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Parts of Speech Slideshow
 

Parts of Speech Slideshow

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    Parts of Speech Slideshow Parts of Speech Slideshow Presentation Transcript

    • The 8 PARTS OF SPEECH An Overview
    • Parts of Speech
      • Determining parts of speech is nothing more than determining the function/job a particular word has in a sentence. They all play a role in the sentence, and one word might be a noun one time and a verb the next.
      • Let’s take the word run for example.
        • Let’s go on a RUN after school. (NOUN)
        • I will RUN to the cafeteria to be first in line (VERB)
    • NOUNS person, place, thing, idea
      • Common : chair, pencil, school
      • Proper : Woodward Academy
      • Concrete : desk, Aunt Lulu
      • Abstract : freedom, love
      • Compound : firefighter
      • Collective : class, herd
    • PRONOUNS
      • Pronouns, for the most part, take the place of nouns.
      • There are actually several different kinds of pronouns, and they are used much more than most people realize.
    • PERSONAL PRONOUNS - the basics
      • FIRST PERSON : I, me, my, mine, we, our, ours, us
      • SECOND PERSON : you, your, yours
      • THIRD PERSON : he, she, it, its, his, him, her, hers, they, their, theirs, them
    • DEMONSTRATIVE
      • THIS, THAT, THESE, and THOSE
      • ONLY used in place of nouns ( be aware of Demonstrative Adjectives - don’t use them before a noun ).
        • THIS is my book.
        • THAT is yours.
        • THESE are my pickles.
        • THOSE are his shoes.
    • INTERROGATIVE
      • WHAT, WHICH, WHO, WHOM, AND WHOSE
      • And like all interrogatives, they start questions:
        • WHAT are you doing?
        • WHO do you think you are?
    • RELATIVE
      • WHO, WHOM, WHOSE, WHICH, THAT
      • These look like interrogative pronouns, but they do NOT ask questions.
      • They begin clauses that add more info to a sentence:
        • My students, WHO are the best and brightest, love relative pronouns.
        • The vegetables THAT are the healthiest are the green ones.
    • INDEFINITE
      • An indefinite pronoun refers to something that is not definite or specific or exact.
      • The indefinite pronouns include but are not limited to the following:
        • all, another, any, each, everybody, everyone, everything, few, many, nobody, none, one, several, some, somebody, either, neither
    • ADJECTIVES
      • Adjectives modify nouns & pronouns
      • They tell WHICH ONE, WHAT KIND, and HOW MANY
        • WHICH ONE : this book or that one
        • WHAT KIND : the red ball, the tall kid
        • HOW MANY : two kids, several moments
    • DEMONSTRATIVE ADJECTIVES: this, that, these, and those
      • They are also pronouns - so be careful how you use them.
      • To use them as an adjective, place them directly before a noun:
        • THIS book is so good.
        • THOSE pencils should be put away.
    • VERBS
      • Express ACTION or a STATE OF BEING (linking).
        • ACTION: cry, leap, laugh, run
        • STATE OF BEING: is, seems, looks, appears
    • HELPING VERBS
      • Many people are confused about the difference between LINKING and HELPING verbs - and for good reason: many of the words are the same (is, are, can, could…).
      • HELPING verbs help both ACTION & LINKING verbs, while LINKING stand alone.
        • HELPING : I WILL walk to my class.
        • LINKING : I AM a teacher.
    • ADVERBS
      • Adverbs modify verbs, adverbs, and adjectives.
      • They answer the questions how, why, when, where, to what extent, and under what condition.
      • They often end in -LY (badly, gracefully), but they do not have to.
      • Words like soon , there , & very are common adverbs that do not end in -ly.
    • PREPOSITIONS
      • Prepositions express relationships between other words.
      • They are ALWAYS in a phrase (hint: if you see one alone, it’s an adverb).
      • In the pool, near the school, over the roof, around the fence
      • COMPOUND PREPS include because of, in addition to, instead of
    • CONJUNCTIONS
      • Conjunction, junction, what’s your function?
      • TO CONNECT words, phrases, & clauses
      • There are two main kinds: coordinating & correlative
    • COORDINATING & CORRELATIVE
      • COORDINATING are the FANBOYS:
        • or, and, nor, but, or yet, so
      • CORRELATIVE work with a partner
        • either… or neither… nor
        • not only… but also
    • INTERJECTIONS
      • Words used to add feeling or emphasis to (usually) the beginning of a sentence. They can be followed by a comma or a conjunction.
        • Wow!
        • Hey!
        • Awww,