The Liberation The Nuremberg Trials By Jack Myer
Liberation of camps <ul><li>First to liberate the camp prisoners were the Soviets. </li></ul><ul><li>On July 23,1944, they...
Liberation of camps cont. <ul><li>American, British, Canadian, and French soldiers also freed camps. </li></ul><ul><li>Whi...
Nuremberg Trials <ul><li>After the war, trials were held for those who were responsible for the Holocaust. </li></ul><ul><...
Charges <ul><li>There were four main charges against the officials and the Nazi Party </li></ul><ul><li>They charged with,...
Sentences <ul><li>12 prominent Nazis were convicted and sentenced to death, due to their direct involvement in the Holocau...
Later Trials <ul><li>Trials against the Nazis continued to take place both in Germany and in other countries. </li></ul><u...
Bibliography <ul><li>http://www.historyplace.com/worldwar2/timeline/nurem.htm </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.law.umkc.edu/fa...
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The Liberation

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The Liberation

  1. 1. The Liberation The Nuremberg Trials By Jack Myer
  2. 2. Liberation of camps <ul><li>First to liberate the camp prisoners were the Soviets. </li></ul><ul><li>On July 23,1944, they arrived at the Majdanek camp in Poland and overran several other camps. </li></ul><ul><li>On January 27, 1945, they arrived at the Auschwitz camp and found hundreds of sick and exhausted people. </li></ul><ul><li>The Germans had been forced to leave, leaving the prisoners to fend for themselves. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Liberation of camps cont. <ul><li>American, British, Canadian, and French soldiers also freed camps. </li></ul><ul><li>While Americans freed the Buchenwald and Dachau camps, the British liberated the Bergen-Belsen camp. </li></ul><ul><li>They were shocked by all the bodies that were found lying around and the condition of those still living. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Nuremberg Trials <ul><li>After the war, trials were held for those who were responsible for the Holocaust. </li></ul><ul><li>Taking place in Nuremberg, Germany, from 1945-46, judges from the Allied Powers: USA, USSR, UK, and France, presided over the hearing of 22 Nazi criminals. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Charges <ul><li>There were four main charges against the officials and the Nazi Party </li></ul><ul><li>They charged with, “conspiracy to wage aggressive war,” “waging an aggressive war” (or “crime against peace,”) “war crimes,” and “crimes against humanity.” </li></ul>
  6. 6. Sentences <ul><li>12 prominent Nazis were convicted and sentenced to death, due to their direct involvement in the Holocaust. </li></ul><ul><li>Some admitted to the crimes they were accused of, saying they were just following orders. </li></ul><ul><li>Other key people involved in the Holocaust, including high-level government officials and business executives that used prisoners for forced labor, were given short prison sentences or no sentence at all. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Later Trials <ul><li>Trials against the Nazis continued to take place both in Germany and in other countries. </li></ul><ul><li>In 1961, Simon Wiesenthal, a Nazi hunter found Adolf Eichmann, who helped carry out the deportation of millions of Jews. Eichmann was found in Argentina and brought to trial in Israel. </li></ul><ul><li>Many survivors were witnesses for the trial, which was followed all over the world. Eichmann was found guilty and executed in 1962. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Bibliography <ul><li>http://www.historyplace.com/worldwar2/timeline/nurem.htm </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.law.umkc.edu/faculty/projects/ftrials/nuremberg/nurembergACCOUNT.html </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.ushmm.org/outreach/wcrime.htm </li></ul>

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