Networking   Navigating Grad School and Beyond:  Skills for Academic Success Gregory Ward Northwestern University Lauren H...
Some Examples of How  Not  to Network
How  Not  to Network, #1
How  Not  to Network, #2
How  Not  to Network, #3
So, How  Do  You Network and  Why  Do It?
Why Network? <ul><li>If you want to stay in linguistics/academia: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Everyone is a future colleague, an...
Some Real Examples <ul><li>Your new job has you teaching a course that’s not your specialization. What books do you use? W...
Some Real Examples <ul><li>You need people to review abstracts for a mini-conference you’re running. </li></ul><ul><li>You...
Some Real Examples <ul><li>You’re using a new piece of technology, stats test, or other method, and you want to ask people...
How to Network <ul><li>Get known   </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Get seen </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Get heard </li></ul></ul><ul>...
How to Network <ul><li>Get seen  (“face time”)   </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Attend </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Conferences <...
How to Network <ul><li>Get heard </li></ul><ul><ul><li>At conferences </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Give your own present...
How to Network <ul><li>Get heard, cont. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>At talks at your institution   </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><l...
How to Network <ul><li>Now that you have their attention… </li></ul><ul><li>What do you say? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Briefly...
How to Network <ul><li>Get read </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Publications </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Journal articles (of cou...
Networking 2.0 <ul><li>Blogging </li></ul><ul><li>Academia.edu </li></ul><ul><li>Facebook </li></ul><ul><li>Twitter </li><...
Twitter <ul><li>Transnational network of linguists and other language specialists </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Interaction betwee...
Twitter Examples <ul><li>Exchanging information about conferences, workshops, jobs, journals, books… </li></ul><ul><li>Col...
<ul><li>Spring 2009 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>I’m a student in California. I’ve been on Twitter awhile, following linguists an...
More Tips <ul><li>At conferences, hang out with students who  don’t  go to your school (you see those guys all the time, r...
Afterwards <ul><li>Follow through: email the people you’ll say you’re going to email. </li></ul><ul><li>Reintroduce yourse...
Always Provide Your Contact Info! <ul><ul><li>Gregory Ward </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>email :  [email_address] </li></ul><...
Any Questions?
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Networking: Navigating Grad School and Beyond: Skills for Academic Success

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Slides on the importance of networking for academically-minded PhD students. Written and compiled by Gregory Ward and Lauren Hall-Lew, presented at the Linguistics Society of America meeting, January 2011, Pittsburgh, PA, in a panel run by COSIAC: Committee on Student Issues and Concerns.

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  • When you’re on different levels or floors, I.e. not in contact with other people in the field.
  • When one person cannot interest the other in conversation, no matter how nice the setting…
  • When you have to pin the other person down to get their attention…
  • Lauren is going to start with “Why Network?”…
  • So people can associate a name with a face. Be active in the discipline. Be SEEN.
  • “Your work on X has really guided my thinking… I’d appreciate any comments you may have…” Tell Sandy Thompson story.
  • Networking: Navigating Grad School and Beyond: Skills for Academic Success

