission of the Boy Scouts of America is to prepare young people to make ethical and moral choices over their lifetimes by instilling in them the values of the Scout Oath and Law.” – Mission Statement of the Boy Scouts of America
  • 18. NE-II-159 18 Vision What is a Vision?
  • 19. NE-II-159 19 Vision A vision is a picture of future success. A vision forms when we think far enough ahead to realize there will be important challenges that we can prepare for now.
  • 20. NE-II-159 20 Vision “Nothing happens unless first a dream.” – Carl Sandburg
  • 21. NE-II-159 21 Vision Consider these Visions:
  • 22. NE-II-159 22 Vision John F. Kennedy: September 12, 1962 “We choose to go to the moon.”
  • 23. NE-II-159 23 Vision Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. August 28, 1963 “I have a dream.”
  • 24. NE-II-159 24 Vision Margaret Thatcher Former Prime Minister of England “It is my unique responsibility as the leader to shine a spotlight on the future….”
  • 25. NE-II-159 25 Vision Lord Baden-Powell … a world brotherhood of Scouts living in peace.
  • 26. NE-II-159 26 Vision Criteria for a Meaningful Vision  A vision engages the heart and the spirit.  ... leads toward a worthwhile goal.  ... gives meaning to an effort.  ... is simple.  ... is attainable.  ... can change over time.
  • 27. NE-II-159 27 Vision Statement – Boy Scouts of America The Boy Scouts of America is the nation’s foremost youth program of character development and values-based leadership training. In the future, Scouting will continue to:  Offer young people responsible fun and adventure;  Instill in young people lifetime values and develop in them ethical character as expressed in the Scout Oath and Law.  Train young people in citizenship, service, and leadership;  Serve America’s communities and families with its quality, values-based program.
  • 28. NE-II-159 28 Reviewing: Values, Mission, and Vision Values – Core beliefs or desires that guide or motivate our attitudes and our actions. Mission – Encapsulates the values and articulates the overall, long-term objective. Vision – A picture of success and the related plan of action.
  • 29. NE-II-159 29 Punch Line: Values, Vision and Mission  “A vision without a mission is just a dream …  “A mission without a vision just passes the time …  “A vision with action can change the world.” – Joel Barker
  • 30. NE-II-159 40 Summary Effective leaders create a compelling vision and translate it into reality.  Values motivate us – what are your values?  Your job in Scouting – what is your mission?  The plan to bring it to life – what is your vision? Your Wood Badge Ticket is your key to turning your Vision into Reality
  • 31. NE-II-159 41 Learning Objectives As a result of this session, you will:  Understand what is meant by values, mission, and vision  Review the values, mission, and vision of Scouting  Consider values, mission, and vision, in the context of leadership  Learn about the Wood Badge Ticket  Begin writing your own Wood Badge Ticket based upon your personal values, mission, and vision
  • 32. Thank You!