Introduction ENG 276

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An overview of the themes and authors read in English 276.

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  • Introduction ENG 276

    1. 1. Identity of a Culture: Rooted in Place An Introduction to Southern Literature
    2. 2. Covered in this presentation <ul><li>Definitions of Southern Literature </li></ul><ul><li>Origins/roots </li></ul><ul><li>Themes </li></ul><ul><li>Time periods </li></ul><ul><li>Voices </li></ul>
    3. 3. What defines the “American South”? <ul><li>Location, location, location </li></ul><ul><li>Cultural concerns </li></ul>
    4. 4. Roots of Southern Literature <ul><li>The oral tradition </li></ul><ul><li>Rich cultural mix </li></ul>
    5. 5. Primary interests/ themes/ motifs <ul><li>Storytelling </li></ul><ul><li>Family – community </li></ul><ul><li>Slavery / race relations after the war </li></ul><ul><li>Gender roles </li></ul><ul><li>Agrarianism </li></ul><ul><li>Preoccupation with the past </li></ul>
    6. 6. Hollywood’s version of the Old South (movie poster, 1939)
    7. 7. <ul><li>“ There was a land of Cavaliers and Cotton Fields called the Old South . . . </li></ul><ul><li>Here in this pretty world Gallantry took its last bow . . . </li></ul><ul><li>Here was the last ever to be seen of Knights and their Ladies Fair, of Master and of Slave . . . </li></ul><ul><li>Look for it only in books, for it is no more than a dream remembered . . . </li></ul><ul><li>A Civilization . . .gone with the wind . . .” </li></ul><ul><li>(The opening exposition of the film Gone With the Wind ) </li></ul>
    8. 8. I. Beginnings to 1880 <ul><li>Thomas Jefferson </li></ul><ul><li>Mary Boykin Chesnut </li></ul><ul><li>Harriet Ann Jacobs </li></ul><ul><li>Frederick Douglass </li></ul>(portrait by Samuel Osgood)
    9. 9. II. The New South 1880 - 1940 <ul><li>Samuel Clemens (Mark Twain) </li></ul><ul><li>Joel C. Harris </li></ul><ul><li>Kate Chopin </li></ul><ul><li>Zora Neale Hurston </li></ul><ul><li>William Faulkner </li></ul>(drawing by E. W. Kemble)
    10. 10. Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960) (photo from the Library of Congress) “ There is no great sorrow dammed up in my soul, nor lurking behind my eyes . . . I do not belong to the sobbing school of Negrohood.” from “How It Feels to Be Colored Me”
    11. 11. William Faulkner (1897 – 1962) (photo from Southern Literary Trail ) “ The past is never dead. It’s not even past.” from Requiem for a Nun
    12. 12. III. Contemporary South 1940 - present <ul><li>Eudora Welty </li></ul><ul><li>Tennessee Williams </li></ul><ul><li>Flannery O’Connor </li></ul><ul><li>Kay Gibbons </li></ul><ul><li>Minton Sparks </li></ul>
    13. 13. Tennessee Williams (1911 – 1983) (photo by Orland Fernandez) “ When we first met, me and you, you thought I was common. How right you was, baby. I was common as dirt . . . And wasn’t we happy together? Wasn’t it all okay? Till she showed here. Hoity-toity, describing me as an ape.” Stanley from A Streetcar Named Desire (Andrews, 676)
    14. 14. Flannery O’Connor (1925 – 1964) <ul><li>“ The truth does not change according to our ability to stomach it.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ I use the grotesque the way I do because people are deaf and dumb and need help to see and hear.” </li></ul><ul><li>from Good Reads </li></ul>(photo from NNDB: Tracking the World )
    15. 15. Alice Walker b. 1944 (photo by Noah Berger) “ You better not never tell nobody but God. It’d kill your mammy.” from The Color Purple
    16. 16. <ul><li>(photo by Vaschelle Andre) </li></ul>
    17. 17. Works Cited Andre, Vaschelle. “Alice Walker with her Power Plant, Collard Greens.” 2009. Alice Walker’s Garden . 2009. 15 July 2009 <http://www.alicewalkersgarden.com/>. Andrews, William L., ed. The Literature of the American South: A Norton Anthology . New York: Norton & Company, 1998. Berger, Noah. “Alice Walker.” 2008. Alice Walker’s Garden . 2009. 15 July 2009 <http://www.alicewalkersgarden.com/>. Faulkner, William. Absalom! Absalom! 1936 . New York: Vintage International, 1990. ---. Requiem for a Nun. New York: Random, 1950. Fernandez, Orland. “Tennessee Williams.” 1965. Library of Congress. Wikimedia Commons. 2009. 15 July 2009 <http://commons.wilimedia.org/wiki/File:Tennessee_Williams_NYWTS.jpg>. Ferris, William. R. “Eudora Welty” Early Photo. Southern Folklife Digital Archive. Hosted by Ibiblio: the Public’s Library and Digital Archive. Chapel Hill, North Carolina, U.S.A. last revised May 14, 2008. 15 July 2009 <http://www.ibiblio.org/ferris/people/welty/>. “ Flannery O’Connor.” NNDB: Tracking the World. 2009 Soylent Communications. 15 July 2009 <http://www.nndb.com/people/414/000044282/>.
    18. 18. Works Cited continued Gone With the Wind . Dir. Victor Fleming. Selznick International Pictures., 1939. “ Gone With the Wind (trailer).” Editing Exercise by Beatrice Corti. YouTube. 2009. 15 July 2009 <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8mM8iNarcRc>. “ Gone With the Wind.” Movie Poster. 1939. The Films. 1997 – 2009. 16 July 2009 <http://tf.org/filmcard/1014>. Kemble, E.W. “Br’er Rabbit and the Tar-Baby” Drawing from The Tar-Baby by Joel Chandler Harris, 1904. Wikimedia Commons. 2009. 16 July 2009 <http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/ File:Br%27er_Rabbit_and_Tar-Baby.jpg>. O’Connor, Flannery. Quotes. Good Reads . 2009 16 July 2009 <http://www.goodreads.com/>. Osgood, Samuel. “Mary Boykin Chestnut.” Portrait. 1850s. On loan to National Portrait Gallery by Serena VanRensselaer. Sweet Briar College. 15 July 2009 <http://www2.sbc.edu/president/mbc.html?books>. Walker, Alice. The Color Purple . Orlando: Harcourt, 1982. Welty, Eudora. One Writer’s Beginnings . 1983. MA, Harvard Press, 2000. “ William Faulkner.” Photo. Southern Literary Trail . 2009. 15 July 2009 <http://www.southernliterarytrail.org/oxford.html>. “ Zora Neale Hurston.” Photo. Library of Congress. The American Novel. 2007. Educational Broadcasting Corporation. 15 July 2009 <http://www.pbs.org/wnet/americannovel/timeline/hurston.html>.

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