    1. 1. Networking Navigating Grad School and Beyond: Skills for Academic Success Gregory Ward Northwestern University Lauren Hall-Lew University of Edinburgh LSA Annual Meeting Pittsburgh, PA 8 January 2011
    2. 2. Some Examples of How Not to Network
    3. 3. How Not to Network, #1
    4. 4. How Not to Network, #2
    5. 5. How Not to Network, #3
    6. 6. So, How Do You Network and Why Do It?
    7. 7. Why Network? <ul><li>If you want to stay in linguistics/academia: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Everyone is a future colleague, and many people are potential future collaborators: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>In research </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>In teaching / advising / examining </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>In event planning </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>If you don’t: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>You never know what contacts might lead to a job! </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>You never know when you’re gonna need a linguist. </li></ul></ul>
    8. 8. Some Real Examples <ul><li>Your new job has you teaching a course that’s not your specialization. What books do you use? What problem sets do you assign? </li></ul><ul><li>Your new set of students are interested in researching things outside your specialization. Whose work should they be reading? </li></ul><ul><li>Your new department is hosting a workshop and wants to invite people who specialize in topics that no one in the department works on. Who? </li></ul>
    9. 9. Some Real Examples <ul><li>You need people to review abstracts for a mini-conference you’re running. </li></ul><ul><li>You need people (and their students, family, & friends) to take an online experiment or survey you’re running. </li></ul><ul><li>You need people to serve as external examiners for your students’ work. </li></ul><ul><li>You want people to contribute to a thematic volume you’re editing. </li></ul>
    10. 10. Some Real Examples <ul><li>You’re using a new piece of technology, stats test, or other method, and you want to ask people who have experience with it. </li></ul><ul><li>You like traveling and want your trips to be paid for! </li></ul><ul><li>You want to find out who else is going to a conference you’re going to, to ride/room share… and to continue networking! </li></ul>
    11. 11. How to Network <ul><li>Get known </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Get seen </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Get heard </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Get read </li></ul></ul>
    12. 12. How to Network <ul><li>Get seen (“face time”) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Attend </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Conferences </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Institutes </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Talks at your institution </li></ul></ul></ul>
    13. 13. How to Network <ul><li>Get heard </li></ul><ul><ul><li>At conferences </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Give your own presentations. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Ask questions at others’. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Talk to/email people after their talks. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Introduce yourself (or ask your advisor (or other appropriate person) to introduce you) to people whose work you admire and whose work relates to your own. </li></ul></ul></ul>
    14. 14. How to Network <ul><li>Get heard, cont. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>At talks at your institution </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Ask questions </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Attend the reception and talk to the speaker </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Attend the dinner and talk to the speaker </li></ul></ul></ul>
    15. 15. How to Network <ul><li>Now that you have their attention… </li></ul><ul><li>What do you say? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Briefly talk about your work (“Elevator pitch”) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Show familiarity with theirs (without sucking up) </li></ul></ul>
    16. 16. How to Network <ul><li>Get read </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Publications </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Journal articles (of course) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Conference proceedings </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Working papers </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Keep your website & list of pubs up-to-date </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Send your work to relevant people with a (brief) cover note explaining why. (“targeted direct (e-)mail”) </li></ul></ul>
    17. 17. Networking 2.0 <ul><li>Blogging </li></ul><ul><li>Academia.edu </li></ul><ul><li>Facebook </li></ul><ul><li>Twitter </li></ul>
    18. 18. Twitter <ul><li>Transnational network of linguists and other language specialists </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Interaction between people you know in person and (more) people you’ve never met & you may not get to meet in person ever but who are interested in the same things </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Brief, often real-time, interactions that require less time & effort than emails </li></ul></ul>
    19. 19. Twitter Examples <ul><li>Exchanging information about conferences, workshops, jobs, journals, books… </li></ul><ul><li>Collecting data on language use, speaker intuitions, language attitudes & ideologies </li></ul><ul><li>Collecting websites for teaching and research </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Collections of Praat scripts, R advice, LaTeX advice </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Instructional YouTube videos </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>News media articles & (non-)specialist blogs </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Getting a quick and varied set of responses </li></ul><ul><li>Invitations to give invited talks! </li></ul>
    20. 20. <ul><li>Spring 2009 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>I’m a student in California. I’ve been on Twitter awhile, following linguists and (interactively) tweeting about language. Then, I get offered a post-doc in Oxford... </li></ul></ul><ul><li>September 2009 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>I move to the UK. I start interactively tweeting more with people, especially linguists, living in GMT. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>November 2009 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A UK linguist on Twitter who I’ve never met in person invites me, via Twitter , to give a talk in his department. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>March 2010 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>I add another invited talk to my CV. (Three months later, I get offered a permanent position at another UK university.) </li></ul></ul>my favorite example
    21. 21. More Tips <ul><li>At conferences, hang out with students who don’t go to your school (you see those guys all the time, right?). </li></ul><ul><li>Try not to feign interest just for the sake of ‘networking’. </li></ul><ul><li>Avoid long, rambling emails to people you’ve never met. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t expect an extended back-and-forth email conversation. </li></ul><ul><li>Be patient. </li></ul>
    22. 22. Afterwards <ul><li>Follow through: email the people you’ll say you’re going to email. </li></ul><ul><li>Reintroduce yourself in email, because (brief) reminders are good. </li></ul><ul><li>Read up about the person on their website or through their work, before contacting them for the first time. </li></ul><ul><li>Respect people’s time, especially the demands on their schedule. </li></ul>
    23. 23. Always Provide Your Contact Info! <ul><ul><li>Gregory Ward </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>email : [email_address] </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>url : http://gregoryward.org/ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Lauren Hall-Lew </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>email: [email_address] </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>url: http://www.lel.ed.ac.uk/~lhlew/ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Twitter: @dialect </li></ul></ul>
    24. 24. Any Questions?

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