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Promising practices blastoff_-8-21-12_final
 

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Promising practices blastoff_-8-21-12_final Promising practices blastoff_-8-21-12_final Presentation Transcript

  • Lamar University College of Education Educational Leadership Beaumont, TXPromising Practicesfor Engaging LearnersDr. L. Kay AbernathyDr. Cynthia D. CummingsDr. Sheryl R. AbshireDr. Diane Mason
  • How Do We Engage PK-20 Learners? Who are they?Uniquenessfor Faculty: First generation of digital learners. Use digital media, games, and communication tools. Diverse backgrounds, experiences, and learning needs.
  • Digital Savvy Students:Tapscott (1998, 2008) = Prensky (2001a, Net Generation & 2001b, 2009) = Generation Next or Digital Natives Generation Z Helsper (2008 & Enyon (2009) = Oblinger & Oblinger Second Generation (2005) = Using Online Gaming, Millenials Social Media, and Web 2.0 Tools
  • Guiding Question:What do I need to keepin mind when planningfor engaging tools andresources to enhance thelearning environment forDigital Natives andSecond GenerationDigital Natives?
  • Interactive LearningEnvironmentCollaborationProject-based learningPartneringAuthentic AssessmentAudienceDigital Medium
  • Teaching Considerations for the Digital Student: Daniel Pink’s Drive tells us that autonomy, mastery, and purpose are most important for motivation. Develop Partnerships for learning. Wired for higher level thinking, exploration, collaboration, and interaction. Use of project-based, problem-based, case-based studies with inquiry. Desire for fast-paced, interactive learning activities including constructivism co-constructing principles and learning by doing.  Flipped classrooms
  • Collaboration
  • Example: Collaborative Team Google DocumentDiscussion focused on week’s assignment to ensure sharing of Google Docs with each other. Upcoming Web 2.0 tools assignment was also discussed.Document created by the Fantastic Five (graduate students) as part of Week 3 assignments for EDLD 5362. Team Google Document
  • Flipped ClassroomsDesire for fast-paced,interactive learning activitiesincluding constructivism co-constructing principles andlearning by doing.http://www.flippedlearning.org/
  • Partnering
  • Students Wired for What They LoveWired for higher level thinking, exploration, collaboration, and interaction. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D1R- jKKp3NAPersonal Learning Network http://edupln.comAllow your students to find what they love. Love what they do. They are the new; we are the old! Live their inner voice. Follow their hearts. Stay hungry. Stay foolish. (Steve Jobs 2005)
  • Project-Based Learning
  • Use of Project and Problem-Based, Case BasedStudies, and Inquiry.An Introduction to Project-Based Learninghttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dFySmS9_y_0Project-Based Learning from Start to Finishhttp://www.edutopia.org/stw-project-based-learning-best-practices-new-tech-videoProject-Based Learning for the 21st Centruywww.bie.org
  • AuthenticAssessment
  • Authentic Assessment Demonstrate understanding by performing a more complex task Analyze, synthesize and apply learning and students create new meaning in the process as well. Direct evidence of application and construction of knowledge Traditional Authentic Selecting a Response Performing a Task Contrived Real-life Recall/Recognition Construction/Application Teacher-structured Student-structured Indirect Evidence Direct Evidence
  • Authentic Assessment Authentic Assessment Toolbox http://jfmueller.faculty.noctrl.edu/toolbox/index.htm Eportfolio- https://sites.google.com/site/oh2learn/ Poll Everywhere- www.polleverywhere.com Twitter Student Response Systems Analysis/Critiques Peer Review Performances
  • Audience
  • AudienceAuthenticAppropriateEncourages AccountabilityBeyond the ClassroomExamples:  http://kimberlydarden.blogspot.com/  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0- bezhoK2Ak&feature=youtu.be  https://sites.google.com/site/cyborgstti/home  https://sites.google.com/site/teknowledgeexchange/home
  • Digital Medium
  • Digital Medium Web 2.0 Resources Online learning management systems Podcast Twitter Facebook iTunes U Youtube Customized learning using gaming Web conferencing Cell phones iPads Bring your own devices Open Education Resources (OER)
  • How to become a better teacher in the digital age? Tapscott’s 7 StrategiesDon’t throw technology into the classroom and hope for good things. Focus on the change in pedagogy, not technology Learning 2.0 is about dramatically changing the relationship between a teacher and students in the learning process. Use technology for a student-focused, customized, collaborative learning environment.
  • Tapscott’s 7 Strategies (Cont.)Cut back on lecturing. You don’t have all the answers. Broadcast learning doesn’t work for this generation. Start asking students questions and listen to their answers. Listen to the questions students ask, too. Let them discover the answer. Let them co-create a learning experience with you.
  • Tapscott’s 7 Strategies (Cont.)Empower students to collaborate. Encourage them to work with each other and show them how to access the world of subject-matter experts available on the Web.
  • Tapscott’s 7 Strategies (Cont.)Focus on lifelong learning, not teaching to the test. It’s not what they know when they graduate that counts; it’s their capacity and love for lifelong learning that’s important. Focus on teaching them how to learn – not what to know.
  • Tapscott’s 7 Strategies (Cont.) Design educational programs according to the eight norms. -should be choice -customization -transparency -integrity -collaboration -fun -speed -innovation in their learning experiences -leverage strengths of Net Gen culture and behaviors in project-based learning
  • Tapscott’s 7 Strategies (Cont.) Use technology to get to know each student and build self-paced, customized learning programs for them. Reinvent yourself as a teacher, professor, or educator
  • Blast Off for the Connected EducatorPromising Practices for Engaging LearnersWeb 2.0 Tools to Support Engaged LearningProject-Based Learning (PBL) in Higher Educationhttp://connectededucator.org
  • Contact Information Presentation URL http://tinyurl.com/8jgovgnDr. L. Kay Abernathy Dr. Cynthia Cummingslkabernathy@lamar.edu cdcummings@lamar.eduDr. Sheryl Abshire Dr. Diane Masonsheryl.abshire@lamar.edu diane.mason@lamar.edu