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Introduction ENG 276
Introduction ENG 276
Introduction ENG 276
Introduction ENG 276
Introduction ENG 276
Introduction ENG 276
Introduction ENG 276
Introduction ENG 276
Introduction ENG 276
Introduction ENG 276
Introduction ENG 276
Introduction ENG 276
Introduction ENG 276
Introduction ENG 276
Introduction ENG 276
Introduction ENG 276
Introduction ENG 276
Introduction ENG 276
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Introduction ENG 276

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An overview of the themes and authors read in English 276.

An overview of the themes and authors read in English 276.

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    • 1. Identity of a Culture: Rooted in Place An Introduction to Southern Literature
    • 2. Covered in this presentation <ul><li>Definitions of Southern Literature </li></ul><ul><li>Origins/roots </li></ul><ul><li>Themes </li></ul><ul><li>Time periods </li></ul><ul><li>Voices </li></ul>
    • 3. What defines the “American South”? <ul><li>Location, location, location </li></ul><ul><li>Cultural concerns </li></ul>
    • 4. Roots of Southern Literature <ul><li>The oral tradition </li></ul><ul><li>Rich cultural mix </li></ul>
    • 5. Primary interests/ themes/ motifs <ul><li>Storytelling </li></ul><ul><li>Family – community </li></ul><ul><li>Slavery / race relations after the war </li></ul><ul><li>Gender roles </li></ul><ul><li>Agrarianism </li></ul><ul><li>Preoccupation with the past </li></ul>
    • 6. Hollywood’s version of the Old South (movie poster, 1939)
    • 7. <ul><li>“ There was a land of Cavaliers and Cotton Fields called the Old South . . . </li></ul><ul><li>Here in this pretty world Gallantry took its last bow . . . </li></ul><ul><li>Here was the last ever to be seen of Knights and their Ladies Fair, of Master and of Slave . . . </li></ul><ul><li>Look for it only in books, for it is no more than a dream remembered . . . </li></ul><ul><li>A Civilization . . .gone with the wind . . .” </li></ul><ul><li>(The opening exposition of the film Gone With the Wind ) </li></ul>
    • 8. I. Beginnings to 1880 <ul><li>Thomas Jefferson </li></ul><ul><li>Mary Boykin Chesnut </li></ul><ul><li>Harriet Ann Jacobs </li></ul><ul><li>Frederick Douglass </li></ul>(portrait by Samuel Osgood)
    • 9. II. The New South 1880 - 1940 <ul><li>Samuel Clemens (Mark Twain) </li></ul><ul><li>Joel C. Harris </li></ul><ul><li>Kate Chopin </li></ul><ul><li>Zora Neale Hurston </li></ul><ul><li>William Faulkner </li></ul>(drawing by E. W. Kemble)
    • 10. Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960) (photo from the Library of Congress) “ There is no great sorrow dammed up in my soul, nor lurking behind my eyes . . . I do not belong to the sobbing school of Negrohood.” from “How It Feels to Be Colored Me”
    • 11. William Faulkner (1897 – 1962) (photo from Southern Literary Trail ) “ The past is never dead. It’s not even past.” from Requiem for a Nun
    • 12. III. Contemporary South 1940 - present <ul><li>Eudora Welty </li></ul><ul><li>Tennessee Williams </li></ul><ul><li>Flannery O’Connor </li></ul><ul><li>Kay Gibbons </li></ul><ul><li>Minton Sparks </li></ul>
    • 13. Tennessee Williams (1911 – 1983) (photo by Orland Fernandez) “ When we first met, me and you, you thought I was common. How right you was, baby. I was common as dirt . . . And wasn’t we happy together? Wasn’t it all okay? Till she showed here. Hoity-toity, describing me as an ape.” Stanley from A Streetcar Named Desire (Andrews, 676)
    • 14. Flannery O’Connor (1925 – 1964) <ul><li>“ The truth does not change according to our ability to stomach it.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ I use the grotesque the way I do because people are deaf and dumb and need help to see and hear.” </li></ul><ul><li>from Good Reads </li></ul>(photo from NNDB: Tracking the World )
    • 15. Alice Walker b. 1944 (photo by Noah Berger) “ You better not never tell nobody but God. It’d kill your mammy.” from The Color Purple
    • 16. <ul><li>(photo by Vaschelle Andre) </li></ul>
    • 17. Works Cited Andre, Vaschelle. “Alice Walker with her Power Plant, Collard Greens.” 2009. Alice Walker’s Garden . 2009. 15 July 2009 <http://www.alicewalkersgarden.com/>. Andrews, William L., ed. The Literature of the American South: A Norton Anthology . New York: Norton & Company, 1998. Berger, Noah. “Alice Walker.” 2008. Alice Walker’s Garden . 2009. 15 July 2009 <http://www.alicewalkersgarden.com/>. Faulkner, William. Absalom! Absalom! 1936 . New York: Vintage International, 1990. ---. Requiem for a Nun. New York: Random, 1950. Fernandez, Orland. “Tennessee Williams.” 1965. Library of Congress. Wikimedia Commons. 2009. 15 July 2009 <http://commons.wilimedia.org/wiki/File:Tennessee_Williams_NYWTS.jpg>. Ferris, William. R. “Eudora Welty” Early Photo. Southern Folklife Digital Archive. Hosted by Ibiblio: the Public’s Library and Digital Archive. Chapel Hill, North Carolina, U.S.A. last revised May 14, 2008. 15 July 2009 <http://www.ibiblio.org/ferris/people/welty/>. “ Flannery O’Connor.” NNDB: Tracking the World. 2009 Soylent Communications. 15 July 2009 <http://www.nndb.com/people/414/000044282/>.
    • 18. Works Cited continued Gone With the Wind . Dir. Victor Fleming. Selznick International Pictures., 1939. “ Gone With the Wind (trailer).” Editing Exercise by Beatrice Corti. YouTube. 2009. 15 July 2009 <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8mM8iNarcRc>. “ Gone With the Wind.” Movie Poster. 1939. The Films. 1997 – 2009. 16 July 2009 <http://tf.org/filmcard/1014>. Kemble, E.W. “Br’er Rabbit and the Tar-Baby” Drawing from The Tar-Baby by Joel Chandler Harris, 1904. Wikimedia Commons. 2009. 16 July 2009 <http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/ File:Br%27er_Rabbit_and_Tar-Baby.jpg>. O’Connor, Flannery. Quotes. Good Reads . 2009 16 July 2009 <http://www.goodreads.com/>. Osgood, Samuel. “Mary Boykin Chestnut.” Portrait. 1850s. On loan to National Portrait Gallery by Serena VanRensselaer. Sweet Briar College. 15 July 2009 <http://www2.sbc.edu/president/mbc.html?books>. Walker, Alice. The Color Purple . Orlando: Harcourt, 1982. Welty, Eudora. One Writer’s Beginnings . 1983. MA, Harvard Press, 2000. “ William Faulkner.” Photo. Southern Literary Trail . 2009. 15 July 2009 <http://www.southernliterarytrail.org/oxford.html>. “ Zora Neale Hurston.” Photo. Library of Congress. The American Novel. 2007. Educational Broadcasting Corporation. 15 July 2009 <http://www.pbs.org/wnet/americannovel/timeline/hurston.html>.

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